Limits...
Muscle oxygen changes following Sprint Interval Cycling training in elite field hockey players.

Jones B, Hamilton DK, Cooper CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm).No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24).NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sports and Exercise Science, School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34 ± 0.14 to 5.50 ± 0.14 m.s(-1)) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37 ± 0.27 to 5.39 ± 0.30 m.s(-1)) significant changes were seen in the 30-15 IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm). No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental group individual pre vs. post training ΔTSI and ΔHHb+Mb values.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373931&req=5

pone.0120338.g003: Experimental group individual pre vs. post training ΔTSI and ΔHHb+Mb values.

Mentions: Fig. 1 & Fig. 2 illustrate the NIRS detected changes (group averaged data) for the pre-training test (the general trend was similar for both tests). A decrease in TSI was seen immediately upon the start of the maximal intensity cycling test. This recovered rapidly following the end of the test, in some cases overshooting the baseline (a hyperaemic effect). This drop in TSI was caused by a fall in HbO2 + MbO2 and a rise in HHb+HMb. The total volume of blood in the muscle (tHb) also fell immediately upon exercise start. Table 1 summarizes the effect of training on all the muscle optical parameters. The tissue became significantly more deoxygenated post training, with significant changes in both HbO2+MbO2 and HHb+HMb. However, no significant change was seen in muscle blood volume (tHb). Fig. 3 shows the experimental group individual data for the changes in TSI and HHb+HMb amplitude for pre vs. post repeated maximal intensity cycle tests.


Muscle oxygen changes following Sprint Interval Cycling training in elite field hockey players.

Jones B, Hamilton DK, Cooper CE - PLoS ONE (2015)

Experimental group individual pre vs. post training ΔTSI and ΔHHb+Mb values.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373931&req=5

pone.0120338.g003: Experimental group individual pre vs. post training ΔTSI and ΔHHb+Mb values.
Mentions: Fig. 1 & Fig. 2 illustrate the NIRS detected changes (group averaged data) for the pre-training test (the general trend was similar for both tests). A decrease in TSI was seen immediately upon the start of the maximal intensity cycling test. This recovered rapidly following the end of the test, in some cases overshooting the baseline (a hyperaemic effect). This drop in TSI was caused by a fall in HbO2 + MbO2 and a rise in HHb+HMb. The total volume of blood in the muscle (tHb) also fell immediately upon exercise start. Table 1 summarizes the effect of training on all the muscle optical parameters. The tissue became significantly more deoxygenated post training, with significant changes in both HbO2+MbO2 and HHb+HMb. However, no significant change was seen in muscle blood volume (tHb). Fig. 3 shows the experimental group individual data for the changes in TSI and HHb+HMb amplitude for pre vs. post repeated maximal intensity cycle tests.

Bottom Line: EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm).No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24).NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Sports and Exercise Science, School of Biological Sciences, University of Essex, Colchester, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
This study examined the effects of Sprint Interval Cycling (SIT) on muscle oxygenation kinetics and performance during the 30-15 intermittent fitness test (IFT). Twenty-five women hockey players of Olympic standard were randomly selected into an experimental group (EXP) and a control group (CON). The EXP group performed six additional SIT sessions over six weeks in addition to their normal training program. To explore the potential training-induced change, EXP subjects additionally completed 5 x 30s maximal intensity cycle testing before and after training. During these tests near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measured parameters; oxyhaemoglobin + oxymyoglobin (HbO2+ MbO2), tissue deoxyhaemoglobin + deoxymyoglobin (HHb+HMb), total tissue haemoglobin (tHb) and tissue oxygenation (TSI %) were taken. In the EXP group (5.34 ± 0.14 to 5.50 ± 0.14 m.s(-1)) but not the CON group (pre = 5.37 ± 0.27 to 5.39 ± 0.30 m.s(-1)) significant changes were seen in the 30-15 IFT performance. EXP group also displayed significant post-training increases during the sprint cycling: ΔTSI (-7.59 ± 0.91 to -12.16 ± 2.70%); ΔHHb+HMb (35.68 ± 6.67 to 69.44 ± 26.48 μM.cm); and ΔHbO2+ MbO2 (-74.29 ± 13.82 to -109.36 ± 22.61 μM.cm). No significant differences were seen in ΔtHb (-45.81 ± 15.23 to -42.93 ± 16.24). NIRS is able to detect positive peripheral muscle oxygenation changes when used during a SIT protocol which has been shown to be an effective training modality within elite athletes.

No MeSH data available.