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Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.


Experimental setup of PA/US imaging system and example image.A. Schematic of integrated PA/US imaging system. The wavelength of the pumped laser is tuned by a dye laser and coupled with a fiber bundle. The fiber bundle is integrated with a US probe and excites target tissues. The generated PA waves are detected by US probe and saved by data acquisition system. B. The PA/US image of the SLN of the rat in vivo. Grayscale represents the sonogram and pseudo-color represents the PA image. PA signals from the SLN and BVs are indicated in (B). Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; PA, photoacoustic; US, ultrasound; SLN, sentinel lymph node; BV, blood vessel. Reprinted from Erpelding et al. Radiology 2010;256:102-110 [10], with permission of Radiological Society of North America; reprinted from Kim et al. Biomed Opt Express 2010;1:278-284 [11], with permission of The Optical Society.
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f2-usg-14062: Experimental setup of PA/US imaging system and example image.A. Schematic of integrated PA/US imaging system. The wavelength of the pumped laser is tuned by a dye laser and coupled with a fiber bundle. The fiber bundle is integrated with a US probe and excites target tissues. The generated PA waves are detected by US probe and saved by data acquisition system. B. The PA/US image of the SLN of the rat in vivo. Grayscale represents the sonogram and pseudo-color represents the PA image. PA signals from the SLN and BVs are indicated in (B). Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; PA, photoacoustic; US, ultrasound; SLN, sentinel lymph node; BV, blood vessel. Reprinted from Erpelding et al. Radiology 2010;256:102-110 [10], with permission of Radiological Society of North America; reprinted from Kim et al. Biomed Opt Express 2010;1:278-284 [11], with permission of The Optical Society.

Mentions: Due to its intrinsic properties, PA imaging can be easily integrated with clinical US machines [10-13,26-29]. In order to acquire a PA image, the radio frequency signal sequences of a clinical US machine must be modified. In US imaging, a transducer transmits US waves and receives the reflected US echoes. However, in PA imaging, the laser irradiation induces acoustic waves in the medium, so the US transducer only needs to receive the generated PA waves, instead of transmitting US waves. Therefore, the transmitting function of a clinical US system must be blocked in order to acquire a PA image. Furthermore, the beamforming algorithm must be modified to enable one-way detection. In order to modify the beamforming algorithm, the raw data of the received PA signal must be accessible. Thus, a US system can be modified to provide PA/US imaging ability by simply adding a pulsed laser source (Fig. 2A) [10].


Photoacoustic imaging platforms for multimodal imaging.

Kim J, Lee D, Jung U, Kim C - Ultrasonography (2015)

Experimental setup of PA/US imaging system and example image.A. Schematic of integrated PA/US imaging system. The wavelength of the pumped laser is tuned by a dye laser and coupled with a fiber bundle. The fiber bundle is integrated with a US probe and excites target tissues. The generated PA waves are detected by US probe and saved by data acquisition system. B. The PA/US image of the SLN of the rat in vivo. Grayscale represents the sonogram and pseudo-color represents the PA image. PA signals from the SLN and BVs are indicated in (B). Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; PA, photoacoustic; US, ultrasound; SLN, sentinel lymph node; BV, blood vessel. Reprinted from Erpelding et al. Radiology 2010;256:102-110 [10], with permission of Radiological Society of North America; reprinted from Kim et al. Biomed Opt Express 2010;1:278-284 [11], with permission of The Optical Society.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
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f2-usg-14062: Experimental setup of PA/US imaging system and example image.A. Schematic of integrated PA/US imaging system. The wavelength of the pumped laser is tuned by a dye laser and coupled with a fiber bundle. The fiber bundle is integrated with a US probe and excites target tissues. The generated PA waves are detected by US probe and saved by data acquisition system. B. The PA/US image of the SLN of the rat in vivo. Grayscale represents the sonogram and pseudo-color represents the PA image. PA signals from the SLN and BVs are indicated in (B). Nd:YAG, neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet; PA, photoacoustic; US, ultrasound; SLN, sentinel lymph node; BV, blood vessel. Reprinted from Erpelding et al. Radiology 2010;256:102-110 [10], with permission of Radiological Society of North America; reprinted from Kim et al. Biomed Opt Express 2010;1:278-284 [11], with permission of The Optical Society.
Mentions: Due to its intrinsic properties, PA imaging can be easily integrated with clinical US machines [10-13,26-29]. In order to acquire a PA image, the radio frequency signal sequences of a clinical US machine must be modified. In US imaging, a transducer transmits US waves and receives the reflected US echoes. However, in PA imaging, the laser irradiation induces acoustic waves in the medium, so the US transducer only needs to receive the generated PA waves, instead of transmitting US waves. Therefore, the transmitting function of a clinical US system must be blocked in order to acquire a PA image. Furthermore, the beamforming algorithm must be modified to enable one-way detection. In order to modify the beamforming algorithm, the raw data of the received PA signal must be accessible. Thus, a US system can be modified to provide PA/US imaging ability by simply adding a pulsed laser source (Fig. 2A) [10].

Bottom Line: Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information.Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy.This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departments of Electrical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a hybrid biomedical imaging method that exploits both acoustical Epub ahead of print and optical properties and can provide both functional and structural information. Therefore, PA imaging can complement other imaging methods, such as ultrasound imaging, fluorescence imaging, optical coherence tomography, and multi-photon microscopy. This article reviews techniques that integrate PA with the above imaging methods and describes their applications.

No MeSH data available.