Limits...
An n=1 case report of a child with autism improving on antibiotics and a father's quest to understand what it may mean.

Rodakis J - Microb. Ecol. Health Dis. (2015)

Bottom Line: The author, a parent of a child with autism, describes an n=1 case in which his child's autism symptoms dramatically and rapidly improved following administration of a common antibiotic.The author asserts that this finding is not unusual in the autism population and that, when combined with prior recent medical research, suggests that a link between autism and the microbiome in some children is not just plausible, but in fact likely for some meaningful percentage of cases.The author argues for increased funding for a more thorough examination of links between autism and the microbiome and poses a series of questions to be further examined in future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: N of One: Autism Research Foundation, Dallas, TX, USA; jrodakis@nofone.org.

ABSTRACT
The author, a parent of a child with autism, describes an n=1 case in which his child's autism symptoms dramatically and rapidly improved following administration of a common antibiotic. The author asserts that this finding is not unusual in the autism population and that, when combined with prior recent medical research, suggests that a link between autism and the microbiome in some children is not just plausible, but in fact likely for some meaningful percentage of cases. The author argues for increased funding for a more thorough examination of links between autism and the microbiome and poses a series of questions to be further examined in future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Converging fields in the study of ASD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374086&req=5

Figure 0001: Converging fields in the study of ASD.

Mentions: The true devil, however, will be in the details: long-term use of antibiotics does not seem like a good option or treatment approach because of its potential to further disrupt the microbiome and promote resistance. To tease apart what may be going on will take a tremendous commitment of resources and can only be done in a highly collaborative, multidisciplinary way. To even begin to address some of the questions posed in this paper requires expertise in disparate fields of medicine and science (Fig. 1), many of which have historically had little reason to collaborate. Such cooperation will require a departure from the typically siloed nature of medical research and (perhaps more importantly) how grants are made. But it can be done, indeed it must be done!


An n=1 case report of a child with autism improving on antibiotics and a father's quest to understand what it may mean.

Rodakis J - Microb. Ecol. Health Dis. (2015)

Converging fields in the study of ASD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374086&req=5

Figure 0001: Converging fields in the study of ASD.
Mentions: The true devil, however, will be in the details: long-term use of antibiotics does not seem like a good option or treatment approach because of its potential to further disrupt the microbiome and promote resistance. To tease apart what may be going on will take a tremendous commitment of resources and can only be done in a highly collaborative, multidisciplinary way. To even begin to address some of the questions posed in this paper requires expertise in disparate fields of medicine and science (Fig. 1), many of which have historically had little reason to collaborate. Such cooperation will require a departure from the typically siloed nature of medical research and (perhaps more importantly) how grants are made. But it can be done, indeed it must be done!

Bottom Line: The author, a parent of a child with autism, describes an n=1 case in which his child's autism symptoms dramatically and rapidly improved following administration of a common antibiotic.The author asserts that this finding is not unusual in the autism population and that, when combined with prior recent medical research, suggests that a link between autism and the microbiome in some children is not just plausible, but in fact likely for some meaningful percentage of cases.The author argues for increased funding for a more thorough examination of links between autism and the microbiome and poses a series of questions to be further examined in future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: N of One: Autism Research Foundation, Dallas, TX, USA; jrodakis@nofone.org.

ABSTRACT
The author, a parent of a child with autism, describes an n=1 case in which his child's autism symptoms dramatically and rapidly improved following administration of a common antibiotic. The author asserts that this finding is not unusual in the autism population and that, when combined with prior recent medical research, suggests that a link between autism and the microbiome in some children is not just plausible, but in fact likely for some meaningful percentage of cases. The author argues for increased funding for a more thorough examination of links between autism and the microbiome and poses a series of questions to be further examined in future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus