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Generation of easily accessible human kidney tubules on two-dimensional surfaces in vitro.

Zhang H, Lau SF, Heng BF, Teo PY, Alahakoon PK, Ni M, Tasnim F, Ying JY, Zink D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Bottom Line: However, after triggering the process, the formation of renal tubules occurs with remarkable independence from the substrate architecture.Human proximal tubules generated on 2D surfaces typically have a length of several millimetres, and are easily accessible for manipulations and imaging, which makes them attractive for basic research and in vitro nephrotoxicology.The experimental system described also allows for in vitro studies on how primary human kidney cells regenerate renal structures after organ disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The Nanos, Singapore, Singapore.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Tubulogenesis in capillaries. HPTCs are seeded into glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 580 μm. (A) and (B) show two different capillaries containing HPTCs imaged ∼2 weeks after seeding. Several images were stitched together in order to cover a larger area. Initially after seeding, monolayers covering the inner walls of the capillaries are formed. The monolayer is still intact in the left half of the lower capillary (B). Myofibroblast aggregates appear after monolayer formation. The monolayer is then rearranged and detached from the capillary walls, and tubules are formed within the capillaries (marked by arrows), which are attached to myofibroblast aggregates (marked by arrowheads). Scale bar: 1 mm.
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fig08: Tubulogenesis in capillaries. HPTCs are seeded into glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 580 μm. (A) and (B) show two different capillaries containing HPTCs imaged ∼2 weeks after seeding. Several images were stitched together in order to cover a larger area. Initially after seeding, monolayers covering the inner walls of the capillaries are formed. The monolayer is still intact in the left half of the lower capillary (B). Myofibroblast aggregates appear after monolayer formation. The monolayer is then rearranged and detached from the capillary walls, and tubules are formed within the capillaries (marked by arrows), which are attached to myofibroblast aggregates (marked by arrowheads). Scale bar: 1 mm.

Mentions: Figure 8 shows that HPTCs formed tubules within capillaries. These results demonstrated that tubule formation was not inhibited by arranging HPTCs into a pre-formed tubular architecture. Tubule formation within capillaries was accomplished by the same process as employed on 2D surfaces, involving monolayer formation and subsequent appearance of myofibroblast aggregates. Obviously, this process would lead to hollow fibre clogging in BAKs. The results also revealed that lateral attachment to a rigid substrate was not important for the sensing of a 3D environment. Three-dimensional edges were probably sensed indirectly through the impact of the substrate architecture on surface tension and fluid dynamics of the medium [35].


Generation of easily accessible human kidney tubules on two-dimensional surfaces in vitro.

Zhang H, Lau SF, Heng BF, Teo PY, Alahakoon PK, Ni M, Tasnim F, Ying JY, Zink D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Tubulogenesis in capillaries. HPTCs are seeded into glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 580 μm. (A) and (B) show two different capillaries containing HPTCs imaged ∼2 weeks after seeding. Several images were stitched together in order to cover a larger area. Initially after seeding, monolayers covering the inner walls of the capillaries are formed. The monolayer is still intact in the left half of the lower capillary (B). Myofibroblast aggregates appear after monolayer formation. The monolayer is then rearranged and detached from the capillary walls, and tubules are formed within the capillaries (marked by arrows), which are attached to myofibroblast aggregates (marked by arrowheads). Scale bar: 1 mm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373329&req=5

fig08: Tubulogenesis in capillaries. HPTCs are seeded into glass capillaries with an inner diameter of 580 μm. (A) and (B) show two different capillaries containing HPTCs imaged ∼2 weeks after seeding. Several images were stitched together in order to cover a larger area. Initially after seeding, monolayers covering the inner walls of the capillaries are formed. The monolayer is still intact in the left half of the lower capillary (B). Myofibroblast aggregates appear after monolayer formation. The monolayer is then rearranged and detached from the capillary walls, and tubules are formed within the capillaries (marked by arrows), which are attached to myofibroblast aggregates (marked by arrowheads). Scale bar: 1 mm.
Mentions: Figure 8 shows that HPTCs formed tubules within capillaries. These results demonstrated that tubule formation was not inhibited by arranging HPTCs into a pre-formed tubular architecture. Tubule formation within capillaries was accomplished by the same process as employed on 2D surfaces, involving monolayer formation and subsequent appearance of myofibroblast aggregates. Obviously, this process would lead to hollow fibre clogging in BAKs. The results also revealed that lateral attachment to a rigid substrate was not important for the sensing of a 3D environment. Three-dimensional edges were probably sensed indirectly through the impact of the substrate architecture on surface tension and fluid dynamics of the medium [35].

Bottom Line: However, after triggering the process, the formation of renal tubules occurs with remarkable independence from the substrate architecture.Human proximal tubules generated on 2D surfaces typically have a length of several millimetres, and are easily accessible for manipulations and imaging, which makes them attractive for basic research and in vitro nephrotoxicology.The experimental system described also allows for in vitro studies on how primary human kidney cells regenerate renal structures after organ disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The Nanos, Singapore, Singapore.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus