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Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey.

Price D, Fletcher M, van der Molen T - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Bottom Line: Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised.Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, and previous studies have reported low levels of control. Recent developments in the availability and use of online sources of information about asthma might add to patients' knowledge and help improve control.

Aims: To investigate whether asthma control has improved by assessing levels of symptoms, exacerbations and Global Initiative for Asthma-defined control in a real-life population of patients who use the Internet and social media, as well as evaluate patient perception of control and attitudes to asthma.

Methods: Online surveys were conducted among 8,000 patients with asthma (aged 18-50 years, ≥2 prescriptions in the previous 2 years, use of social media) from 11 European countries.

Results: Levels of asthma control were low: 45% of respondents had uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More than 80% of respondents (overall, and among those with a history of exacerbations) considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.

Conclusions: Asthma control in Europe remains poor; symptoms and exacerbations are common. Many patients regard their asthma as controlled and not serious despite experiencing symptoms and exacerbations. There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Survey design. aParticipants were excluded if they failed one or more screening questions (see Methods). bData shown for individual answers to screening questions; 49,717 respondents answered all screening questions before being screened and hence the total number of reasons for exclusion exceeds 69,646.
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fig1: Survey design. aParticipants were excluded if they failed one or more screening questions (see Methods). bData shown for individual answers to screening questions; 49,717 respondents answered all screening questions before being screened and hence the total number of reasons for exclusion exceeds 69,646.

Mentions: The survey population was drawn from validated consumer panels, which were mainly recruited online (Watermelon Research, London, UK). In Norway and Finland, recruitment was supplemented by press advertising. Approximately 590,740 members of the general public (regardless of asthma status) who had previously registered on consumer panels and had agreed to take part in market research were sent an e-mail inviting them to participate. The invitation described the survey as ‘health related’, but did not mention asthma. Those who clicked the link to start the questionnaire were asked screening questions to ensure that they had asthma and met the other inclusion criteria (Figure 1); eligible participants were then able to complete the full questionnaire. Upon completion of the survey, respondents immediately received a reward in a points-based incentive scheme. Of the 88,611 individuals who responded, the first 38,894 were excluded as soon as they failed a screening question; the process was subsequently amended to streamline recruitment and enrolment, and all other respondents (n=49,717) answered all screening questions before being excluded; this technical amendment did not affect the outcome of the screening. The target survey population was 8,000; this sample size was chosen to provide a sufficiently large and robust population across the different countries. Additional respondents were not recruited once this number was achieved.


Asthma control and management in 8,000 European patients: the REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience (REALISE) survey.

Price D, Fletcher M, van der Molen T - NPJ Prim Care Respir Med (2014)

Survey design. aParticipants were excluded if they failed one or more screening questions (see Methods). bData shown for individual answers to screening questions; 49,717 respondents answered all screening questions before being screened and hence the total number of reasons for exclusion exceeds 69,646.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373302&req=5

fig1: Survey design. aParticipants were excluded if they failed one or more screening questions (see Methods). bData shown for individual answers to screening questions; 49,717 respondents answered all screening questions before being screened and hence the total number of reasons for exclusion exceeds 69,646.
Mentions: The survey population was drawn from validated consumer panels, which were mainly recruited online (Watermelon Research, London, UK). In Norway and Finland, recruitment was supplemented by press advertising. Approximately 590,740 members of the general public (regardless of asthma status) who had previously registered on consumer panels and had agreed to take part in market research were sent an e-mail inviting them to participate. The invitation described the survey as ‘health related’, but did not mention asthma. Those who clicked the link to start the questionnaire were asked screening questions to ensure that they had asthma and met the other inclusion criteria (Figure 1); eligible participants were then able to complete the full questionnaire. Upon completion of the survey, respondents immediately received a reward in a points-based incentive scheme. Of the 88,611 individuals who responded, the first 38,894 were excluded as soon as they failed a screening question; the process was subsequently amended to streamline recruitment and enrolment, and all other respondents (n=49,717) answered all screening questions before being excluded; this technical amendment did not affect the outcome of the screening. The target survey population was 8,000; this sample size was chosen to provide a sufficiently large and robust population across the different countries. Additional respondents were not recruited once this number was achieved.

Bottom Line: Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised.Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre of Academic Primary Care, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases in the world, and previous studies have reported low levels of control. Recent developments in the availability and use of online sources of information about asthma might add to patients' knowledge and help improve control.

Aims: To investigate whether asthma control has improved by assessing levels of symptoms, exacerbations and Global Initiative for Asthma-defined control in a real-life population of patients who use the Internet and social media, as well as evaluate patient perception of control and attitudes to asthma.

Methods: Online surveys were conducted among 8,000 patients with asthma (aged 18-50 years, ≥2 prescriptions in the previous 2 years, use of social media) from 11 European countries.

Results: Levels of asthma control were low: 45% of respondents had uncontrolled asthma. Acute exacerbations were common: 44% of respondents reported having used oral steroids for asthma in the previous 12 months, 24% had visited an emergency department and 12% had been hospitalised. More than 80% of respondents (overall, and among those with a history of exacerbations) considered their asthma to be controlled. Of those who had an exacerbation requiring oral steroids, 75% regarded their asthma as not serious.

Conclusions: Asthma control in Europe remains poor; symptoms and exacerbations are common. Many patients regard their asthma as controlled and not serious despite experiencing symptoms and exacerbations. There is a need to assess patients' control, risk and inhaler technique, and to ensure that patients are prescribed, and take, appropriate treatments.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus