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Perception of speech rhythm in second language: the case of rhythmically similar L1 and L2.

Ordin M, Polyanskaya L - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English produced by German learners becomes increasingly stress-timed as acquisition progresses.Advanced learners also deliver speech at a faster rate.However, when native speakers have to classify the timing patterns characteristic of L2 English of German learners at different proficiency levels, they attend to speech rate cues and ignore the differences in speech rhythm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fakultät für Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft, Universität Bielefeld Bielefeld, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the perception of developmental changes in timing patterns that happen in the course of second language (L2) acquisition, provided that the native and the target languages of the learner are rhythmically similar (German and English). It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English produced by German learners becomes increasingly stress-timed as acquisition progresses. This development is captured by the tempo-normalized rhythm measures of durational variability. Advanced learners also deliver speech at a faster rate. However, when native speakers have to classify the timing patterns characteristic of L2 English of German learners at different proficiency levels, they attend to speech rate cues and ignore the differences in speech rhythm.

No MeSH data available.


meanV and meanC for the stimuli identified as Mahutu, Losto, or Burabah. Error bar shows 95% confidence interval.
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Figure 7: meanV and meanC for the stimuli identified as Mahutu, Losto, or Burabah. Error bar shows 95% confidence interval.

Mentions: Figures 5–7 show the differences in the rhythm metrics that significantly differ between stimuli classified into three groups. Only mean durations and non-normalized metrics (rPVI and the standard deviation) differ significantly between the stimuli identifyed as Burabah, Mahutu, and Losto and statistically discriminate between the groups. Rhythm metrics normalized for tempo and %V do not differ between the stimuli classified into three different groups, and do not discriminate between stimuli attributed to different classes.


Perception of speech rhythm in second language: the case of rhythmically similar L1 and L2.

Ordin M, Polyanskaya L - Front Psychol (2015)

meanV and meanC for the stimuli identified as Mahutu, Losto, or Burabah. Error bar shows 95% confidence interval.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373255&req=5

Figure 7: meanV and meanC for the stimuli identified as Mahutu, Losto, or Burabah. Error bar shows 95% confidence interval.
Mentions: Figures 5–7 show the differences in the rhythm metrics that significantly differ between stimuli classified into three groups. Only mean durations and non-normalized metrics (rPVI and the standard deviation) differ significantly between the stimuli identifyed as Burabah, Mahutu, and Losto and statistically discriminate between the groups. Rhythm metrics normalized for tempo and %V do not differ between the stimuli classified into three different groups, and do not discriminate between stimuli attributed to different classes.

Bottom Line: It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English produced by German learners becomes increasingly stress-timed as acquisition progresses.Advanced learners also deliver speech at a faster rate.However, when native speakers have to classify the timing patterns characteristic of L2 English of German learners at different proficiency levels, they attend to speech rate cues and ignore the differences in speech rhythm.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fakultät für Linguistik und Literaturwissenschaft, Universität Bielefeld Bielefeld, Germany.

ABSTRACT
We investigated the perception of developmental changes in timing patterns that happen in the course of second language (L2) acquisition, provided that the native and the target languages of the learner are rhythmically similar (German and English). It was found that speech rhythm in L2 English produced by German learners becomes increasingly stress-timed as acquisition progresses. This development is captured by the tempo-normalized rhythm measures of durational variability. Advanced learners also deliver speech at a faster rate. However, when native speakers have to classify the timing patterns characteristic of L2 English of German learners at different proficiency levels, they attend to speech rate cues and ignore the differences in speech rhythm.

No MeSH data available.