Limits...
Generation of easily accessible human kidney tubules on two-dimensional surfaces in vitro.

Zhang H, Lau SF, Heng BF, Teo PY, Alahakoon PK, Ni M, Tasnim F, Ying JY, Zink D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Bottom Line: However, after triggering the process, the formation of renal tubules occurs with remarkable independence from the substrate architecture.Human proximal tubules generated on 2D surfaces typically have a length of several millimetres, and are easily accessible for manipulations and imaging, which makes them attractive for basic research and in vitro nephrotoxicology.The experimental system described also allows for in vitro studies on how primary human kidney cells regenerate renal structures after organ disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The Nanos, Singapore, Singapore.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Sensing of a 3D edge triggers tubulogenesis. (A and B) show two wells of 24-well plates with HPTCs. Multiple tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates (two of these structures are marked by arrows) are present within these wells (well diameter = 15 mm). The tubules always display a similar distance from the edge, which leads to the generation of ring-like structures consisting of tubules. (C and D) show initial retraction of the monolayer starting at the edge the wells. Uneven illumination is due to optical effects at the edge. The direction where the edge is located is indicated by large arrowheads, and part of the edge is visible in the upper right corner in (C). A part of the monolayer is visible in the lower left corner in (C). All cells of the monolayer moved simultaneously from the edge towards the centre, leaving an almost void surface behind. (D) shows a cell layer that retracted from the edge. Here, coordinated retraction from the opposite side has started, which breaks up the cell layer (marked by small arrowheads) at defined distances from the outer rim. Scale bars: (A, B) 3 mm and (C, D) 500 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373329&req=5

fig06: Sensing of a 3D edge triggers tubulogenesis. (A and B) show two wells of 24-well plates with HPTCs. Multiple tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates (two of these structures are marked by arrows) are present within these wells (well diameter = 15 mm). The tubules always display a similar distance from the edge, which leads to the generation of ring-like structures consisting of tubules. (C and D) show initial retraction of the monolayer starting at the edge the wells. Uneven illumination is due to optical effects at the edge. The direction where the edge is located is indicated by large arrowheads, and part of the edge is visible in the upper right corner in (C). A part of the monolayer is visible in the lower left corner in (C). All cells of the monolayer moved simultaneously from the edge towards the centre, leaving an almost void surface behind. (D) shows a cell layer that retracted from the edge. Here, coordinated retraction from the opposite side has started, which breaks up the cell layer (marked by small arrowheads) at defined distances from the outer rim. Scale bars: (A, B) 3 mm and (C, D) 500 μm.

Mentions: Although renal tubule formation occurred on 2D surfaces, several observations suggested that formation of 3D tissue-like structures by HPTCs was enhanced by a 3D substrate architecture. Most striking was the finding that a closed circle formed by several tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates could be formed within a well close to its edge, with all tubules displaying a similar distance to the edge (Fig. 6A, B). By contrast to the centre of the well, the edge of the well has a 3D architecture. Another observation suggesting a crucial role for a 3D architecture in enhancing tubule formation was that initial retraction of the epithelial monolayer started in most cases first at the edge of the well (Fig. 6C, D).


Generation of easily accessible human kidney tubules on two-dimensional surfaces in vitro.

Zhang H, Lau SF, Heng BF, Teo PY, Alahakoon PK, Ni M, Tasnim F, Ying JY, Zink D - J. Cell. Mol. Med. (2010)

Sensing of a 3D edge triggers tubulogenesis. (A and B) show two wells of 24-well plates with HPTCs. Multiple tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates (two of these structures are marked by arrows) are present within these wells (well diameter = 15 mm). The tubules always display a similar distance from the edge, which leads to the generation of ring-like structures consisting of tubules. (C and D) show initial retraction of the monolayer starting at the edge the wells. Uneven illumination is due to optical effects at the edge. The direction where the edge is located is indicated by large arrowheads, and part of the edge is visible in the upper right corner in (C). A part of the monolayer is visible in the lower left corner in (C). All cells of the monolayer moved simultaneously from the edge towards the centre, leaving an almost void surface behind. (D) shows a cell layer that retracted from the edge. Here, coordinated retraction from the opposite side has started, which breaks up the cell layer (marked by small arrowheads) at defined distances from the outer rim. Scale bars: (A, B) 3 mm and (C, D) 500 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373329&req=5

fig06: Sensing of a 3D edge triggers tubulogenesis. (A and B) show two wells of 24-well plates with HPTCs. Multiple tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates (two of these structures are marked by arrows) are present within these wells (well diameter = 15 mm). The tubules always display a similar distance from the edge, which leads to the generation of ring-like structures consisting of tubules. (C and D) show initial retraction of the monolayer starting at the edge the wells. Uneven illumination is due to optical effects at the edge. The direction where the edge is located is indicated by large arrowheads, and part of the edge is visible in the upper right corner in (C). A part of the monolayer is visible in the lower left corner in (C). All cells of the monolayer moved simultaneously from the edge towards the centre, leaving an almost void surface behind. (D) shows a cell layer that retracted from the edge. Here, coordinated retraction from the opposite side has started, which breaks up the cell layer (marked by small arrowheads) at defined distances from the outer rim. Scale bars: (A, B) 3 mm and (C, D) 500 μm.
Mentions: Although renal tubule formation occurred on 2D surfaces, several observations suggested that formation of 3D tissue-like structures by HPTCs was enhanced by a 3D substrate architecture. Most striking was the finding that a closed circle formed by several tubules with attached myofibroblast aggregates could be formed within a well close to its edge, with all tubules displaying a similar distance to the edge (Fig. 6A, B). By contrast to the centre of the well, the edge of the well has a 3D architecture. Another observation suggesting a crucial role for a 3D architecture in enhancing tubule formation was that initial retraction of the epithelial monolayer started in most cases first at the edge of the well (Fig. 6C, D).

Bottom Line: However, after triggering the process, the formation of renal tubules occurs with remarkable independence from the substrate architecture.Human proximal tubules generated on 2D surfaces typically have a length of several millimetres, and are easily accessible for manipulations and imaging, which makes them attractive for basic research and in vitro nephrotoxicology.The experimental system described also allows for in vitro studies on how primary human kidney cells regenerate renal structures after organ disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, The Nanos, Singapore, Singapore.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus