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Comparative study of the methane production based on the chemical compositions of Mangifera Indica and Manihot Utilissima leaves.

Mambanzulua Ngoma P, Hiligsmann S, Sumbu Zola E, Culot M, Fievez T, Thonart P - Springerplus (2015)

Bottom Line: Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded.Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers.However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Walloon Center of Industrial Biology (CWBI), Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liège, 2 Passage des Déportés, 5030 Gembloux, Belgium ; Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, P. O. Box 212, Kinshasa XI, Democratic Republic of Congo.

ABSTRACT
Leaves of Mangifera Indica (MI, mango leaves) and Manihot Utilissima (MU, cassava leaves) are available in tropical regions and are the most accessible vegetal wastes of Kinshasa, capital of Democratic Republic of Congo. These wastes are not suitably managed and are not rationally valorized. They are abandoned in full air, on the soil and in the rivers. They thus pollute environment. By contrast, they can be recuperated and treated in order to produce methane (energy source), organic fertilizer and clean up the environment simultaneously. The main objective of this study was to investigate methane production from MI and MU leaves by BMP tests at 30°C. The yields achieved from the anaerobic digestion of up to 61.3 g raw matter in 1 l medium were 0.001 l/g and 0.100 l CH4/g volatile solids of MI and MU leaves, respectively. The yield of MU leaves was in the range mentioned in the literature for other leaves because of a poor presence of bioactive substrates, and low C/N ratio. This methane yield corresponded to 7% of calorific power of wood. By contrast, the methane yield from MI leaves was almost nil suggesting some metabolism inhibition because of their rich composition in carbon and bioactive substrates. Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded. Therefore, methane production from the sole MI leaves seems unfavorable by comparison to MU leaves at the ambient temperature in tropical regions. Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers. However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion.

No MeSH data available.


VFAs production during anaerobic digestion of leaves in different concentrations in dry matter; MU leaves: a 1.7 g/l, b 6.7 g/l, c 13.3 g/l, d 49.5 g/l and MI leaves: e 1.7 g/l, f 6.7 g/l, g 13.3 g/l, h 54.4 g/l and i glucose in BMP tests.
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Fig3: VFAs production during anaerobic digestion of leaves in different concentrations in dry matter; MU leaves: a 1.7 g/l, b 6.7 g/l, c 13.3 g/l, d 49.5 g/l and MI leaves: e 1.7 g/l, f 6.7 g/l, g 13.3 g/l, h 54.4 g/l and i glucose in BMP tests.

Mentions: No VFA was detected in the blank samples. The maximum concentrations of VFAs reached to 1.5 g/l for test with Gl, from 0.2 to 6.5 g/l for MU leaves at concentrations of 1.7 g/l and 49.5 g/l, respectively and 0.3 to 10.3 g/l for MI leaves at concentrations of 1.7 g/l and 54.4 g/l, respectively (Figure 3). After 230 days, the concentrations of VFAs were 0 for all concentrations of MU leaves and both the lower concentration of MI leaves. By contrast, they were of 0.2 g/l for the positive test with Gl and of 1.4 and 10.3 g/l for MI leaves at concentrations of 13.3 g/l and 54.4 g/l, respectively (Figure 3). Acetic acid was the only one present VFA in Gl after 230 days.Figure 3


Comparative study of the methane production based on the chemical compositions of Mangifera Indica and Manihot Utilissima leaves.

Mambanzulua Ngoma P, Hiligsmann S, Sumbu Zola E, Culot M, Fievez T, Thonart P - Springerplus (2015)

VFAs production during anaerobic digestion of leaves in different concentrations in dry matter; MU leaves: a 1.7 g/l, b 6.7 g/l, c 13.3 g/l, d 49.5 g/l and MI leaves: e 1.7 g/l, f 6.7 g/l, g 13.3 g/l, h 54.4 g/l and i glucose in BMP tests.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374082&req=5

Fig3: VFAs production during anaerobic digestion of leaves in different concentrations in dry matter; MU leaves: a 1.7 g/l, b 6.7 g/l, c 13.3 g/l, d 49.5 g/l and MI leaves: e 1.7 g/l, f 6.7 g/l, g 13.3 g/l, h 54.4 g/l and i glucose in BMP tests.
Mentions: No VFA was detected in the blank samples. The maximum concentrations of VFAs reached to 1.5 g/l for test with Gl, from 0.2 to 6.5 g/l for MU leaves at concentrations of 1.7 g/l and 49.5 g/l, respectively and 0.3 to 10.3 g/l for MI leaves at concentrations of 1.7 g/l and 54.4 g/l, respectively (Figure 3). After 230 days, the concentrations of VFAs were 0 for all concentrations of MU leaves and both the lower concentration of MI leaves. By contrast, they were of 0.2 g/l for the positive test with Gl and of 1.4 and 10.3 g/l for MI leaves at concentrations of 13.3 g/l and 54.4 g/l, respectively (Figure 3). Acetic acid was the only one present VFA in Gl after 230 days.Figure 3

Bottom Line: Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded.Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers.However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Walloon Center of Industrial Biology (CWBI), Gembloux Agro-Bio Tech, University of Liège, 2 Passage des Déportés, 5030 Gembloux, Belgium ; Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Kinshasa, P. O. Box 212, Kinshasa XI, Democratic Republic of Congo.

ABSTRACT
Leaves of Mangifera Indica (MI, mango leaves) and Manihot Utilissima (MU, cassava leaves) are available in tropical regions and are the most accessible vegetal wastes of Kinshasa, capital of Democratic Republic of Congo. These wastes are not suitably managed and are not rationally valorized. They are abandoned in full air, on the soil and in the rivers. They thus pollute environment. By contrast, they can be recuperated and treated in order to produce methane (energy source), organic fertilizer and clean up the environment simultaneously. The main objective of this study was to investigate methane production from MI and MU leaves by BMP tests at 30°C. The yields achieved from the anaerobic digestion of up to 61.3 g raw matter in 1 l medium were 0.001 l/g and 0.100 l CH4/g volatile solids of MI and MU leaves, respectively. The yield of MU leaves was in the range mentioned in the literature for other leaves because of a poor presence of bioactive substrates, and low C/N ratio. This methane yield corresponded to 7% of calorific power of wood. By contrast, the methane yield from MI leaves was almost nil suggesting some metabolism inhibition because of their rich composition in carbon and bioactive substrates. Whereas classical acidogenesis and acetogenesis were recorded. Therefore, methane production from the sole MI leaves seems unfavorable by comparison to MU leaves at the ambient temperature in tropical regions. Their solid and liquid residues obtained after anaerobic digestion would be efficient fertilizers. However, the methane productivity of both leaves could be improved by anaerobic co-digestion.

No MeSH data available.