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Cognitive skills and reading in adults with Usher syndrome type 2.

Henricson C, Lidestam B, Lyxell B, Möller C - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing.The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment.These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR) Linköping, Sweden ; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Linköping, Sweden ; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University Linköping, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate working memory (WM), phonological skills, lexical skills, and reading comprehension in adults with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2).

Design: The participants performed tests of phonological processing, lexical access, WM, and reading comprehension. The design of the test situation and tests was specifically considered for use with persons with low vision in combination with hearing impairment. The performance of the group with USH2 on the different cognitive measures was compared to that of a matched control group with normal hearing and vision (NVH).

Study sample: Thirteen participants with USH2 aged 21-60 years and a control group of 10 individuals with NVH, matched on age and level of education.

Results: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing. There was a larger variation in performance among the individuals with USH2 than in the matched control group.

Conclusion: The performance of the group with USH2 indicated similar problems with phonological processing skills and phonological WM as in individuals with long-term hearing loss. The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment. These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Displaying performance on phonological working memory (percentage correctly recalled consonants on Serial Recall of Non-words), and score (number of correct answers maximum 42) on reading comprehension. Individuals with USH2 are displayed as filled circles and individuals in the control group as triangles.
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Figure 4: Displaying performance on phonological working memory (percentage correctly recalled consonants on Serial Recall of Non-words), and score (number of correct answers maximum 42) on reading comprehension. Individuals with USH2 are displayed as filled circles and individuals in the control group as triangles.

Mentions: The control group displayed both higher percentage of correct consonants in the recalled non-words U= 101.50, z = 2.42, p = 0.02, r = 0.50 (USH2: M = 42.1 and SD = 11.9; NHV: M = 56.7 and SD = 12.5) and longer span length, U= 103.50, z = 2.39, p = 0.02, r = 0.50 (USH2: M = 3.9 and SD = 0.9; NHV: M = 4.9 and SD = 1.0; see Table 2, and Figure 4, for details on performance in the groups). Ten of the participants with USH2 had performance at or below 50% consonants correct, compared to two in the control group. Four of the participants with USH2 had a recalled longest sequence at or below four words, while none of the participants in the control group were below this span length.


Cognitive skills and reading in adults with Usher syndrome type 2.

Henricson C, Lidestam B, Lyxell B, Möller C - Front Psychol (2015)

Displaying performance on phonological working memory (percentage correctly recalled consonants on Serial Recall of Non-words), and score (number of correct answers maximum 42) on reading comprehension. Individuals with USH2 are displayed as filled circles and individuals in the control group as triangles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373271&req=5

Figure 4: Displaying performance on phonological working memory (percentage correctly recalled consonants on Serial Recall of Non-words), and score (number of correct answers maximum 42) on reading comprehension. Individuals with USH2 are displayed as filled circles and individuals in the control group as triangles.
Mentions: The control group displayed both higher percentage of correct consonants in the recalled non-words U= 101.50, z = 2.42, p = 0.02, r = 0.50 (USH2: M = 42.1 and SD = 11.9; NHV: M = 56.7 and SD = 12.5) and longer span length, U= 103.50, z = 2.39, p = 0.02, r = 0.50 (USH2: M = 3.9 and SD = 0.9; NHV: M = 4.9 and SD = 1.0; see Table 2, and Figure 4, for details on performance in the groups). Ten of the participants with USH2 had performance at or below 50% consonants correct, compared to two in the control group. Four of the participants with USH2 had a recalled longest sequence at or below four words, while none of the participants in the control group were below this span length.

Bottom Line: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing.The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment.These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Institute for Disability Research (SIDR) Linköping, Sweden ; Linnaeus Centre for Research on Hearing and Deafness (HEAD) Linköping, Sweden ; Department of Behavioral Sciences and Learning, Linköping University Linköping, Sweden.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate working memory (WM), phonological skills, lexical skills, and reading comprehension in adults with Usher syndrome type 2 (USH2).

Design: The participants performed tests of phonological processing, lexical access, WM, and reading comprehension. The design of the test situation and tests was specifically considered for use with persons with low vision in combination with hearing impairment. The performance of the group with USH2 on the different cognitive measures was compared to that of a matched control group with normal hearing and vision (NVH).

Study sample: Thirteen participants with USH2 aged 21-60 years and a control group of 10 individuals with NVH, matched on age and level of education.

Results: The group with USH2 displayed significantly lower performance on tests of phonological processing, and on measures requiring both fast visual judgment and phonological processing. There was a larger variation in performance among the individuals with USH2 than in the matched control group.

Conclusion: The performance of the group with USH2 indicated similar problems with phonological processing skills and phonological WM as in individuals with long-term hearing loss. The group with USH2 also had significantly longer reaction times, indicating that processing of visual stimuli is difficult due to the visual impairment. These findings point toward the difficulties in accessing information that persons with USH2 experience, and could be part of the explanation of why individuals with USH2 report high levels of fatigue and feelings of stress (Wahlqvist et al., 2013).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus