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Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey.

Price D, Fletcher M, van der Molen T - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised.Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, and previous studies have reported low levels of control. Recent developments in the availability and use of online sources of information about asthma might add to patients' knowledge and help improve control.

Aims: To investigate whether asthma control has improved by assessing levels of symptoms, exacerbations and Global Initiative for Asthma-defined control in a real-life population of patients who use the Internet and social media, as well as evaluate patient perception of control and attitudes to asthma.

Methods: Online surveys were conducted among 8,000 patients with asthma (aged 18-50 years, ≥2 prescriptions in the previous 2 years, use of social media) from 11 European countries.

Results: Levels of asthma control were low: 45% of respondents had uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More than 80% of respondents (overall, and among those with a history of exacerbations) considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.

Conclusions: Asthma control in Europe remains poor; symptoms and exacerbations are common. Many patients regard their asthma as controlled and not serious despite experiencing symptoms and exacerbations. There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Daily use of preventer medication. Q: Which statement best describes how you take your regular asthma treatment? This is your preventer inhaler, which is usually brown, orange or red. Base: respondents taking a preventer inhaler (overall: n=3,481; Global Initiative for Asthma-defined controlled: n=620; partially controlled: n=1,171; uncontrolled: n=1,690).
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fig3: Daily use of preventer medication. Q: Which statement best describes how you take your regular asthma treatment? This is your preventer inhaler, which is usually brown, orange or red. Base: respondents taking a preventer inhaler (overall: n=3,481; Global Initiative for Asthma-defined controlled: n=620; partially controlled: n=1,171; uncontrolled: n=1,690).

Mentions: The majority of respondents were fairly or very confident about managing their asthma (91.7%) and felt they had ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ knowledge about its treatment (75.3%). Over half of any respondents who stated that they had a preventer inhaler did not use it every day as prescribed (Figure 3). The most common reasons selected for non-adherence (base, n=1,401) were not seeing the need to take it (50.0%) or forgetting (18.6%). More than one-quarter of respondents felt embarrassed about their inhaler, and two out of five considered it a nuisance (Figure 4). Overall, 52.7% of respondents had not had their inhaler technique checked by an HCP in the previous 12 months.


Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey.

Price D, Fletcher M, van der Molen T - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Daily use of preventer medication. Q: Which statement best describes how you take your regular asthma treatment? This is your preventer inhaler, which is usually brown, orange or red. Base: respondents taking a preventer inhaler (overall: n=3,481; Global Initiative for Asthma-defined controlled: n=620; partially controlled: n=1,171; uncontrolled: n=1,690).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373302&req=5

fig3: Daily use of preventer medication. Q: Which statement best describes how you take your regular asthma treatment? This is your preventer inhaler, which is usually brown, orange or red. Base: respondents taking a preventer inhaler (overall: n=3,481; Global Initiative for Asthma-defined controlled: n=620; partially controlled: n=1,171; uncontrolled: n=1,690).
Mentions: The majority of respondents were fairly or very confident about managing their asthma (91.7%) and felt they had ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ knowledge about its treatment (75.3%). Over half of any respondents who stated that they had a preventer inhaler did not use it every day as prescribed (Figure 3). The most common reasons selected for non-adherence (base, n=1,401) were not seeing the need to take it (50.0%) or forgetting (18.6%). More than one-quarter of respondents felt embarrassed about their inhaler, and two out of five considered it a nuisance (Figure 4). Overall, 52.7% of respondents had not had their inhaler technique checked by an HCP in the previous 12 months.

Bottom Line: Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised.Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, and previous studies have reported low levels of control. Recent developments in the availability and use of online sources of information about asthma might add to patients' knowledge and help improve control.

Aims: To investigate whether asthma control has improved by assessing levels of symptoms, exacerbations and Global Initiative for Asthma-defined control in a real-life population of patients who use the Internet and social media, as well as evaluate patient perception of control and attitudes to asthma.

Methods: Online surveys were conducted among 8,000 patients with asthma (aged 18-50 years, ≥2 prescriptions in the previous 2 years, use of social media) from 11 European countries.

Results: Levels of asthma control were low: 45% of respondents had uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More than 80% of respondents (overall, and among those with a history of exacerbations) considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.

Conclusions: Asthma control in Europe remains poor; symptoms and exacerbations are common. Many patients regard their asthma as controlled and not serious despite experiencing symptoms and exacerbations. There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus