Limits...
Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells.

Nat R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Bottom Line: The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures.It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex.In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Irina-Roxana.Nat@i-med.ac.at

Show MeSH
Generation of neurons from hES cell derived forebrain-like progenitors. Neural progenitors and neurons derived from hES cells after 22 days of differentiation in vitro, expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (red) (A) and the forebrain-related membranar marker Forse1 (red) (B). Green, tau-stained neurons and blue, Hoechst 33342 stained nuclei. Scale bar: 20 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373340&req=5

fig01: Generation of neurons from hES cell derived forebrain-like progenitors. Neural progenitors and neurons derived from hES cells after 22 days of differentiation in vitro, expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (red) (A) and the forebrain-related membranar marker Forse1 (red) (B). Green, tau-stained neurons and blue, Hoechst 33342 stained nuclei. Scale bar: 20 μm.

Mentions: First, neuroepithelial cells were induced from hES cells, in chemical-defined cell culture conditions, without morphogens, and they acquired an anterior phenotype [5–7]. They differentiated into neural progenitor cells expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (Fig. 1A) and the forebrain membranar marker Forse1 (Fig. 1B), and started to generate neurons (Fig. 1A, B).


Cortical network from human embryonic stem cells.

Nat R - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2011)

Generation of neurons from hES cell derived forebrain-like progenitors. Neural progenitors and neurons derived from hES cells after 22 days of differentiation in vitro, expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (red) (A) and the forebrain-related membranar marker Forse1 (red) (B). Green, tau-stained neurons and blue, Hoechst 33342 stained nuclei. Scale bar: 20 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373340&req=5

fig01: Generation of neurons from hES cell derived forebrain-like progenitors. Neural progenitors and neurons derived from hES cells after 22 days of differentiation in vitro, expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (red) (A) and the forebrain-related membranar marker Forse1 (red) (B). Green, tau-stained neurons and blue, Hoechst 33342 stained nuclei. Scale bar: 20 μm.
Mentions: First, neuroepithelial cells were induced from hES cells, in chemical-defined cell culture conditions, without morphogens, and they acquired an anterior phenotype [5–7]. They differentiated into neural progenitor cells expressing the forebrain-related transcription factor FOXG1 (Fig. 1A) and the forebrain membranar marker Forse1 (Fig. 1B), and started to generate neurons (Fig. 1A, B).

Bottom Line: The connection of embryonic stem cell technology and developmental biology provides valuable tools to decipher the mechanisms underlying human brain development and diseases, especially among neuronal populations, that are not readily available in primary cultures.It is obviously the case of neurons forming the human cerebral cortex.In the images that are presented, the neurons were generated in vitro from human embryonic stem cells via forebrain-like progenitors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania. Irina-Roxana.Nat@i-med.ac.at

Show MeSH