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Inhaler device technique can be improved in older adults through tailored education: findings from a randomised controlled trial.

Crane MA, Jenkins CR, Goeman DP, Douglass JA - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Improvement in technique was observed in the active group at 3 months (P<0.001) and remained significant at 12 months (P<0.001).No statistically significant improvement was observed in the passive group.Passive education alone fails to achieve any improvement in device technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effects of inhaler device technique education on improving inhaler technique in older people with asthma.

Methods: In a randomised controlled trial, device technique education was provided to a sample of 123 adults aged >55 years who had a doctor diagnosis of asthma. The active education group received one-on-one technique coaching, including observation, verbal instruction and physical demonstration at baseline. The passive group received a device-specific instruction pamphlet only. Inhaler technique, including the critical steps for each device type, was assessed and scored according to Australian National Asthma Council (NAC) guidelines. Device technique was scored objectively at baseline and again at 3 and 12 months post education.

Results: The majority of participants demonstrated poor technique at baseline. Only 11 (21%) of the active intervention group and 7 (16%) of the passive group demonstrated 100% correct technique. By 3 months 26 (48%) of the active group achieved adequate technique. Improvement in technique was observed in the active group at 3 months (P<0.001) and remained significant at 12 months (P<0.001). No statistically significant improvement was observed in the passive group.

Conclusion: The provision of active device technique education improves device technique in older adults. Passive education alone fails to achieve any improvement in device technique.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Spacer uptake of pMDI device users.
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fig2: Spacer uptake of pMDI device users.

Mentions: Active participants using a pMDI device were encouraged to utilise a large volumatic spacer (LVS) with their pMDI device as a part of device education. Initially, 7 (43.8%) pMDI users in the active group and 7 (41.2%) in the passive group were using a spacer. By 3-month follow-up a greater proportion of both groups had started using an LVS (Figure 2); however, uptake was statistically higher in the active group compared with the passive group (3 months: P=0.001; 12 months: P<0.0001). Device technique was also better amongst those who used a spacer compared with pMDI alone. This was true in both active and control groups. At 12-month follow-up 9/15 (60%) active participants achieved maximal technique score using a spacer versus 1/3 (33%) who continued using a pMDI alone, while 4/11 (36%) control participants using a spacer achieved maximal score versus 1/9 (11%) with pMDI alone.


Inhaler device technique can be improved in older adults through tailored education: findings from a randomised controlled trial.

Crane MA, Jenkins CR, Goeman DP, Douglass JA - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Spacer uptake of pMDI device users.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373405&req=5

fig2: Spacer uptake of pMDI device users.
Mentions: Active participants using a pMDI device were encouraged to utilise a large volumatic spacer (LVS) with their pMDI device as a part of device education. Initially, 7 (43.8%) pMDI users in the active group and 7 (41.2%) in the passive group were using a spacer. By 3-month follow-up a greater proportion of both groups had started using an LVS (Figure 2); however, uptake was statistically higher in the active group compared with the passive group (3 months: P=0.001; 12 months: P<0.0001). Device technique was also better amongst those who used a spacer compared with pMDI alone. This was true in both active and control groups. At 12-month follow-up 9/15 (60%) active participants achieved maximal technique score using a spacer versus 1/3 (33%) who continued using a pMDI alone, while 4/11 (36%) control participants using a spacer achieved maximal score versus 1/9 (11%) with pMDI alone.

Bottom Line: Improvement in technique was observed in the active group at 3 months (P<0.001) and remained significant at 12 months (P<0.001).No statistically significant improvement was observed in the passive group.Passive education alone fails to achieve any improvement in device technique.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To investigate the effects of inhaler device technique education on improving inhaler technique in older people with asthma.

Methods: In a randomised controlled trial, device technique education was provided to a sample of 123 adults aged >55 years who had a doctor diagnosis of asthma. The active education group received one-on-one technique coaching, including observation, verbal instruction and physical demonstration at baseline. The passive group received a device-specific instruction pamphlet only. Inhaler technique, including the critical steps for each device type, was assessed and scored according to Australian National Asthma Council (NAC) guidelines. Device technique was scored objectively at baseline and again at 3 and 12 months post education.

Results: The majority of participants demonstrated poor technique at baseline. Only 11 (21%) of the active intervention group and 7 (16%) of the passive group demonstrated 100% correct technique. By 3 months 26 (48%) of the active group achieved adequate technique. Improvement in technique was observed in the active group at 3 months (P<0.001) and remained significant at 12 months (P<0.001). No statistically significant improvement was observed in the passive group.

Conclusion: The provision of active device technique education improves device technique in older adults. Passive education alone fails to achieve any improvement in device technique.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus