Limits...
Neonatal pustular dermatosis: an overview.

Ghosh S - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Mar-Apr)

Bottom Line: Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis.Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections.This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Skin and VD, PGIMS, Rohtak, Haryana, India.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A neonate with numerous discrete tiny pustules with hyperpigmented background, distributed over forehead, limbs, and trunk
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372928&req=5

Figure 2: A neonate with numerous discrete tiny pustules with hyperpigmented background, distributed over forehead, limbs, and trunk

Mentions: Transient neonatal pustular melanosis (TNPM) is an idiopathic pustular eruption that heals with brown pigmented macules. TNPM is more common in black neonates, and is probably the reason for the so-called lentigines neonatorum noted in 15% of black newborns.[5] The lesions are almost invariably present at birth with 1–3 mm, flaccid, superficial, fragile pustules with no surrounding erythema. Usually distributed over chin, neck, forehead, back, and buttocks, even palms and soles may be involved. Eventually the pustules rupture and form brown crust and finally a small collarette of scales. Sometimes pigmented macules are already present at birth. The pigmentation may persist for about 3 months but the affected neonates are otherwise entirely normal.[67] It has been suggested that it is merely a variant of ETN and their description has been separated for the sake of clarity[6] [Figure 2].


Neonatal pustular dermatosis: an overview.

Ghosh S - Indian J Dermatol (2015 Mar-Apr)

A neonate with numerous discrete tiny pustules with hyperpigmented background, distributed over forehead, limbs, and trunk
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372928&req=5

Figure 2: A neonate with numerous discrete tiny pustules with hyperpigmented background, distributed over forehead, limbs, and trunk
Mentions: Transient neonatal pustular melanosis (TNPM) is an idiopathic pustular eruption that heals with brown pigmented macules. TNPM is more common in black neonates, and is probably the reason for the so-called lentigines neonatorum noted in 15% of black newborns.[5] The lesions are almost invariably present at birth with 1–3 mm, flaccid, superficial, fragile pustules with no surrounding erythema. Usually distributed over chin, neck, forehead, back, and buttocks, even palms and soles may be involved. Eventually the pustules rupture and form brown crust and finally a small collarette of scales. Sometimes pigmented macules are already present at birth. The pigmentation may persist for about 3 months but the affected neonates are otherwise entirely normal.[67] It has been suggested that it is merely a variant of ETN and their description has been separated for the sake of clarity[6] [Figure 2].

Bottom Line: Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis.Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections.This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Skin and VD, PGIMS, Rohtak, Haryana, India.

ABSTRACT
Neonatal pustular eruption is a group of disorders characterized by various forms of pustulosis seen in first 4 weeks of life. Its presentation is often similar with some subtle differences, which can be further established by few simple laboratory aids, to arrive at a definite diagnosis. Given their ubiquitous presentation, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate among self-limiting, noninfectious, pustular dermatosis such as erythema toxicum neonatorum, transient neonatal pustular melanosis, miliaria pustulosa, etc., and potentially life threatening infections such as herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus infections. This review article tries to address the chronological, clinical, morphological, and histological differences among the various pustular eruptions in a newborn, in order to make it easier for a practicing dermatologist to diagnose and treat these similar looking but different entities of pustulation with a clear demarcation between the physiological benign pustular rashes and the infectious pustular lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus