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Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation alters electrical conductivity of human epicardial cells.

Bax NA, Pijnappels DA, van Oorschot AA, Winter EM, de Vries AA, van Tuyn J, Braun J, Maas S, Schalij MJ, Atsma DE, Goumans MJ, Gittenberger-de Groot AC - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Bottom Line: After spontaneous EMT in vitro the EPDCs acquired a spindle-shaped morphology confirmed by vimentin staining.When comparing both types we observed that the electrical conduction is influenced by EMT, resulting in significantly reduced conductivity of spindle-shaped EPDCs, associated with a conduction block.These differences may be of relevance for the role of EPDCs in cardiac development, and in EMT-related cardiac dysfunction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Overview of conduction velocities, and corresponding conduction delays, measured in EPDCs in-between two adjacent fields of CMCs. Conduction velocity was significantly decreased in sEPDCs. In fact, with increasing distance (360 μm) sEPDCs were no longer able to conduct the electrical impulse across the channel, resulting in asynchronized beating of the two CMC fields. No significant differences were found during follow-up at 48 hrs (A). Extracellular electrograms derived from cocultures of labelled EPDCs and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, 24 hrs (light grey) and 48 hrs (dark grey) after plating (B). These electrograms clearly show the decremental nature of conduction across EPDCs, regardless of EMT. However, as conduction across these EPDCs depends on electrotonic interaction, the decrease in connexin levels that occurs in these cells during EMT is expected to result in conduction block over a certain distance (B). #P < 0.05 versus sEPDCs.
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fig04: Overview of conduction velocities, and corresponding conduction delays, measured in EPDCs in-between two adjacent fields of CMCs. Conduction velocity was significantly decreased in sEPDCs. In fact, with increasing distance (360 μm) sEPDCs were no longer able to conduct the electrical impulse across the channel, resulting in asynchronized beating of the two CMC fields. No significant differences were found during follow-up at 48 hrs (A). Extracellular electrograms derived from cocultures of labelled EPDCs and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, 24 hrs (light grey) and 48 hrs (dark grey) after plating (B). These electrograms clearly show the decremental nature of conduction across EPDCs, regardless of EMT. However, as conduction across these EPDCs depends on electrotonic interaction, the decrease in connexin levels that occurs in these cells during EMT is expected to result in conduction block over a certain distance (B). #P < 0.05 versus sEPDCs.

Mentions: Multi-electrode recordings of electrical conduction across cEPDCs and adjacent CMC fields showed persistent electrical interaction between the two CMC fields. Electrograms recorded from the site of cEPDCs showed their ability to conduct electrical impulses over a 270-μm-wide channel (n = 8), resulting in electrical activation of the distal CMC field. Further analysis of electrogram characteristics confirmed a substantial conduction delay between the two CMC fields, caused by relatively slow conduction across these cEPDCs (4.2 ± 0.9 cm/sec) (Fig. 4A and B). To study the functional effects of EMT, the separated CMC fields were now connected by seeding sEPDCs in the channel (n = 8). Similar to cEPDCs, these sEPDCs also functioned as a conductive cellular bridge in-between the two CMC fields within 24 hrs after application. However, EPDC-related conduction delays were significantly increased, and consequently, conduction velocity across sEPDCs was significantly decreased as compared to cEPDCs, now reaching values of 1.8 ± 1 cm/sec.


Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transformation alters electrical conductivity of human epicardial cells.

Bax NA, Pijnappels DA, van Oorschot AA, Winter EM, de Vries AA, van Tuyn J, Braun J, Maas S, Schalij MJ, Atsma DE, Goumans MJ, Gittenberger-de Groot AC - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Overview of conduction velocities, and corresponding conduction delays, measured in EPDCs in-between two adjacent fields of CMCs. Conduction velocity was significantly decreased in sEPDCs. In fact, with increasing distance (360 μm) sEPDCs were no longer able to conduct the electrical impulse across the channel, resulting in asynchronized beating of the two CMC fields. No significant differences were found during follow-up at 48 hrs (A). Extracellular electrograms derived from cocultures of labelled EPDCs and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, 24 hrs (light grey) and 48 hrs (dark grey) after plating (B). These electrograms clearly show the decremental nature of conduction across EPDCs, regardless of EMT. However, as conduction across these EPDCs depends on electrotonic interaction, the decrease in connexin levels that occurs in these cells during EMT is expected to result in conduction block over a certain distance (B). #P < 0.05 versus sEPDCs.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373436&req=5

fig04: Overview of conduction velocities, and corresponding conduction delays, measured in EPDCs in-between two adjacent fields of CMCs. Conduction velocity was significantly decreased in sEPDCs. In fact, with increasing distance (360 μm) sEPDCs were no longer able to conduct the electrical impulse across the channel, resulting in asynchronized beating of the two CMC fields. No significant differences were found during follow-up at 48 hrs (A). Extracellular electrograms derived from cocultures of labelled EPDCs and neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, 24 hrs (light grey) and 48 hrs (dark grey) after plating (B). These electrograms clearly show the decremental nature of conduction across EPDCs, regardless of EMT. However, as conduction across these EPDCs depends on electrotonic interaction, the decrease in connexin levels that occurs in these cells during EMT is expected to result in conduction block over a certain distance (B). #P < 0.05 versus sEPDCs.
Mentions: Multi-electrode recordings of electrical conduction across cEPDCs and adjacent CMC fields showed persistent electrical interaction between the two CMC fields. Electrograms recorded from the site of cEPDCs showed their ability to conduct electrical impulses over a 270-μm-wide channel (n = 8), resulting in electrical activation of the distal CMC field. Further analysis of electrogram characteristics confirmed a substantial conduction delay between the two CMC fields, caused by relatively slow conduction across these cEPDCs (4.2 ± 0.9 cm/sec) (Fig. 4A and B). To study the functional effects of EMT, the separated CMC fields were now connected by seeding sEPDCs in the channel (n = 8). Similar to cEPDCs, these sEPDCs also functioned as a conductive cellular bridge in-between the two CMC fields within 24 hrs after application. However, EPDC-related conduction delays were significantly increased, and consequently, conduction velocity across sEPDCs was significantly decreased as compared to cEPDCs, now reaching values of 1.8 ± 1 cm/sec.

Bottom Line: After spontaneous EMT in vitro the EPDCs acquired a spindle-shaped morphology confirmed by vimentin staining.When comparing both types we observed that the electrical conduction is influenced by EMT, resulting in significantly reduced conductivity of spindle-shaped EPDCs, associated with a conduction block.These differences may be of relevance for the role of EPDCs in cardiac development, and in EMT-related cardiac dysfunction.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus