Limits...
Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental setup of the combined confocal, two-photon, and optical-resolution microscope, and example images.A. Two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical sources into a common optical path in a commercial microscope. The generated PA signals are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope. Then dichroic mirrors split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams; one is sent to the confocal detector, and the other is sent to the MPM signal detector. B. MPM image of leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts. C. Confocal image of FL signals from chloroplasts. D. OR-PAM MAP image of moss leaves at 570 nm. E. OR-PAM MAP image of the moss leaves at 578 nm. F. Merged image rendered from MPM, confocal, and 570 nm OR-PAM image as green, red, and blue color respectively. G. Differential absorption contrast image of OR-PAM MAP image. PMT, photomultiplier tube; DM, dichroic mirror; BS, beam splitter; PBS, polarization beam splitter; HWP, half-wave plate; PA, photoacoustic; MPM, multi-photon microscopy; FL, fluorescence; OR-PAM, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy; MAP, maximum amplitude projection. Reprinted from Rao et al. J Biomed Opt 2014;19:36002 [25], with permission of SPIE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372714&req=5

f5-usg-14062: Experimental setup of the combined confocal, two-photon, and optical-resolution microscope, and example images.A. Two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical sources into a common optical path in a commercial microscope. The generated PA signals are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope. Then dichroic mirrors split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams; one is sent to the confocal detector, and the other is sent to the MPM signal detector. B. MPM image of leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts. C. Confocal image of FL signals from chloroplasts. D. OR-PAM MAP image of moss leaves at 570 nm. E. OR-PAM MAP image of the moss leaves at 578 nm. F. Merged image rendered from MPM, confocal, and 570 nm OR-PAM image as green, red, and blue color respectively. G. Differential absorption contrast image of OR-PAM MAP image. PMT, photomultiplier tube; DM, dichroic mirror; BS, beam splitter; PBS, polarization beam splitter; HWP, half-wave plate; PA, photoacoustic; MPM, multi-photon microscopy; FL, fluorescence; OR-PAM, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy; MAP, maximum amplitude projection. Reprinted from Rao et al. J Biomed Opt 2014;19:36002 [25], with permission of SPIE.

Mentions: Recently, a new integrated system has been developed, combining PAM, confocal microscopy, and MPM [25]. This means that MPM can be extended to new biological investigations by measuring nonfluorescent substances such as hemoglobin and melanin. In the combined system (Fig. 5A), two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical source of each technology into an optical common path in a commercial microscope. The PA signals generated by the sample are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope body. Dichroic mirrors then split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams. One is sent to the confocal detector and one is sent to the MPM signal detector. Images of moss leaves were acquired: the MPM image visualized leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts inside the leaf cells (Fig. 5B), a confocal image was obtained based on FL signals from the chloroplasts (Fig. 5C), and the optical resolution PAM maximum amplitude projection images visualized the moss leaves at optical wavelengths of 570 nm (Fig. 5D) and 578 nm (Fig. 5E). The maximum amplitude images of the MPM, confocal microscopy, and 570-nm optical-resolution PAM systems were merged into one overlay as green, red, and blue, respectively (Fig. 5F), and a differential absorption contrast image was generated in order to visualize the change in optical absorption across multiple wavelengths (Fig. 5G). The differential absorption contrast images can provide functional information about nonfluorescent chromophores.


Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Experimental setup of the combined confocal, two-photon, and optical-resolution microscope, and example images.A. Two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical sources into a common optical path in a commercial microscope. The generated PA signals are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope. Then dichroic mirrors split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams; one is sent to the confocal detector, and the other is sent to the MPM signal detector. B. MPM image of leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts. C. Confocal image of FL signals from chloroplasts. D. OR-PAM MAP image of moss leaves at 570 nm. E. OR-PAM MAP image of the moss leaves at 578 nm. F. Merged image rendered from MPM, confocal, and 570 nm OR-PAM image as green, red, and blue color respectively. G. Differential absorption contrast image of OR-PAM MAP image. PMT, photomultiplier tube; DM, dichroic mirror; BS, beam splitter; PBS, polarization beam splitter; HWP, half-wave plate; PA, photoacoustic; MPM, multi-photon microscopy; FL, fluorescence; OR-PAM, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy; MAP, maximum amplitude projection. Reprinted from Rao et al. J Biomed Opt 2014;19:36002 [25], with permission of SPIE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372714&req=5

f5-usg-14062: Experimental setup of the combined confocal, two-photon, and optical-resolution microscope, and example images.A. Two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical sources into a common optical path in a commercial microscope. The generated PA signals are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope. Then dichroic mirrors split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams; one is sent to the confocal detector, and the other is sent to the MPM signal detector. B. MPM image of leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts. C. Confocal image of FL signals from chloroplasts. D. OR-PAM MAP image of moss leaves at 570 nm. E. OR-PAM MAP image of the moss leaves at 578 nm. F. Merged image rendered from MPM, confocal, and 570 nm OR-PAM image as green, red, and blue color respectively. G. Differential absorption contrast image of OR-PAM MAP image. PMT, photomultiplier tube; DM, dichroic mirror; BS, beam splitter; PBS, polarization beam splitter; HWP, half-wave plate; PA, photoacoustic; MPM, multi-photon microscopy; FL, fluorescence; OR-PAM, optical-resolution photoacoustic microscopy; MAP, maximum amplitude projection. Reprinted from Rao et al. J Biomed Opt 2014;19:36002 [25], with permission of SPIE.
Mentions: Recently, a new integrated system has been developed, combining PAM, confocal microscopy, and MPM [25]. This means that MPM can be extended to new biological investigations by measuring nonfluorescent substances such as hemoglobin and melanin. In the combined system (Fig. 5A), two polarization beam splitters and a half-wave plate combine the optical source of each technology into an optical common path in a commercial microscope. The PA signals generated by the sample are detected by an acoustic transducer in the microscope body. Dichroic mirrors then split the backwardpropagating fluorescent light into two beams. One is sent to the confocal detector and one is sent to the MPM signal detector. Images of moss leaves were acquired: the MPM image visualized leaf cell boundaries and chloroplasts inside the leaf cells (Fig. 5B), a confocal image was obtained based on FL signals from the chloroplasts (Fig. 5C), and the optical resolution PAM maximum amplitude projection images visualized the moss leaves at optical wavelengths of 570 nm (Fig. 5D) and 578 nm (Fig. 5E). The maximum amplitude images of the MPM, confocal microscopy, and 570-nm optical-resolution PAM systems were merged into one overlay as green, red, and blue, respectively (Fig. 5F), and a differential absorption contrast image was generated in order to visualize the change in optical absorption across multiple wavelengths (Fig. 5G). The differential absorption contrast images can provide functional information about nonfluorescent chromophores.

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.