Limits...
Social buffering suppresses fear-associated activation of the lateral amygdala in male rats: behavioral and neurophysiological evidence.

Fuzzo F, Matsumoto J, Kiyokawa Y, Takeuchi Y, Ono T, Nishijo H - Front Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: Although these findings suggest that the presence of a conspecific animal suppresses neural activity in the LA, direct neurophysiological evidence of suppressed activity in the LA during social buffering is still lacking.The presence of a conspecific animal significantly decreased the mean peak amplitudes of auditory evoked field potentials, gamma oscillations (25-75 Hz) and high frequency oscillations (100-300 Hz) in the LA.The results provide the first electrophysiological evidence that social buffering suppresses CS-induced activation in the LA, which consequently reduces conditioned fear responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: System Emotional Science, University of Toyama Sugitani, Toyama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In social mammals, the presence of an affiliative conspecific reduces stress responses, a phenomenon referred to as "social buffering."In a previous study, we found that the presence of a conspecific animal ameliorated a variety of stress responses to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS), including freezing and Fos expression in the lateral amygdala (LA) of male rats. Although these findings suggest that the presence of a conspecific animal suppresses neural activity in the LA, direct neurophysiological evidence of suppressed activity in the LA during social buffering is still lacking. In the present study, we analyzed freezing behavior and local field potentials in the LA of fear-conditioned rats in response to the CS, in the presence or absence of a conspecific. After auditory aversive conditioning, the CS was presented to the conditioned rats in the presence or absence of a conspecific animal, on 2 successive days. The presence of a conspecific animal significantly decreased the mean peak amplitudes of auditory evoked field potentials, gamma oscillations (25-75 Hz) and high frequency oscillations (100-300 Hz) in the LA. Furthermore, magnitudes of these neural responses positively correlated with freezing duration of the fear-conditioned rats. The results provide the first electrophysiological evidence that social buffering suppresses CS-induced activation in the LA, which consequently reduces conditioned fear responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation between neurophysiological responses to the CS and freezing behaviors. Freezing duration positively correlated with AEFP peak amplitude (A), power change of gamma oscillations (B), and power change of HF oscillations (C). Red and blue dots indicate the data from individual rats in the Alone or Social condition, respectively. Values in the figures indicate Pearson's (r, A) and Spearman's correlation coefficients (ρ, B,C), and the corresponding p-values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373252&req=5

Figure 4: Correlation between neurophysiological responses to the CS and freezing behaviors. Freezing duration positively correlated with AEFP peak amplitude (A), power change of gamma oscillations (B), and power change of HF oscillations (C). Red and blue dots indicate the data from individual rats in the Alone or Social condition, respectively. Values in the figures indicate Pearson's (r, A) and Spearman's correlation coefficients (ρ, B,C), and the corresponding p-values.

Mentions: Figure 4 shows the correlation between behavioral and neural responses to the CS. Freezing duration significantly and positively correlated with the peak mean amplitudes of the AEFPs (Figure 4A) (P < 0.01), power change of gamma oscillations (Figure 4B) (P < 0.01), and power change of HF oscillations (Figure 4C) (P < 0.05).


Social buffering suppresses fear-associated activation of the lateral amygdala in male rats: behavioral and neurophysiological evidence.

Fuzzo F, Matsumoto J, Kiyokawa Y, Takeuchi Y, Ono T, Nishijo H - Front Neurosci (2015)

Correlation between neurophysiological responses to the CS and freezing behaviors. Freezing duration positively correlated with AEFP peak amplitude (A), power change of gamma oscillations (B), and power change of HF oscillations (C). Red and blue dots indicate the data from individual rats in the Alone or Social condition, respectively. Values in the figures indicate Pearson's (r, A) and Spearman's correlation coefficients (ρ, B,C), and the corresponding p-values.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373252&req=5

Figure 4: Correlation between neurophysiological responses to the CS and freezing behaviors. Freezing duration positively correlated with AEFP peak amplitude (A), power change of gamma oscillations (B), and power change of HF oscillations (C). Red and blue dots indicate the data from individual rats in the Alone or Social condition, respectively. Values in the figures indicate Pearson's (r, A) and Spearman's correlation coefficients (ρ, B,C), and the corresponding p-values.
Mentions: Figure 4 shows the correlation between behavioral and neural responses to the CS. Freezing duration significantly and positively correlated with the peak mean amplitudes of the AEFPs (Figure 4A) (P < 0.01), power change of gamma oscillations (Figure 4B) (P < 0.01), and power change of HF oscillations (Figure 4C) (P < 0.05).

Bottom Line: Although these findings suggest that the presence of a conspecific animal suppresses neural activity in the LA, direct neurophysiological evidence of suppressed activity in the LA during social buffering is still lacking.The presence of a conspecific animal significantly decreased the mean peak amplitudes of auditory evoked field potentials, gamma oscillations (25-75 Hz) and high frequency oscillations (100-300 Hz) in the LA.The results provide the first electrophysiological evidence that social buffering suppresses CS-induced activation in the LA, which consequently reduces conditioned fear responses.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: System Emotional Science, University of Toyama Sugitani, Toyama, Japan.

ABSTRACT
In social mammals, the presence of an affiliative conspecific reduces stress responses, a phenomenon referred to as "social buffering."In a previous study, we found that the presence of a conspecific animal ameliorated a variety of stress responses to an aversive conditioned stimulus (CS), including freezing and Fos expression in the lateral amygdala (LA) of male rats. Although these findings suggest that the presence of a conspecific animal suppresses neural activity in the LA, direct neurophysiological evidence of suppressed activity in the LA during social buffering is still lacking. In the present study, we analyzed freezing behavior and local field potentials in the LA of fear-conditioned rats in response to the CS, in the presence or absence of a conspecific. After auditory aversive conditioning, the CS was presented to the conditioned rats in the presence or absence of a conspecific animal, on 2 successive days. The presence of a conspecific animal significantly decreased the mean peak amplitudes of auditory evoked field potentials, gamma oscillations (25-75 Hz) and high frequency oscillations (100-300 Hz) in the LA. Furthermore, magnitudes of these neural responses positively correlated with freezing duration of the fear-conditioned rats. The results provide the first electrophysiological evidence that social buffering suppresses CS-induced activation in the LA, which consequently reduces conditioned fear responses.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus