Limits...
Dialing torque preferences of people with diabetes when using insulin pens: a pilot study.

Friedrichs A, Schmitz M, Kamlot S, Adler S - Diabetes Ther (2015)

Bottom Line: In this pilot study, subjective ratings of dialing comfort for different insulin pens by participants appear to concur with previous laboratory dialing torque study results.There appears to be a "torque comfort zone." Torques above 50 N mm reduced subjective handling comfort.Further, larger scale studies are needed to establish that dialing torque affects pen users' comfort.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: LWS Risk Management Consult GmbH, Brannenburg, Germany, arnd.friedrichs@lwsgroup.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ergonomic dialing torque may enhance safety and comfort when setting doses with insulin pens. Limited data are available on the correlation of dialing torque and dialing comfort.

Methods: Three studies were performed with SoloSTAR(®) (SS; Sanofi), FlexPen(®) (FP; Novo Nordisk), KwikPen(®) (KP; Eli Lilly) and FlexTouch(®) (FT; Novo Nordisk) pens. Dialing behavior was examined with 20 pen-experienced people with diabetes. Participants dialed up to the maximum dose and back down to "zero" with each pen. Hand and pen movements were recorded by video camera and rotational speeds and angles calculated for each pen. In a laboratory study, dialing torque was measured discontinuously at a speed of 120°/s, reflecting typical patient behavior. Sixteen pen-experienced people with diabetes participated in a pilot preference study. Using a Likert scale, subjective dialing comfort rankings and ratings were obtained for each pen type and matched to their dialing torque. SS, FP, KP, and FT1 were investigated at 0-20 U each and at 60-80 U for FT2.

Results: SS was ranked most comfortable for up-dialing by 8 and down-dialing by 6 of the 16 participants, respectively; FP, 5 and 8; FT1, 2 and 1; and KP, 1 and 1. FT2 was ranked least comfortable by 12 and 10 participants. Comfort for up- and down-dialing was rated "very comfortable" for SS by 15 participants each, followed by FP (12 and 14), KP (10 each), and FT1 (9 and 7); FT2 was rated "less" or "not" comfortable by 10 and 11 people, respectively.

Conclusion: In this pilot study, subjective ratings of dialing comfort for different insulin pens by participants appear to concur with previous laboratory dialing torque study results. There appears to be a "torque comfort zone." Torques above 50 N mm reduced subjective handling comfort. Further, larger scale studies are needed to establish that dialing torque affects pen users' comfort.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of maximum torque for discontinuous up-dialing at 1 U/s and 120°/s in relation to dialing torque recommendations by ISO [15] and Asakura [16]. P values were calculated with a paired two-sample t test
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374073&req=5

Fig1: Comparison of maximum torque for discontinuous up-dialing at 1 U/s and 120°/s in relation to dialing torque recommendations by ISO [15] and Asakura [16]. P values were calculated with a paired two-sample t test

Mentions: Regardless of the chosen speed, different pen types required different dialing torques to dial a maximum dose (Fig. 1). FP had the lowest dialing torques, followed by SS, with consistently lower dial-up torques than KP. FT required up to seven times higher dial-up torques than FP, due to its spring-loaded mechanism. Maximum dial-up torques for discontinuous dialing exceeded 80 N mm with FT at 120°/s (8 U/s).Fig. 1


Dialing torque preferences of people with diabetes when using insulin pens: a pilot study.

Friedrichs A, Schmitz M, Kamlot S, Adler S - Diabetes Ther (2015)

Comparison of maximum torque for discontinuous up-dialing at 1 U/s and 120°/s in relation to dialing torque recommendations by ISO [15] and Asakura [16]. P values were calculated with a paired two-sample t test
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4374073&req=5

Fig1: Comparison of maximum torque for discontinuous up-dialing at 1 U/s and 120°/s in relation to dialing torque recommendations by ISO [15] and Asakura [16]. P values were calculated with a paired two-sample t test
Mentions: Regardless of the chosen speed, different pen types required different dialing torques to dial a maximum dose (Fig. 1). FP had the lowest dialing torques, followed by SS, with consistently lower dial-up torques than KP. FT required up to seven times higher dial-up torques than FP, due to its spring-loaded mechanism. Maximum dial-up torques for discontinuous dialing exceeded 80 N mm with FT at 120°/s (8 U/s).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: In this pilot study, subjective ratings of dialing comfort for different insulin pens by participants appear to concur with previous laboratory dialing torque study results.There appears to be a "torque comfort zone." Torques above 50 N mm reduced subjective handling comfort.Further, larger scale studies are needed to establish that dialing torque affects pen users' comfort.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: LWS Risk Management Consult GmbH, Brannenburg, Germany, arnd.friedrichs@lwsgroup.com.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ergonomic dialing torque may enhance safety and comfort when setting doses with insulin pens. Limited data are available on the correlation of dialing torque and dialing comfort.

Methods: Three studies were performed with SoloSTAR(®) (SS; Sanofi), FlexPen(®) (FP; Novo Nordisk), KwikPen(®) (KP; Eli Lilly) and FlexTouch(®) (FT; Novo Nordisk) pens. Dialing behavior was examined with 20 pen-experienced people with diabetes. Participants dialed up to the maximum dose and back down to "zero" with each pen. Hand and pen movements were recorded by video camera and rotational speeds and angles calculated for each pen. In a laboratory study, dialing torque was measured discontinuously at a speed of 120°/s, reflecting typical patient behavior. Sixteen pen-experienced people with diabetes participated in a pilot preference study. Using a Likert scale, subjective dialing comfort rankings and ratings were obtained for each pen type and matched to their dialing torque. SS, FP, KP, and FT1 were investigated at 0-20 U each and at 60-80 U for FT2.

Results: SS was ranked most comfortable for up-dialing by 8 and down-dialing by 6 of the 16 participants, respectively; FP, 5 and 8; FT1, 2 and 1; and KP, 1 and 1. FT2 was ranked least comfortable by 12 and 10 participants. Comfort for up- and down-dialing was rated "very comfortable" for SS by 15 participants each, followed by FP (12 and 14), KP (10 each), and FT1 (9 and 7); FT2 was rated "less" or "not" comfortable by 10 and 11 people, respectively.

Conclusion: In this pilot study, subjective ratings of dialing comfort for different insulin pens by participants appear to concur with previous laboratory dialing torque study results. There appears to be a "torque comfort zone." Torques above 50 N mm reduced subjective handling comfort. Further, larger scale studies are needed to establish that dialing torque affects pen users' comfort.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus