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Processing changes when listening to foreign-accented speech.

Romero-Rivas C, Martin CD, Costa A - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, during native speech comprehension, semantic violations in the critical words elicited an N400 effect followed by a late positivity.During foreign-accented speech comprehension, semantic violations only elicited an N400 effect.Moreover, these results suggest that lexical access, semantic integration and linguistic re-analysis processes are permeable to external factors, such as the accent of the speaker.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Speech Production and Bilingualism, Center for Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study investigates the mechanisms responsible for fast changes in processing foreign-accented speech. Event Related brain Potentials (ERPs) were obtained while native speakers of Spanish listened to native and foreign-accented speakers of Spanish. We observed a less positive P200 component for foreign-accented speech relative to native speech comprehension. This suggests that the extraction of spectral information and other important acoustic features was hampered during foreign-accented speech comprehension. However, the amplitude of the N400 component for foreign-accented speech comprehension decreased across the experiment, suggesting the use of a higher level, lexical mechanism. Furthermore, during native speech comprehension, semantic violations in the critical words elicited an N400 effect followed by a late positivity. During foreign-accented speech comprehension, semantic violations only elicited an N400 effect. Overall, our results suggest that, despite a lack of improvement in phonetic discrimination, native listeners experience changes at lexical-semantic levels of processing after brief exposure to foreign-accented speech. Moreover, these results suggest that lexical access, semantic integration and linguistic re-analysis processes are permeable to external factors, such as the accent of the speaker.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Grand average ERPs from C1, Cz and C2 electrodes for the first word of the sentences of Blocks 1 and 2 during native (blue line) and foreign-accented (orange line) speech. Grand average images were extracted at 200 ms before (baseline) and lasting until 600 ms after the onset of the words.
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Figure 2: Grand average ERPs from C1, Cz and C2 electrodes for the first word of the sentences of Blocks 1 and 2 during native (blue line) and foreign-accented (orange line) speech. Grand average images were extracted at 200 ms before (baseline) and lasting until 600 ms after the onset of the words.

Mentions: In sum, this analysis revealed that the mean amplitude of the P200 component for native speech was more positive than for foreign-accented speech across the experiment (Figure 2). This suggests that the extraction of phonetic/acoustic information was easier during native speech as compared to foreign-accented speech comprehension throughout the experimental session.


Processing changes when listening to foreign-accented speech.

Romero-Rivas C, Martin CD, Costa A - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Grand average ERPs from C1, Cz and C2 electrodes for the first word of the sentences of Blocks 1 and 2 during native (blue line) and foreign-accented (orange line) speech. Grand average images were extracted at 200 ms before (baseline) and lasting until 600 ms after the onset of the words.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373278&req=5

Figure 2: Grand average ERPs from C1, Cz and C2 electrodes for the first word of the sentences of Blocks 1 and 2 during native (blue line) and foreign-accented (orange line) speech. Grand average images were extracted at 200 ms before (baseline) and lasting until 600 ms after the onset of the words.
Mentions: In sum, this analysis revealed that the mean amplitude of the P200 component for native speech was more positive than for foreign-accented speech across the experiment (Figure 2). This suggests that the extraction of phonetic/acoustic information was easier during native speech as compared to foreign-accented speech comprehension throughout the experimental session.

Bottom Line: Furthermore, during native speech comprehension, semantic violations in the critical words elicited an N400 effect followed by a late positivity.During foreign-accented speech comprehension, semantic violations only elicited an N400 effect.Moreover, these results suggest that lexical access, semantic integration and linguistic re-analysis processes are permeable to external factors, such as the accent of the speaker.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Speech Production and Bilingualism, Center for Brain and Cognition, Universitat Pompeu Fabra Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
This study investigates the mechanisms responsible for fast changes in processing foreign-accented speech. Event Related brain Potentials (ERPs) were obtained while native speakers of Spanish listened to native and foreign-accented speakers of Spanish. We observed a less positive P200 component for foreign-accented speech relative to native speech comprehension. This suggests that the extraction of spectral information and other important acoustic features was hampered during foreign-accented speech comprehension. However, the amplitude of the N400 component for foreign-accented speech comprehension decreased across the experiment, suggesting the use of a higher level, lexical mechanism. Furthermore, during native speech comprehension, semantic violations in the critical words elicited an N400 effect followed by a late positivity. During foreign-accented speech comprehension, semantic violations only elicited an N400 effect. Overall, our results suggest that, despite a lack of improvement in phonetic discrimination, native listeners experience changes at lexical-semantic levels of processing after brief exposure to foreign-accented speech. Moreover, these results suggest that lexical access, semantic integration and linguistic re-analysis processes are permeable to external factors, such as the accent of the speaker.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus