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AuthorSynth: a collaboration network and behaviorally-based visualization tool of activation reports from the neuroscience literature.

Sochat VV - Front Neuroinform (2015)

Bottom Line: We present "AuthorSynth," a novel application prototype that includes (1) a collaboration network to identify researchers with similar results reported in the literature; and (2) a 2D plot-"brain lattice"-to visually summarize a single author's contribution to the field, and allow for searching of authors based on behavioral terms.This method capitalizes on intelligent synthesis of the neuroimaging literature, and demonstrates that data-driven approaches can be used to confirm existing collaborations, reveal potential ones, and identify gaps in published knowledge.We believe this tool exemplifies how methods from neuroimaging informatics can better inform researchers about progress and knowledge in the field, and enhance the modern workflow of finding collaborations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Biomedical Informatics, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Targeted collaboration is becoming more challenging with the ever-increasing number of publications, conferences, and academic responsibilities that the modern-day researcher must synthesize. Specifically, the field of neuroimaging had roughly 10,000 new papers in PubMed for the year 2013, presenting tens of thousands of international authors, each a potential collaborator working on some sub-domain in the field. To remove the burden of synthesizing an entire corpus of publications, talks, and conference interactions to find and assess collaborations, we combine meta-analytical neuroimaging informatics methods with machine learning and network analysis toward this goal. We present "AuthorSynth," a novel application prototype that includes (1) a collaboration network to identify researchers with similar results reported in the literature; and (2) a 2D plot-"brain lattice"-to visually summarize a single author's contribution to the field, and allow for searching of authors based on behavioral terms. This method capitalizes on intelligent synthesis of the neuroimaging literature, and demonstrates that data-driven approaches can be used to confirm existing collaborations, reveal potential ones, and identify gaps in published knowledge. We believe this tool exemplifies how methods from neuroimaging informatics can better inform researchers about progress and knowledge in the field, and enhance the modern workflow of finding collaborations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of Brain Lattice. An example “brain lattice” for researcher Ahmad R Hariri, Director of the Laboratory of NeuroGenetics at Duke University. Professor Hariri studies neural circuits supporting threat and reward processing, and so his map reflects this work with “hot” spots around terms related to depression, anxiety, emotional reactivity, and decision making.
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Figure 3: Example of Brain Lattice. An example “brain lattice” for researcher Ahmad R Hariri, Director of the Laboratory of NeuroGenetics at Duke University. Professor Hariri studies neural circuits supporting threat and reward processing, and so his map reflects this work with “hot” spots around terms related to depression, anxiety, emotional reactivity, and decision making.

Mentions: We generated behavioral brain term maps for a set of 525 psychologically-relevant terms included in the base NeuroSynth data repository (version 0.x) (Yarkoni et al., 2011). We used the SOM to map these 3D images onto a 2D space, as described in methods Section Mapping Author Brain Maps to Psychologically-Relevant Brain Maps. The finished brain lattice, colored to show similar portions of the map, is shown in the top left panel of Figure 2. Finally, we mapped each author brain map to this space, and projected match scores onto a color gradient to define a unique mapping for each author, with “hot” colors corresponding to higher match scores, and cooler colors to lower match scores. A detailed brain lattice defined for researcher Ahmad Hariri is included in Figure 3.


AuthorSynth: a collaboration network and behaviorally-based visualization tool of activation reports from the neuroscience literature.

Sochat VV - Front Neuroinform (2015)

Example of Brain Lattice. An example “brain lattice” for researcher Ahmad R Hariri, Director of the Laboratory of NeuroGenetics at Duke University. Professor Hariri studies neural circuits supporting threat and reward processing, and so his map reflects this work with “hot” spots around terms related to depression, anxiety, emotional reactivity, and decision making.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373276&req=5

Figure 3: Example of Brain Lattice. An example “brain lattice” for researcher Ahmad R Hariri, Director of the Laboratory of NeuroGenetics at Duke University. Professor Hariri studies neural circuits supporting threat and reward processing, and so his map reflects this work with “hot” spots around terms related to depression, anxiety, emotional reactivity, and decision making.
Mentions: We generated behavioral brain term maps for a set of 525 psychologically-relevant terms included in the base NeuroSynth data repository (version 0.x) (Yarkoni et al., 2011). We used the SOM to map these 3D images onto a 2D space, as described in methods Section Mapping Author Brain Maps to Psychologically-Relevant Brain Maps. The finished brain lattice, colored to show similar portions of the map, is shown in the top left panel of Figure 2. Finally, we mapped each author brain map to this space, and projected match scores onto a color gradient to define a unique mapping for each author, with “hot” colors corresponding to higher match scores, and cooler colors to lower match scores. A detailed brain lattice defined for researcher Ahmad Hariri is included in Figure 3.

Bottom Line: We present "AuthorSynth," a novel application prototype that includes (1) a collaboration network to identify researchers with similar results reported in the literature; and (2) a 2D plot-"brain lattice"-to visually summarize a single author's contribution to the field, and allow for searching of authors based on behavioral terms.This method capitalizes on intelligent synthesis of the neuroimaging literature, and demonstrates that data-driven approaches can be used to confirm existing collaborations, reveal potential ones, and identify gaps in published knowledge.We believe this tool exemplifies how methods from neuroimaging informatics can better inform researchers about progress and knowledge in the field, and enhance the modern workflow of finding collaborations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Program in Biomedical Informatics, Stanford University Stanford, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Targeted collaboration is becoming more challenging with the ever-increasing number of publications, conferences, and academic responsibilities that the modern-day researcher must synthesize. Specifically, the field of neuroimaging had roughly 10,000 new papers in PubMed for the year 2013, presenting tens of thousands of international authors, each a potential collaborator working on some sub-domain in the field. To remove the burden of synthesizing an entire corpus of publications, talks, and conference interactions to find and assess collaborations, we combine meta-analytical neuroimaging informatics methods with machine learning and network analysis toward this goal. We present "AuthorSynth," a novel application prototype that includes (1) a collaboration network to identify researchers with similar results reported in the literature; and (2) a 2D plot-"brain lattice"-to visually summarize a single author's contribution to the field, and allow for searching of authors based on behavioral terms. This method capitalizes on intelligent synthesis of the neuroimaging literature, and demonstrates that data-driven approaches can be used to confirm existing collaborations, reveal potential ones, and identify gaps in published knowledge. We believe this tool exemplifies how methods from neuroimaging informatics can better inform researchers about progress and knowledge in the field, and enhance the modern workflow of finding collaborations.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus