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Exploring the role of quantitative feedback in inhaler technique education: a cluster-randomised, two-arm, parallel-group, repeated-measures study.

Toumas-Shehata M, Price D, Basheti IA, Bosnic-Anticevich S - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: A parallel-group, repeated-measures study was conducted in the community pharmacy in which the effectiveness of current best practice inhaler technique education utilising qualitative visual feedback (Group 1) was compared with a combination of qualitative and quantitative visual feedback (Group 2).The magnitude of improvement was statistically significantly higher for Group 2 compared with Group 1 (n=97, P=0.02, Pearson's Chi-Square test).The nature of feedback has an impact on the effectiveness of inhaler technique education with regard to correct inhaler technique maintenance over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Woolcock Institute of Medical Research and The University of Sydney, Glebe, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Feedback is a critical component of any educational intervention. When it comes to feedback associated with inhaler technique education, there is a lack of knowledge on its role or its potential to solve the major issue of poor inhaler technique.

Aims: This study aims to explore the role of feedback in inhaler technique education and its impact on the inhaler technique of patients over time.

Methods: A parallel-group, repeated-measures study was conducted in the community pharmacy in which the effectiveness of current best practice inhaler technique education utilising qualitative visual feedback (Group 1) was compared with a combination of qualitative and quantitative visual feedback (Group 2). The impact of these two interventions on inhaler technique maintenance was evaluated. Community pharmacists were randomly allocated to recruit people with asthma who were using a dry powder inhaler. At Visit 1 their inhaler technique was evaluated and education delivered and they were followed up at Visit 2 (1 month later).

Results: Both educational interventions resulted in an increase in the proportion of patients with correct inhaler technique: from 4% to 51% in Group 1 and from 6% to 83% in Group 2 (Pearson's Chi-Squared, P=0.03, n=49, and Pearson's Chi-Squared, P=0.01, n=48, respectively). The magnitude of improvement was statistically significantly higher for Group 2 compared with Group 1 (n=97, P=0.02, Pearson's Chi-Square test).

Conclusions: The nature of feedback has an impact on the effectiveness of inhaler technique education with regard to correct inhaler technique maintenance over time.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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fig1: Photo of Inhalation Manager.

Mentions: The quantitative feedback involved the use of a portable hand-held spirometer (Inhalation Manager (IM, TEVA Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Tel Aviv, Israel)), which has been developed with the ability to assess breathing manoeuvres associated with the use of different inhaler devices (Figure 1). The IM is a preprogrammed device that can measure breathing manoeuvres and provides feedback both in numeric and visual/graphic forms. Actual breathing manoeuvres are then compared with optimal manoeuvres for a particular inhaler. This allows the patient to see exactly where they are making errors and to what extent (Figure 2). A DVD showing HCPs delivering inhaler technique education to people with asthma was used to consolidate the training of pharmacists (The DVD was funded through Australian Research Council Linkage Project LP LP0882737).20 Pharmacists also received an update on basic asthma management and inhaled medications.


Exploring the role of quantitative feedback in inhaler technique education: a cluster-randomised, two-arm, parallel-group, repeated-measures study.

Toumas-Shehata M, Price D, Basheti IA, Bosnic-Anticevich S - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Photo of Inhalation Manager.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373466&req=5

fig1: Photo of Inhalation Manager.
Mentions: The quantitative feedback involved the use of a portable hand-held spirometer (Inhalation Manager (IM, TEVA Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd, Tel Aviv, Israel)), which has been developed with the ability to assess breathing manoeuvres associated with the use of different inhaler devices (Figure 1). The IM is a preprogrammed device that can measure breathing manoeuvres and provides feedback both in numeric and visual/graphic forms. Actual breathing manoeuvres are then compared with optimal manoeuvres for a particular inhaler. This allows the patient to see exactly where they are making errors and to what extent (Figure 2). A DVD showing HCPs delivering inhaler technique education to people with asthma was used to consolidate the training of pharmacists (The DVD was funded through Australian Research Council Linkage Project LP LP0882737).20 Pharmacists also received an update on basic asthma management and inhaled medications.

Bottom Line: A parallel-group, repeated-measures study was conducted in the community pharmacy in which the effectiveness of current best practice inhaler technique education utilising qualitative visual feedback (Group 1) was compared with a combination of qualitative and quantitative visual feedback (Group 2).The magnitude of improvement was statistically significantly higher for Group 2 compared with Group 1 (n=97, P=0.02, Pearson's Chi-Square test).The nature of feedback has an impact on the effectiveness of inhaler technique education with regard to correct inhaler technique maintenance over time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Woolcock Institute of Medical Research and The University of Sydney, Glebe, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Feedback is a critical component of any educational intervention. When it comes to feedback associated with inhaler technique education, there is a lack of knowledge on its role or its potential to solve the major issue of poor inhaler technique.

Aims: This study aims to explore the role of feedback in inhaler technique education and its impact on the inhaler technique of patients over time.

Methods: A parallel-group, repeated-measures study was conducted in the community pharmacy in which the effectiveness of current best practice inhaler technique education utilising qualitative visual feedback (Group 1) was compared with a combination of qualitative and quantitative visual feedback (Group 2). The impact of these two interventions on inhaler technique maintenance was evaluated. Community pharmacists were randomly allocated to recruit people with asthma who were using a dry powder inhaler. At Visit 1 their inhaler technique was evaluated and education delivered and they were followed up at Visit 2 (1 month later).

Results: Both educational interventions resulted in an increase in the proportion of patients with correct inhaler technique: from 4% to 51% in Group 1 and from 6% to 83% in Group 2 (Pearson's Chi-Squared, P=0.03, n=49, and Pearson's Chi-Squared, P=0.01, n=48, respectively). The magnitude of improvement was statistically significantly higher for Group 2 compared with Group 1 (n=97, P=0.02, Pearson's Chi-Square test).

Conclusions: The nature of feedback has an impact on the effectiveness of inhaler technique education with regard to correct inhaler technique maintenance over time.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus