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Cell type-dependent changes in CdSe/ZnS quantum dot uptake and toxic endpoints.

Manshian BB, Soenen SJ, Al-Ali A, Brown A, Hondow N, Wills J, Jenkins GJ, Doak SH - Toxicol. Sci. (2015)

Bottom Line: Following thorough physicochemical characterization, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and gross chromosomal damage were measured.BEAS-2B cells demonstrated the highest level of QDs uptake yet displayed a strong resilience with minimal genotoxicity following exposure to these NPs.Thus, this study demonstrates that in addition to nanomaterial physicochemical characterization, a clear understanding of cell type-dependent variation in uptake coupled to the inherently different capacities of the cell types to cope with exposure to these exogenous materials are all required to predict genotoxicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: *Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK, Department of Medicine, Biomedical NMR Unit-MoSAIC, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium and Institute for Materials Research, SCaPE, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK *Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK, Department of Medicine, Biomedical NMR Unit-MoSAIC, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium and Institute for Materials Research, SCaPE, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK s.h.doak@swansea.ac.uk.

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Micronucleus induction following exposure of human cells to QDs. (A) HFF-1, (B) BEAS-2B, and (C) TK6 cells exposed to amine- and carboxyl-QDs for 1 and 3 cell cycles time points in full and reduced serum containing media. Data are presented as mean ± SD. The MN frequency for the 0.01 µg/ml MMC positive control was 3.08 ± 0.44%, 2.3 ± 0.45%, and 5.2 ± 0.457% for TK6, HFF-1, and BEAS-2B cells, respectively. Where appropriate, the degree of significance is indicated (*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001).
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kfv002-F5: Micronucleus induction following exposure of human cells to QDs. (A) HFF-1, (B) BEAS-2B, and (C) TK6 cells exposed to amine- and carboxyl-QDs for 1 and 3 cell cycles time points in full and reduced serum containing media. Data are presented as mean ± SD. The MN frequency for the 0.01 µg/ml MMC positive control was 3.08 ± 0.44%, 2.3 ± 0.45%, and 5.2 ± 0.457% for TK6, HFF-1, and BEAS-2B cells, respectively. Where appropriate, the degree of significance is indicated (*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001).

Mentions: Chromosomal damage was analyzed by the CBMN assay, with MN scored in a minimum of 6000 binucleated cells per exposure concentration to enhance sensitivity of the test system. Of the 2 types of QDs examined, only the carboxyl-QD induced chromosomal damage in full serum containing media. The carboxyl-QDs resulted in a significant increase in MN frequency at several exposure concentrations in both TK6 and HFF-1 cells after 1 cell cycle exposures (Fig. 5). Prolonged exposure to carboxyl-QDs for 3 cell cycles in TK6 cells resulted in an increase in MN induction (Fig. 5F). HFF-1 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in MN following exposure to amine-QDs up to 10 nM in media with reduced serum (Fig. 5A). No MN was detected in BEAS-2B cells exposed to either of the QDs (Figs. 5C and 5D). Therefore, no further analyses were conducted on these cell types due to the absence of any significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.FIG. 5.


Cell type-dependent changes in CdSe/ZnS quantum dot uptake and toxic endpoints.

Manshian BB, Soenen SJ, Al-Ali A, Brown A, Hondow N, Wills J, Jenkins GJ, Doak SH - Toxicol. Sci. (2015)

Micronucleus induction following exposure of human cells to QDs. (A) HFF-1, (B) BEAS-2B, and (C) TK6 cells exposed to amine- and carboxyl-QDs for 1 and 3 cell cycles time points in full and reduced serum containing media. Data are presented as mean ± SD. The MN frequency for the 0.01 µg/ml MMC positive control was 3.08 ± 0.44%, 2.3 ± 0.45%, and 5.2 ± 0.457% for TK6, HFF-1, and BEAS-2B cells, respectively. Where appropriate, the degree of significance is indicated (*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372665&req=5

kfv002-F5: Micronucleus induction following exposure of human cells to QDs. (A) HFF-1, (B) BEAS-2B, and (C) TK6 cells exposed to amine- and carboxyl-QDs for 1 and 3 cell cycles time points in full and reduced serum containing media. Data are presented as mean ± SD. The MN frequency for the 0.01 µg/ml MMC positive control was 3.08 ± 0.44%, 2.3 ± 0.45%, and 5.2 ± 0.457% for TK6, HFF-1, and BEAS-2B cells, respectively. Where appropriate, the degree of significance is indicated (*P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001).
Mentions: Chromosomal damage was analyzed by the CBMN assay, with MN scored in a minimum of 6000 binucleated cells per exposure concentration to enhance sensitivity of the test system. Of the 2 types of QDs examined, only the carboxyl-QD induced chromosomal damage in full serum containing media. The carboxyl-QDs resulted in a significant increase in MN frequency at several exposure concentrations in both TK6 and HFF-1 cells after 1 cell cycle exposures (Fig. 5). Prolonged exposure to carboxyl-QDs for 3 cell cycles in TK6 cells resulted in an increase in MN induction (Fig. 5F). HFF-1 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in MN following exposure to amine-QDs up to 10 nM in media with reduced serum (Fig. 5A). No MN was detected in BEAS-2B cells exposed to either of the QDs (Figs. 5C and 5D). Therefore, no further analyses were conducted on these cell types due to the absence of any significant cytotoxic and genotoxic effects.FIG. 5.

Bottom Line: Following thorough physicochemical characterization, cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and gross chromosomal damage were measured.BEAS-2B cells demonstrated the highest level of QDs uptake yet displayed a strong resilience with minimal genotoxicity following exposure to these NPs.Thus, this study demonstrates that in addition to nanomaterial physicochemical characterization, a clear understanding of cell type-dependent variation in uptake coupled to the inherently different capacities of the cell types to cope with exposure to these exogenous materials are all required to predict genotoxicity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: *Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK, Department of Medicine, Biomedical NMR Unit-MoSAIC, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium and Institute for Materials Research, SCaPE, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK *Institute of Life Science, College of Medicine, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP, UK, Department of Medicine, Biomedical NMR Unit-MoSAIC, KU Leuven, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium and Institute for Materials Research, SCaPE, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT, UK s.h.doak@swansea.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus