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Temporal self-regulation theory: a neurobiologically informed model for physical activity behavior.

Hall PA, Fong GT - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function (EF) and the performance of physical activity behavior.Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)) are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself.The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practice, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo Waterloo, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Dominant explanatory models for physical activity behavior are limited by the exclusion of several important components, including temporal dynamics, ecological forces, and neurobiological factors. The latter may be a critical omission, given the relevance of several aspects of cognitive function for the self-regulatory processes that are likely required for consistent implementation of physical activity behavior in everyday life. This narrative review introduces temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Hall and Fong, 2007, 2013) as a new explanatory model for physical activity behavior. Important features of the model include consideration of the default status of the physical activity behavior, as well as the disproportionate influence of temporally proximal behavioral contingencies. Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function (EF) and the performance of physical activity behavior. Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)) are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself. The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practice, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

No MeSH data available.


Temporal self-regulation theory for physical activity (TST-PA). Note: PA = physical activity. Solid arrows indicate major causal pathways; dotted lines represent secondary causal pathways representing cumulative effects over time. * = temporally weighted.
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Figure 2: Temporal self-regulation theory for physical activity (TST-PA). Note: PA = physical activity. Solid arrows indicate major causal pathways; dotted lines represent secondary causal pathways representing cumulative effects over time. * = temporally weighted.

Mentions: Temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Figure 2) was introduced to account for the limitations of some of the existing social cognitive models of health behavior, including the lack of neurobiological factors such as EF (Hall and Fong, 2007, 2013). Briefly, the model posits that there are three proximal determinants of behavior: intention, prepotency and EF. The proximal model is in turn modulated by the ecological context, such that EF and prepotency become increasingly important causal links under conditions where the behavior is performed in an unsupportive environment (i.e., where there is large disjunction between when the costs and benefits for the behavior are incurred). In the absence of such temporal disjunction—a purely theoretical state of affairs that rarely exists for health related behaviors—the intention-behavior link would be assumed to be uniform and not moderated by prepotency or executive control (i.e., intentions are perfectly translatable into behavior). Intention in turn is determined by beliefs and values attached to the behavior based on many sources, including personal history with the behavior, but also other exogenous forces.


Temporal self-regulation theory: a neurobiologically informed model for physical activity behavior.

Hall PA, Fong GT - Front Hum Neurosci (2015)

Temporal self-regulation theory for physical activity (TST-PA). Note: PA = physical activity. Solid arrows indicate major causal pathways; dotted lines represent secondary causal pathways representing cumulative effects over time. * = temporally weighted.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373277&req=5

Figure 2: Temporal self-regulation theory for physical activity (TST-PA). Note: PA = physical activity. Solid arrows indicate major causal pathways; dotted lines represent secondary causal pathways representing cumulative effects over time. * = temporally weighted.
Mentions: Temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Figure 2) was introduced to account for the limitations of some of the existing social cognitive models of health behavior, including the lack of neurobiological factors such as EF (Hall and Fong, 2007, 2013). Briefly, the model posits that there are three proximal determinants of behavior: intention, prepotency and EF. The proximal model is in turn modulated by the ecological context, such that EF and prepotency become increasingly important causal links under conditions where the behavior is performed in an unsupportive environment (i.e., where there is large disjunction between when the costs and benefits for the behavior are incurred). In the absence of such temporal disjunction—a purely theoretical state of affairs that rarely exists for health related behaviors—the intention-behavior link would be assumed to be uniform and not moderated by prepotency or executive control (i.e., intentions are perfectly translatable into behavior). Intention in turn is determined by beliefs and values attached to the behavior based on many sources, including personal history with the behavior, but also other exogenous forces.

Bottom Line: Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function (EF) and the performance of physical activity behavior.Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)) are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself.The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practice, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Applied Health Sciences, University of Waterloo Waterloo, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Dominant explanatory models for physical activity behavior are limited by the exclusion of several important components, including temporal dynamics, ecological forces, and neurobiological factors. The latter may be a critical omission, given the relevance of several aspects of cognitive function for the self-regulatory processes that are likely required for consistent implementation of physical activity behavior in everyday life. This narrative review introduces temporal self-regulation theory (TST; Hall and Fong, 2007, 2013) as a new explanatory model for physical activity behavior. Important features of the model include consideration of the default status of the physical activity behavior, as well as the disproportionate influence of temporally proximal behavioral contingencies. Most importantly, the TST model proposes positive feedback loops linking executive function (EF) and the performance of physical activity behavior. Specifically, those with relatively stronger executive control (and optimized brain structures supporting it, such as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC)) are able to implement physical activity with more consistency than others, which in turn serves to strengthen the executive control network itself. The TST model has the potential to explain everyday variants of incidental physical activity, sport-related excellence via capacity for deliberate practice, and variability in the propensity to schedule and implement exercise routines.

No MeSH data available.