Limits...
Detection of morphologic alterations in rectal carcinoma following preoperative radiochemotherapy based on multiphoton microscopy imaging.

Li L, Chen Z, Wang X, Li H, Jiang W, Zhuo S, Guan G, Chen J - BMC Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: Preoperative radiochemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma, and has been used increasingly in patient management.In this study, we used multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect morphologic alterations in rectal adenocarcinomas in patients treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy.MPM was able to identify histopathologic alterations in rectal cancer following preoperative radiochemotherapy, and allowed the qualitative assessment of treatment efficacy and feasibility in relation to dose or strategy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007, China. lhli@fjnu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preoperative radiochemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma, and has been used increasingly in patient management. However, there is a strong clinical need to assess tumor response to neoadjuvant treatment, and a non-invasive technique that allows the precise identification of morphologic changes in tumors would be of considerable clinical interest.

Methods: In this study, we used multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect morphologic alterations in rectal adenocarcinomas in patients treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy.

Results: MPM was able to identify histopathologic alterations in rectal cancer following preoperative radiochemotherapy, and allowed the qualitative assessment of treatment efficacy and feasibility in relation to dose or strategy.

Conclusion: These findings may provide the groundwork for evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant treatment, thus allowing the tailoring of effective treatment doses and strategies.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Collagen density in stromal fibrosis, normal submucosa, and serosa. Error bars indicate SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373096&req=5

Fig5: Collagen density in stromal fibrosis, normal submucosa, and serosa. Error bars indicate SD.

Mentions: The collagen density in stromal fibrosis (0.97 ± 0.03) was significantly higher compared with normal submucosa (0.77 ± 0.06) and serosa (0.71 ± 0.05) (Figure 5) (P < 0.0001 between the submucosa, serosa, and fibrosis: one-way ANOVA test; SPSS 15.0). The vessel wall thickness was 117.23 ± 36.46 μm, and the relatively large SD indicates considerable variation in blood vessel size. The nuclear area was 83.28 ± 57.02 μm2, and again the large SD demonstrates that carcinomatous cells in post-treatment rectal carcinoma displayed marked nuclear atypia. A combination of collagen density, vessel wall thickness, and nuclear area may thus be useful for quantitatively monitoring the development of rectal carcinomas in patients undergoing preoperative radiochemotherapy.Figure 5


Detection of morphologic alterations in rectal carcinoma following preoperative radiochemotherapy based on multiphoton microscopy imaging.

Li L, Chen Z, Wang X, Li H, Jiang W, Zhuo S, Guan G, Chen J - BMC Cancer (2015)

Collagen density in stromal fibrosis, normal submucosa, and serosa. Error bars indicate SD.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4373096&req=5

Fig5: Collagen density in stromal fibrosis, normal submucosa, and serosa. Error bars indicate SD.
Mentions: The collagen density in stromal fibrosis (0.97 ± 0.03) was significantly higher compared with normal submucosa (0.77 ± 0.06) and serosa (0.71 ± 0.05) (Figure 5) (P < 0.0001 between the submucosa, serosa, and fibrosis: one-way ANOVA test; SPSS 15.0). The vessel wall thickness was 117.23 ± 36.46 μm, and the relatively large SD indicates considerable variation in blood vessel size. The nuclear area was 83.28 ± 57.02 μm2, and again the large SD demonstrates that carcinomatous cells in post-treatment rectal carcinoma displayed marked nuclear atypia. A combination of collagen density, vessel wall thickness, and nuclear area may thus be useful for quantitatively monitoring the development of rectal carcinomas in patients undergoing preoperative radiochemotherapy.Figure 5

Bottom Line: Preoperative radiochemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma, and has been used increasingly in patient management.In this study, we used multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect morphologic alterations in rectal adenocarcinomas in patients treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy.MPM was able to identify histopathologic alterations in rectal cancer following preoperative radiochemotherapy, and allowed the qualitative assessment of treatment efficacy and feasibility in relation to dose or strategy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Laser and Optoelectronics Technology, Fujian Provincial Key Laboratory for Photonics Technology, Key Laboratory of OptoElectronic Science and Technology for Medicine of Ministry of Education, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou, 350007, China. lhli@fjnu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Preoperative radiochemotherapy improves outcomes in patients with locally advanced rectal carcinoma, and has been used increasingly in patient management. However, there is a strong clinical need to assess tumor response to neoadjuvant treatment, and a non-invasive technique that allows the precise identification of morphologic changes in tumors would be of considerable clinical interest.

Methods: In this study, we used multiphoton microscopy (MPM) to detect morphologic alterations in rectal adenocarcinomas in patients treated with preoperative radiochemotherapy.

Results: MPM was able to identify histopathologic alterations in rectal cancer following preoperative radiochemotherapy, and allowed the qualitative assessment of treatment efficacy and feasibility in relation to dose or strategy.

Conclusion: These findings may provide the groundwork for evaluating tumor response to neoadjuvant treatment, thus allowing the tailoring of effective treatment doses and strategies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus