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Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental setup of PA and FL imaging systems, and example image of each modality.A. The wavelength of pumped laser is tuned by OPO laser and guided to CNL. CNL and CCL produce a ring-shaped beam and the OC merges the diverged beam to the target object. The UT detects the generated PA waves and the DAQ saves the detected signal. B. A filtered source laser excites the target tissue and the CCD camera detects the emitted FL signal. The FL signal is filtered by an emission filter. C. In vivo noninvasive PA images of an ICG injected bladder in a rat. Pseudo-color represents depth information (red=deep to blue=shallow). The PA signal from ICG in the bladder and catheter is clearly visible in (C). D. In vivo noninvasive PA images of ICG injected in the bladder of a rat. The grayscale picture is acquired under room light, and the green color represents the FL signal of the ICG. The background picture and FL image are acquired separately and overlaid in post-processing. Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; OPO, optical parametric oscillator; CNL, conical lens; CCL, concave lens; AMP, amplifier; OSC, oscilloscope; DAQ, data acquisition system; OC, optical condenser; UT, ultrasound transducer; WT, water tank; UG, ultrasound gel; PC, personal computer; BD, bladder; ICG, indocyanine green; PA, photoacoustic; FL, fluorescence. Reprinted from Park et al. Sensors (Basel) 2014;14:19660-19668 [33], according to the Creative Commons License MDPI.
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f3-usg-14062: Experimental setup of PA and FL imaging systems, and example image of each modality.A. The wavelength of pumped laser is tuned by OPO laser and guided to CNL. CNL and CCL produce a ring-shaped beam and the OC merges the diverged beam to the target object. The UT detects the generated PA waves and the DAQ saves the detected signal. B. A filtered source laser excites the target tissue and the CCD camera detects the emitted FL signal. The FL signal is filtered by an emission filter. C. In vivo noninvasive PA images of an ICG injected bladder in a rat. Pseudo-color represents depth information (red=deep to blue=shallow). The PA signal from ICG in the bladder and catheter is clearly visible in (C). D. In vivo noninvasive PA images of ICG injected in the bladder of a rat. The grayscale picture is acquired under room light, and the green color represents the FL signal of the ICG. The background picture and FL image are acquired separately and overlaid in post-processing. Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; OPO, optical parametric oscillator; CNL, conical lens; CCL, concave lens; AMP, amplifier; OSC, oscilloscope; DAQ, data acquisition system; OC, optical condenser; UT, ultrasound transducer; WT, water tank; UG, ultrasound gel; PC, personal computer; BD, bladder; ICG, indocyanine green; PA, photoacoustic; FL, fluorescence. Reprinted from Park et al. Sensors (Basel) 2014;14:19660-19668 [33], according to the Creative Commons License MDPI.

Mentions: Indocyanine green has been used in combined PA and FL imaging [33,34]. In vivo PA and FL images of the bladder in rats were acquired after injecting indocyanine green [33]. The images were taken by separate PA and FL imaging systems (Fig. 3A, B). In the PA imaging system, pulsed laser beams with a pulse duration of 5 nanoseconds were generated by a 10-Hz Q-switched neodymiumdoped yttrium aluminum garnet pump laser. The generated laser beams were tuned using an optical parametric oscillator system. The wavelength of the output laser can be tuned from 680 to 2,500 nm. The wavelength-tuned laser was delivered to a conical lens to make a donut-shaped beam pattern. A single-element focused US transducer was then placed in the center of the ring-shape beam. The diverged beam was refocused on the target object with an optical condenser. A bottom-open water tank and US gel were used to match acoustic impedance between the rat and the US transducer. The bottom of the water tank was sealed using a transparent membrane. The PA waves were detected by a US transducer, amplified, and saved by a data acquisition system. Mechanical raster scanning was used to acquire volumetric data. The PA image was constructed by postprocessing the saved data. In the FL imaging system, a continuouswave laser source was used. The output laser was filtered by an excitation filter, and then beamed directly at the target. The emitted FL signals were filtered by an emission filter and focused on a charge-coupled device camera, which detected the FL signals and constructed the FL image. Using this combination of PA and FL, in vivo bladder FL and PA images of the rat were acquired (Fig. 3C, D). Indocyanine green was injected through a 22-gauge lubricantcoated catheter. In general, the bladder itself does not have optical absorption, and is therefore invisible in a PA image. After injecting indocyanine green, the resulting PA image clearly showed the shape of bladder, as well as surrounding blood vessels (Fig. 3C). The FL image did not provide structural information about the bladder but could verify that it took up indocyanine green (Fig. 3D).


Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Experimental setup of PA and FL imaging systems, and example image of each modality.A. The wavelength of pumped laser is tuned by OPO laser and guided to CNL. CNL and CCL produce a ring-shaped beam and the OC merges the diverged beam to the target object. The UT detects the generated PA waves and the DAQ saves the detected signal. B. A filtered source laser excites the target tissue and the CCD camera detects the emitted FL signal. The FL signal is filtered by an emission filter. C. In vivo noninvasive PA images of an ICG injected bladder in a rat. Pseudo-color represents depth information (red=deep to blue=shallow). The PA signal from ICG in the bladder and catheter is clearly visible in (C). D. In vivo noninvasive PA images of ICG injected in the bladder of a rat. The grayscale picture is acquired under room light, and the green color represents the FL signal of the ICG. The background picture and FL image are acquired separately and overlaid in post-processing. Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; OPO, optical parametric oscillator; CNL, conical lens; CCL, concave lens; AMP, amplifier; OSC, oscilloscope; DAQ, data acquisition system; OC, optical condenser; UT, ultrasound transducer; WT, water tank; UG, ultrasound gel; PC, personal computer; BD, bladder; ICG, indocyanine green; PA, photoacoustic; FL, fluorescence. Reprinted from Park et al. Sensors (Basel) 2014;14:19660-19668 [33], according to the Creative Commons License MDPI.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
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f3-usg-14062: Experimental setup of PA and FL imaging systems, and example image of each modality.A. The wavelength of pumped laser is tuned by OPO laser and guided to CNL. CNL and CCL produce a ring-shaped beam and the OC merges the diverged beam to the target object. The UT detects the generated PA waves and the DAQ saves the detected signal. B. A filtered source laser excites the target tissue and the CCD camera detects the emitted FL signal. The FL signal is filtered by an emission filter. C. In vivo noninvasive PA images of an ICG injected bladder in a rat. Pseudo-color represents depth information (red=deep to blue=shallow). The PA signal from ICG in the bladder and catheter is clearly visible in (C). D. In vivo noninvasive PA images of ICG injected in the bladder of a rat. The grayscale picture is acquired under room light, and the green color represents the FL signal of the ICG. The background picture and FL image are acquired separately and overlaid in post-processing. Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; OPO, optical parametric oscillator; CNL, conical lens; CCL, concave lens; AMP, amplifier; OSC, oscilloscope; DAQ, data acquisition system; OC, optical condenser; UT, ultrasound transducer; WT, water tank; UG, ultrasound gel; PC, personal computer; BD, bladder; ICG, indocyanine green; PA, photoacoustic; FL, fluorescence. Reprinted from Park et al. Sensors (Basel) 2014;14:19660-19668 [33], according to the Creative Commons License MDPI.
Mentions: Indocyanine green has been used in combined PA and FL imaging [33,34]. In vivo PA and FL images of the bladder in rats were acquired after injecting indocyanine green [33]. The images were taken by separate PA and FL imaging systems (Fig. 3A, B). In the PA imaging system, pulsed laser beams with a pulse duration of 5 nanoseconds were generated by a 10-Hz Q-switched neodymiumdoped yttrium aluminum garnet pump laser. The generated laser beams were tuned using an optical parametric oscillator system. The wavelength of the output laser can be tuned from 680 to 2,500 nm. The wavelength-tuned laser was delivered to a conical lens to make a donut-shaped beam pattern. A single-element focused US transducer was then placed in the center of the ring-shape beam. The diverged beam was refocused on the target object with an optical condenser. A bottom-open water tank and US gel were used to match acoustic impedance between the rat and the US transducer. The bottom of the water tank was sealed using a transparent membrane. The PA waves were detected by a US transducer, amplified, and saved by a data acquisition system. Mechanical raster scanning was used to acquire volumetric data. The PA image was constructed by postprocessing the saved data. In the FL imaging system, a continuouswave laser source was used. The output laser was filtered by an excitation filter, and then beamed directly at the target. The emitted FL signals were filtered by an emission filter and focused on a charge-coupled device camera, which detected the FL signals and constructed the FL image. Using this combination of PA and FL, in vivo bladder FL and PA images of the rat were acquired (Fig. 3C, D). Indocyanine green was injected through a 22-gauge lubricantcoated catheter. In general, the bladder itself does not have optical absorption, and is therefore invisible in a PA image. After injecting indocyanine green, the resulting PA image clearly showed the shape of bladder, as well as surrounding blood vessels (Fig. 3C). The FL image did not provide structural information about the bladder but could verify that it took up indocyanine green (Fig. 3D).

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.