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Circulating 20S proteasome is independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients.

Fukasawa H, Kaneko M, Niwa H, Matsuyama T, Yasuda H, Kumagai H, Furuya R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Multiple regression analyses showed that 20S proteasome was a significant independent predictor of abdominal muscle area (P < 0.05).In conclusion, plasma 20S proteasome concentrations were independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients.Our findings indicate a relationship between circulating 20S proteasomes and muscle metabolism in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Renal Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Iwata City Hospital, Iwata, Shizuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Protein-energy wasting is highly prevalent in hemodialysis patients, and it contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for intracellular protein degradation and it is involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes. However, the role of this system in the determination of nutritional status is largely unknown. To examine a relationship between protein-energy wasting and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a cross-sectional study of 76 hemodialysis patients was performed. Plasma concentrations of 20S proteasome were studied to evaluate its association with muscle and fat mass, which were investigated by abdominal muscle and fat areas measured using computed tomography and by creatinine production estimated using the creatinine kinetic model. Plasma 20S proteasome concentrations significantly and negatively correlated with abdominal muscle areas and creatinine production (rho = -0.263, P < 0.05 and rho = -0.241, P < 0.05, respectively), but not abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat areas. Multiple regression analyses showed that 20S proteasome was a significant independent predictor of abdominal muscle area (P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma 20S proteasome concentrations were independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients. Our findings indicate a relationship between circulating 20S proteasomes and muscle metabolism in these patients.

Trial registration: UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000012341.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Association between abdominal muscle areas and 20S proteasome levels.
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pone.0121352.g002: Association between abdominal muscle areas and 20S proteasome levels.

Mentions: Significant negative correlations were observed between the 20S proteasome levels and dry weight (P < 0.05), phosphate (P < 0.001), intact PTH (P < 0.05), AMA (P < 0.05, Fig. 2), AMA standardized for height (P < 0.05) and the Cr production rate (P < 0.05). Conversely, the 20S proteasome levels were not correlated with age, gender, dialysis vintage, height, nPNA, GNRI, log-transformed IL-6, ASFA, ASFA standardized for height, AVFA and AVFA standardized for height (Table 2).


Circulating 20S proteasome is independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients.

Fukasawa H, Kaneko M, Niwa H, Matsuyama T, Yasuda H, Kumagai H, Furuya R - PLoS ONE (2015)

Association between abdominal muscle areas and 20S proteasome levels.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4372611&req=5

pone.0121352.g002: Association between abdominal muscle areas and 20S proteasome levels.
Mentions: Significant negative correlations were observed between the 20S proteasome levels and dry weight (P < 0.05), phosphate (P < 0.001), intact PTH (P < 0.05), AMA (P < 0.05, Fig. 2), AMA standardized for height (P < 0.05) and the Cr production rate (P < 0.05). Conversely, the 20S proteasome levels were not correlated with age, gender, dialysis vintage, height, nPNA, GNRI, log-transformed IL-6, ASFA, ASFA standardized for height, AVFA and AVFA standardized for height (Table 2).

Bottom Line: Multiple regression analyses showed that 20S proteasome was a significant independent predictor of abdominal muscle area (P < 0.05).In conclusion, plasma 20S proteasome concentrations were independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients.Our findings indicate a relationship between circulating 20S proteasomes and muscle metabolism in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Renal Division, Department of Internal Medicine, Iwata City Hospital, Iwata, Shizuoka, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Unlabelled: Protein-energy wasting is highly prevalent in hemodialysis patients, and it contributes to patient morbidity and mortality. The ubiquitin-proteasome system is the major pathway for intracellular protein degradation and it is involved in the regulation of basic cellular processes. However, the role of this system in the determination of nutritional status is largely unknown. To examine a relationship between protein-energy wasting and the ubiquitin-proteasome system, a cross-sectional study of 76 hemodialysis patients was performed. Plasma concentrations of 20S proteasome were studied to evaluate its association with muscle and fat mass, which were investigated by abdominal muscle and fat areas measured using computed tomography and by creatinine production estimated using the creatinine kinetic model. Plasma 20S proteasome concentrations significantly and negatively correlated with abdominal muscle areas and creatinine production (rho = -0.263, P < 0.05 and rho = -0.241, P < 0.05, respectively), but not abdominal subcutaneous and visceral fat areas. Multiple regression analyses showed that 20S proteasome was a significant independent predictor of abdominal muscle area (P < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma 20S proteasome concentrations were independently associated with abdominal muscle mass in hemodialysis patients. Our findings indicate a relationship between circulating 20S proteasomes and muscle metabolism in these patients.

Trial registration: UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000012341.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus