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Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells.

Nat R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Bottom Line: The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures.It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex.In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Irina-Roxana.Nat@i-med.ac.at

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Dendritic spine morphology of the neurons from hES cells. Human neurons derived from embryonic stem cells after 32 days of differentiation in vitro: the neurons formed very long projections with complex spine morphologies and different thickness (A, B); staining for the neuronal marker tau. Scale bars: 20 μm.
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fig03: Dendritic spine morphology of the neurons from hES cells. Human neurons derived from embryonic stem cells after 32 days of differentiation in vitro: the neurons formed very long projections with complex spine morphologies and different thickness (A, B); staining for the neuronal marker tau. Scale bars: 20 μm.

Mentions: The hES cell derived neurons were maintained in culture for prolonged time, with optimized culture conditions, and formed spectacular networks (Fig. 2A), where the majority acquired a glutamatergic phenotype (Fig. 2B). They presented pyramidal like-morphologies (Fig. 3A) and, like a novel aspect of hES cell derived neuronal morphology, dendritic spines with specific cortical morphologies could be identified in vitro (Fig. 3A, B), as was recently shown for the mES cell derived cortical neurons [8]. The subtype-related cortical neuronal specification and the functional characterization in vitro are under investigation.


Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells.

Nat R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Dendritic spine morphology of the neurons from hES cells. Human neurons derived from embryonic stem cells after 32 days of differentiation in vitro: the neurons formed very long projections with complex spine morphologies and different thickness (A, B); staining for the neuronal marker tau. Scale bars: 20 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373340&req=5

fig03: Dendritic spine morphology of the neurons from hES cells. Human neurons derived from embryonic stem cells after 32 days of differentiation in vitro: the neurons formed very long projections with complex spine morphologies and different thickness (A, B); staining for the neuronal marker tau. Scale bars: 20 μm.
Mentions: The hES cell derived neurons were maintained in culture for prolonged time, with optimized culture conditions, and formed spectacular networks (Fig. 2A), where the majority acquired a glutamatergic phenotype (Fig. 2B). They presented pyramidal like-morphologies (Fig. 3A) and, like a novel aspect of hES cell derived neuronal morphology, dendritic spines with specific cortical morphologies could be identified in vitro (Fig. 3A, B), as was recently shown for the mES cell derived cortical neurons [8]. The subtype-related cortical neuronal specification and the functional characterization in vitro are under investigation.

Bottom Line: The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures.It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex.In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Irina-Roxana.Nat@i-med.ac.at

Show MeSH