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Oxidative DNA damage in diabetic and mild gestational hyperglycemic pregnant women.

Gelaleti RB, Damasceno DC, Lima PH, Salvadori DM, Calderon Ide M, Peraçoli JC, Rudge MV - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2015)

Bottom Line: Maternal blood samples (5-10 mL) were collected and processed for determination of oxidative DNA damage by the comet assay, using Fpg and Endo III enzymes.On the other hand, oxidative DNA damage detected in women with mild gestational hyperglycemia might be associated with repercussions from obesity, hypertension and/or insulin resistance.Interestingly, the type of DNA base affected seemed to be dependent on the glycemic profile or oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Botucatu Medical School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, SP Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pregnant women with mild gestational hyperglycemia present high risk for hypertension, obesity and hyperglycemia, and appeared to reproduce the model of metabolic syndrome in pregnancy, with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Our clinical studies showed that mild gestational hyperglycemia or gestational diabetes are related to similar adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Hyperglycemia and other factors associated with diabetes generate reactive oxygen species that increase DNA damage levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of pregnant women with diabetes or mild gestational hyperglycemia.

Methods: The study included 111 pregnant women distributed into three groups based on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycemic profiles (GP), as follows: Normal OGTT and GP (control group); Normal OGTT and abnormal GP (mild gestational hyperglycemia group); Abnormal OGTT and GP (diabetic group). Maternal blood samples (5-10 mL) were collected and processed for determination of oxidative DNA damage by the comet assay, using Fpg and Endo III enzymes. Urine samples were also collected for determination of 8-OHdG concentrations by ELISA.

Results: Subjects in the diabetes group presented increased amount of oxidized purines, while mild gestational hyperglycemia women presented with increased oxidized pyrimidines, compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Gestational, overt diabetes and mild gestational hyperglycemia, were all related to increased oxidative DNA damage. Diabetic pregnant women showed increased level of oxidative DNA damage, perhaps mainly due to hyperglycemia. On the other hand, oxidative DNA damage detected in women with mild gestational hyperglycemia might be associated with repercussions from obesity, hypertension and/or insulin resistance. Interestingly, the type of DNA base affected seemed to be dependent on the glycemic profile or oxidative stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Oxidative DNA damage levels after treatment using enzyme formamidopirimidine glycosylase (Fpg) in the study groups. Data presented as mean ± standard error of mean. *p < 0.05 – significant difference compared to the control group (Gamma distribution).
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Fig1: Oxidative DNA damage levels after treatment using enzyme formamidopirimidine glycosylase (Fpg) in the study groups. Data presented as mean ± standard error of mean. *p < 0.05 – significant difference compared to the control group (Gamma distribution).

Mentions: Our results showed an increased level of oxidized purines (FPG) (tail intensity) in lymphocytes from women with DG, compared to women in the control group (Figure 1) and an increased level of oxidized pyrimidines (EndoIII) (tail intensity) in lymphocytes from women with MGH compared to the control group (Figure 2). Regarding the concentration of 8-OHdG in urine, it was slightly increased in pregnant women with diabetes and MGH, although no statistically significant difference was detected (p > 0.05) (Figure 3).Table 1


Oxidative DNA damage in diabetic and mild gestational hyperglycemic pregnant women.

Gelaleti RB, Damasceno DC, Lima PH, Salvadori DM, Calderon Ide M, Peraçoli JC, Rudge MV - Diabetol Metab Syndr (2015)

Oxidative DNA damage levels after treatment using enzyme formamidopirimidine glycosylase (Fpg) in the study groups. Data presented as mean ± standard error of mean. *p < 0.05 – significant difference compared to the control group (Gamma distribution).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373109&req=5

Fig1: Oxidative DNA damage levels after treatment using enzyme formamidopirimidine glycosylase (Fpg) in the study groups. Data presented as mean ± standard error of mean. *p < 0.05 – significant difference compared to the control group (Gamma distribution).
Mentions: Our results showed an increased level of oxidized purines (FPG) (tail intensity) in lymphocytes from women with DG, compared to women in the control group (Figure 1) and an increased level of oxidized pyrimidines (EndoIII) (tail intensity) in lymphocytes from women with MGH compared to the control group (Figure 2). Regarding the concentration of 8-OHdG in urine, it was slightly increased in pregnant women with diabetes and MGH, although no statistically significant difference was detected (p > 0.05) (Figure 3).Table 1

Bottom Line: Maternal blood samples (5-10 mL) were collected and processed for determination of oxidative DNA damage by the comet assay, using Fpg and Endo III enzymes.On the other hand, oxidative DNA damage detected in women with mild gestational hyperglycemia might be associated with repercussions from obesity, hypertension and/or insulin resistance.Interestingly, the type of DNA base affected seemed to be dependent on the glycemic profile or oxidative stress.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Botucatu Medical School, UNESP - Univ Estadual Paulista, São Paulo, SP Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pregnant women with mild gestational hyperglycemia present high risk for hypertension, obesity and hyperglycemia, and appeared to reproduce the model of metabolic syndrome in pregnancy, with hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance. Our clinical studies showed that mild gestational hyperglycemia or gestational diabetes are related to similar adverse maternal and perinatal outcomes. Hyperglycemia and other factors associated with diabetes generate reactive oxygen species that increase DNA damage levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative DNA damage in lymphocytes of pregnant women with diabetes or mild gestational hyperglycemia.

Methods: The study included 111 pregnant women distributed into three groups based on oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and glycemic profiles (GP), as follows: Normal OGTT and GP (control group); Normal OGTT and abnormal GP (mild gestational hyperglycemia group); Abnormal OGTT and GP (diabetic group). Maternal blood samples (5-10 mL) were collected and processed for determination of oxidative DNA damage by the comet assay, using Fpg and Endo III enzymes. Urine samples were also collected for determination of 8-OHdG concentrations by ELISA.

Results: Subjects in the diabetes group presented increased amount of oxidized purines, while mild gestational hyperglycemia women presented with increased oxidized pyrimidines, compared to the control group.

Conclusion: Gestational, overt diabetes and mild gestational hyperglycemia, were all related to increased oxidative DNA damage. Diabetic pregnant women showed increased level of oxidative DNA damage, perhaps mainly due to hyperglycemia. On the other hand, oxidative DNA damage detected in women with mild gestational hyperglycemia might be associated with repercussions from obesity, hypertension and/or insulin resistance. Interestingly, the type of DNA base affected seemed to be dependent on the glycemic profile or oxidative stress.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus