Limits...
DECAAF: Emphasizing the importance of MRI in AF ablation.

ElMaghawry M, Romeih S - Glob Cardiol Sci Pract (2015)

Bottom Line: Atrial fibrillation ablation is a complex and challenging procedure.The DECAAF study (Delayed-Enhancement MRI Determinant of Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation) showed that atrial tissue fibrosis, as estimated by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging, was independently associated with recurrent arrhythmia post atrial fibrillation ablation.Integrating the data provided by magnetic resonance imaging into the pre-procedural planning is crucial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Aswan Heart Centre, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Atrial fibrillation ablation is a complex and challenging procedure. Appropriate patient selection is the most critical step to ensure safe and successful atrial fibrillation ablation procedure. The DECAAF study (Delayed-Enhancement MRI Determinant of Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation) showed that atrial tissue fibrosis, as estimated by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging, was independently associated with recurrent arrhythmia post atrial fibrillation ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging also detected left atrial volume and shape. Integrating the data provided by magnetic resonance imaging into the pre-procedural planning is crucial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

This example highlights the Lasso catheter's limitations in locating the reconnection site and the usefulness of DE-CMR. (A) DE-CMR model showing a gap at the superior part of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (green arrowhead). (B) Ablation catheter at anatomic gap site. Lasso catheter positioned at RIPV shows (C) earliest activation at dipole 11 to 12 (yellow arrowhead) that corresponds to the inferoposterior part of RIPV. (D) Radiofrequency application at CMR gap (dipole 5 to 6) led to pulmonary vein isolation. (Bisbal et al. JACC: cardiovascular imaging, vol.7, No 7, 2014).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374095&req=5

fig2: This example highlights the Lasso catheter's limitations in locating the reconnection site and the usefulness of DE-CMR. (A) DE-CMR model showing a gap at the superior part of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (green arrowhead). (B) Ablation catheter at anatomic gap site. Lasso catheter positioned at RIPV shows (C) earliest activation at dipole 11 to 12 (yellow arrowhead) that corresponds to the inferoposterior part of RIPV. (D) Radiofrequency application at CMR gap (dipole 5 to 6) led to pulmonary vein isolation. (Bisbal et al. JACC: cardiovascular imaging, vol.7, No 7, 2014).

Mentions: Post-AF ablation, MRI can assess the degree left atrial reverse remodelling by detecting decrease in left atrial size14. Furthermore, in cases of AF recurrence, MRI can guide electrophysiologists to localise the reconnection sites at the ablation lines15 (Figure 2).


DECAAF: Emphasizing the importance of MRI in AF ablation.

ElMaghawry M, Romeih S - Glob Cardiol Sci Pract (2015)

This example highlights the Lasso catheter's limitations in locating the reconnection site and the usefulness of DE-CMR. (A) DE-CMR model showing a gap at the superior part of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (green arrowhead). (B) Ablation catheter at anatomic gap site. Lasso catheter positioned at RIPV shows (C) earliest activation at dipole 11 to 12 (yellow arrowhead) that corresponds to the inferoposterior part of RIPV. (D) Radiofrequency application at CMR gap (dipole 5 to 6) led to pulmonary vein isolation. (Bisbal et al. JACC: cardiovascular imaging, vol.7, No 7, 2014).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374095&req=5

fig2: This example highlights the Lasso catheter's limitations in locating the reconnection site and the usefulness of DE-CMR. (A) DE-CMR model showing a gap at the superior part of the right inferior pulmonary vein (RIPV) (green arrowhead). (B) Ablation catheter at anatomic gap site. Lasso catheter positioned at RIPV shows (C) earliest activation at dipole 11 to 12 (yellow arrowhead) that corresponds to the inferoposterior part of RIPV. (D) Radiofrequency application at CMR gap (dipole 5 to 6) led to pulmonary vein isolation. (Bisbal et al. JACC: cardiovascular imaging, vol.7, No 7, 2014).
Mentions: Post-AF ablation, MRI can assess the degree left atrial reverse remodelling by detecting decrease in left atrial size14. Furthermore, in cases of AF recurrence, MRI can guide electrophysiologists to localise the reconnection sites at the ablation lines15 (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Atrial fibrillation ablation is a complex and challenging procedure.The DECAAF study (Delayed-Enhancement MRI Determinant of Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation) showed that atrial tissue fibrosis, as estimated by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging, was independently associated with recurrent arrhythmia post atrial fibrillation ablation.Integrating the data provided by magnetic resonance imaging into the pre-procedural planning is crucial.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Aswan Heart Centre, Egypt.

ABSTRACT
Atrial fibrillation ablation is a complex and challenging procedure. Appropriate patient selection is the most critical step to ensure safe and successful atrial fibrillation ablation procedure. The DECAAF study (Delayed-Enhancement MRI Determinant of Successful Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation) showed that atrial tissue fibrosis, as estimated by delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging, was independently associated with recurrent arrhythmia post atrial fibrillation ablation. Magnetic resonance imaging also detected left atrial volume and shape. Integrating the data provided by magnetic resonance imaging into the pre-procedural planning is crucial.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus