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The Technology of the Gibbet.

Tarlow S - Int J Hist Archaeol (2014)

Bottom Line: The practice was not abolished until 1834.This article considers the technical and design features of the gibbet cage, through an exhaustive survey and catalogue of their surviving remains.The technology of the gibbet shows how state directives intersected with geographical discretion in the creation of idiosyncratic local solutions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT

The practice of "hanging in chains" or gibbeting had been part of the punitive repertoire of the English and Welsh judicial system for centuries before the 1751-52 Murder Act specified it as one of two mandatory post-mortem punishments for murderers. The practice was not abolished until 1834. This article considers the technical and design features of the gibbet cage, through an exhaustive survey and catalogue of their surviving remains. It notes that, given the comparative rarity of hanging in chains, no chronological or regional traditions of design are evident in this kind of artifact, since blacksmiths were individually solving the problem of fulfilling the necessary functions of a gibbet cage without knowledge of previous examples and under great time pressure. The technology of the gibbet shows how state directives intersected with geographical discretion in the creation of idiosyncratic local solutions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tom Otter’s gibbet headpiece
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Fig11: Tom Otter’s gibbet headpiece

Mentions: Thomas Temporell, known locally as Tom Otter, was hung in chains for the murder of his wife, at Drinsey Nook, near Doddington, Lincolnshire. Only the headpiece and one leg brace now survive and they are in the private collection at Doddington Hall. When Tom Otter’s gibbet was blown down in 1850, 46 years after he was first hung up, the gypsies acted quickly and were able to take nearly all the irons, except for the head piece which was kept by Edwin Jarvis of Doddington Hall who recorded the event in a commonplace book still kept at the hall in the possession of his descendant Claire Birch. The headpiece consists of a very solid and substantial iron piece with three arms bent into a head shape and bolted to a heavy hinged collar (Fig. 11). The top is reinforced with a bolted-on plate and has a central hole through which passes the hook.Fig. 11


The Technology of the Gibbet.

Tarlow S - Int J Hist Archaeol (2014)

Tom Otter’s gibbet headpiece
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372825&req=5

Fig11: Tom Otter’s gibbet headpiece
Mentions: Thomas Temporell, known locally as Tom Otter, was hung in chains for the murder of his wife, at Drinsey Nook, near Doddington, Lincolnshire. Only the headpiece and one leg brace now survive and they are in the private collection at Doddington Hall. When Tom Otter’s gibbet was blown down in 1850, 46 years after he was first hung up, the gypsies acted quickly and were able to take nearly all the irons, except for the head piece which was kept by Edwin Jarvis of Doddington Hall who recorded the event in a commonplace book still kept at the hall in the possession of his descendant Claire Birch. The headpiece consists of a very solid and substantial iron piece with three arms bent into a head shape and bolted to a heavy hinged collar (Fig. 11). The top is reinforced with a bolted-on plate and has a central hole through which passes the hook.Fig. 11

Bottom Line: The practice was not abolished until 1834.This article considers the technical and design features of the gibbet cage, through an exhaustive survey and catalogue of their surviving remains.The technology of the gibbet shows how state directives intersected with geographical discretion in the creation of idiosyncratic local solutions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Archaeology and Ancient History, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK.

ABSTRACT

The practice of "hanging in chains" or gibbeting had been part of the punitive repertoire of the English and Welsh judicial system for centuries before the 1751-52 Murder Act specified it as one of two mandatory post-mortem punishments for murderers. The practice was not abolished until 1834. This article considers the technical and design features of the gibbet cage, through an exhaustive survey and catalogue of their surviving remains. It notes that, given the comparative rarity of hanging in chains, no chronological or regional traditions of design are evident in this kind of artifact, since blacksmiths were individually solving the problem of fulfilling the necessary functions of a gibbet cage without knowledge of previous examples and under great time pressure. The technology of the gibbet shows how state directives intersected with geographical discretion in the creation of idiosyncratic local solutions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus