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Thermoelectric fabrics: toward power generating clothing.

Du Y, Cai K, Chen S, Wang H, Shen SZ, Donelson R, Lin T - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K.The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K.Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Herein, we demonstrate that a flexible, air-permeable, thermoelectric (TE) power generator can be prepared by applying a TE polymer (e.g. poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)) coated commercial fabric and subsequently by linking the coated strips with a conductive connection (e.g. using fine metal wires). The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K. The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K. The potential for using fabric TE devices to harvest body temperature energy has been discussed. Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics.

No MeSH data available.


(a)–(c) Dependencies of (a) electrical conductivity, (b) Seebeck coefficient, and (c) power factor of PEODT:PSS coated fabric on temperature. (d) Surface temperature profile along the black arrow in panel (e). The inset in panel (d) is the digital photo of experimental setup for measuring the temperature profile of PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. (e) Infrared thermal image of the PEODT:PSS coated fabric at the area marked by the white square in the inset in panel (d).
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f2: (a)–(c) Dependencies of (a) electrical conductivity, (b) Seebeck coefficient, and (c) power factor of PEODT:PSS coated fabric on temperature. (d) Surface temperature profile along the black arrow in panel (e). The inset in panel (d) is the digital photo of experimental setup for measuring the temperature profile of PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. (e) Infrared thermal image of the PEODT:PSS coated fabric at the area marked by the white square in the inset in panel (d).

Mentions: Figures 2a - c show the temperature dependency of electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and power factor of the PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. Normally, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the as-prepared PEDOT:PSS coated polyester fabrics is in the range of ~0.5–3 S/cm and 15.3–16.3 μV/K at ~300 K, respectively. One of the as-prepared coated fabrics was randomly chosen and cut into a small piece (length × width, ~22.0 mm × 3.7 mm). This sample was then measured 5 times in the temperature range of ~300 K to 390 K. Good repeatability in the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient was obtained. The electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS coated fabric remained almost constant at ~1.4 S/cm (the minimum value for the 5 times measurements) to 1.5 S/cm (the maximum value for the 5 times measurements) (Fig. 2a), while the Seebeck coefficient increased slowly from 15.8 μV/K (the minimum value for the 5 times measurements) to 18.5 μV/K (the maximum value for the 5 times measurements) when temperature changed from ~300 K to 390 K (Fig. 2b). This indicates that the coated fabric is a p-type semiconductor. It should be noted that the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the uncoated polyester fabric could not be measured due to its insulating nature.


Thermoelectric fabrics: toward power generating clothing.

Du Y, Cai K, Chen S, Wang H, Shen SZ, Donelson R, Lin T - Sci Rep (2015)

(a)–(c) Dependencies of (a) electrical conductivity, (b) Seebeck coefficient, and (c) power factor of PEODT:PSS coated fabric on temperature. (d) Surface temperature profile along the black arrow in panel (e). The inset in panel (d) is the digital photo of experimental setup for measuring the temperature profile of PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. (e) Infrared thermal image of the PEODT:PSS coated fabric at the area marked by the white square in the inset in panel (d).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372730&req=5

f2: (a)–(c) Dependencies of (a) electrical conductivity, (b) Seebeck coefficient, and (c) power factor of PEODT:PSS coated fabric on temperature. (d) Surface temperature profile along the black arrow in panel (e). The inset in panel (d) is the digital photo of experimental setup for measuring the temperature profile of PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. (e) Infrared thermal image of the PEODT:PSS coated fabric at the area marked by the white square in the inset in panel (d).
Mentions: Figures 2a - c show the temperature dependency of electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and power factor of the PEDOT:PSS coated fabric. Normally, the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the as-prepared PEDOT:PSS coated polyester fabrics is in the range of ~0.5–3 S/cm and 15.3–16.3 μV/K at ~300 K, respectively. One of the as-prepared coated fabrics was randomly chosen and cut into a small piece (length × width, ~22.0 mm × 3.7 mm). This sample was then measured 5 times in the temperature range of ~300 K to 390 K. Good repeatability in the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient was obtained. The electrical conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS coated fabric remained almost constant at ~1.4 S/cm (the minimum value for the 5 times measurements) to 1.5 S/cm (the maximum value for the 5 times measurements) (Fig. 2a), while the Seebeck coefficient increased slowly from 15.8 μV/K (the minimum value for the 5 times measurements) to 18.5 μV/K (the maximum value for the 5 times measurements) when temperature changed from ~300 K to 390 K (Fig. 2b). This indicates that the coated fabric is a p-type semiconductor. It should be noted that the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient of the uncoated polyester fabric could not be measured due to its insulating nature.

Bottom Line: The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K.The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K.Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3216, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Herein, we demonstrate that a flexible, air-permeable, thermoelectric (TE) power generator can be prepared by applying a TE polymer (e.g. poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate)) coated commercial fabric and subsequently by linking the coated strips with a conductive connection (e.g. using fine metal wires). The poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(4-styrenesulfonate) coated fabric shows very stable TE properties from 300 K to 390 K. The fabric device can generate a TE voltage output (V) of 4.3 mV at a temperature difference (ΔT) of 75.2 K. The potential for using fabric TE devices to harvest body temperature energy has been discussed. Fabric-based TE devices may be useful for the development of new power generating clothing and self-powered wearable electronics.

No MeSH data available.