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Erotic stimulus processing under amisulpride and reboxetine: a placebo-controlled fMRI study in healthy subjects.

Graf H, Wiegers M, Metzger CD, Walter M, Grön G, Abler B - Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Impaired sexual function is increasingly recognized as a side effect of psychopharmacological treatment.Altered neural activations correlated with decreased sexual interest.In line with previous interpretations of the role of the caudate nucleus in the context of primary reward processing, attenuated caudate activation may reflect detrimental effects on motivational aspects of erotic stimulus processing under noradrenergic agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry III, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany (Drs Graf, Wiegers, Grön, and Abler); Department of Psychiatry, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany (Drs Metzger and Walter); Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany (Drs Metzger and Walter). heiko.graf@uni-ulm.de.

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A, Mean total scores (SD) in the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Overall, subjective sexual functioning was significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine compared with placebo and amisulpride. Sexual functioning did not differ between amisulpride and placebo. * = indicates statistical significance (post-hoc; P<0.05); higher values describe greater subjectively perceived impairment of sexual functioning. B, Mean total scores (SD) of each subscale in the MGH-SFQ. Sexual arousal, the ability to achieve orgasm, and the ability to achieve and maintain erection were significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine (R) compared with placebo (P) and amisulpride (A). Sexual satisfaction was lower under reboxetine compared with amisulpride, whereas amisulpride and placebo did not differ regarding sexual functioning. * = indicates statistical significance (P<0.05 from post-hoc Newman-Keuls tests).
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Figure 1: A, Mean total scores (SD) in the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Overall, subjective sexual functioning was significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine compared with placebo and amisulpride. Sexual functioning did not differ between amisulpride and placebo. * = indicates statistical significance (post-hoc; P<0.05); higher values describe greater subjectively perceived impairment of sexual functioning. B, Mean total scores (SD) of each subscale in the MGH-SFQ. Sexual arousal, the ability to achieve orgasm, and the ability to achieve and maintain erection were significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine (R) compared with placebo (P) and amisulpride (A). Sexual satisfaction was lower under reboxetine compared with amisulpride, whereas amisulpride and placebo did not differ regarding sexual functioning. * = indicates statistical significance (P<0.05 from post-hoc Newman-Keuls tests).

Mentions: The mean overall score in the MHG-SFQ upon enrollment was 10.7 (SD 1.70) and 11.7 (SD 2.50) under placebo. Paired t-testing revealed no significant difference between placebo and enrollment scores (t(18)=−1.55; P=0.138), and MGH-SFQ-data upon enrollment were not considered further. Treatment effects on sum-scores in the MHG-SFQ were significant (F(2,36)=8.10; P=0.001). Post-hoc tests (Newman Keuls) confirmed more impaired sexual functioning under the SNRI reboxetine compared with both placebo (P=0.002) and amisulpride (P=0.003). Sexual functioning under the antidopaminergic drug amisulpride did not differ from placebo (P=0.850). Considering the different subscales (Table 1), reboxetine had detrimental effects relative to either placebo or amisulpride for sexual arousal, orgasm, and the ability to achieve/maintain an erection. Reduced sexual satisfaction was also observed under reboxetine relative to amisulpride, but not when compared with placebo. Comparisons between amisulpride and placebo did not reveal significant differences in any of the subscales (Figure 1A-B).


Erotic stimulus processing under amisulpride and reboxetine: a placebo-controlled fMRI study in healthy subjects.

Graf H, Wiegers M, Metzger CD, Walter M, Grön G, Abler B - Int. J. Neuropsychopharmacol. (2014)

A, Mean total scores (SD) in the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Overall, subjective sexual functioning was significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine compared with placebo and amisulpride. Sexual functioning did not differ between amisulpride and placebo. * = indicates statistical significance (post-hoc; P<0.05); higher values describe greater subjectively perceived impairment of sexual functioning. B, Mean total scores (SD) of each subscale in the MGH-SFQ. Sexual arousal, the ability to achieve orgasm, and the ability to achieve and maintain erection were significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine (R) compared with placebo (P) and amisulpride (A). Sexual satisfaction was lower under reboxetine compared with amisulpride, whereas amisulpride and placebo did not differ regarding sexual functioning. * = indicates statistical significance (P<0.05 from post-hoc Newman-Keuls tests).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
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Figure 1: A, Mean total scores (SD) in the Massachusetts General Hospital Sexual Functioning Questionnaire (MGH-SFQ). Overall, subjective sexual functioning was significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine compared with placebo and amisulpride. Sexual functioning did not differ between amisulpride and placebo. * = indicates statistical significance (post-hoc; P<0.05); higher values describe greater subjectively perceived impairment of sexual functioning. B, Mean total scores (SD) of each subscale in the MGH-SFQ. Sexual arousal, the ability to achieve orgasm, and the ability to achieve and maintain erection were significantly (P<0.05) impaired under reboxetine (R) compared with placebo (P) and amisulpride (A). Sexual satisfaction was lower under reboxetine compared with amisulpride, whereas amisulpride and placebo did not differ regarding sexual functioning. * = indicates statistical significance (P<0.05 from post-hoc Newman-Keuls tests).
Mentions: The mean overall score in the MHG-SFQ upon enrollment was 10.7 (SD 1.70) and 11.7 (SD 2.50) under placebo. Paired t-testing revealed no significant difference between placebo and enrollment scores (t(18)=−1.55; P=0.138), and MGH-SFQ-data upon enrollment were not considered further. Treatment effects on sum-scores in the MHG-SFQ were significant (F(2,36)=8.10; P=0.001). Post-hoc tests (Newman Keuls) confirmed more impaired sexual functioning under the SNRI reboxetine compared with both placebo (P=0.002) and amisulpride (P=0.003). Sexual functioning under the antidopaminergic drug amisulpride did not differ from placebo (P=0.850). Considering the different subscales (Table 1), reboxetine had detrimental effects relative to either placebo or amisulpride for sexual arousal, orgasm, and the ability to achieve/maintain an erection. Reduced sexual satisfaction was also observed under reboxetine relative to amisulpride, but not when compared with placebo. Comparisons between amisulpride and placebo did not reveal significant differences in any of the subscales (Figure 1A-B).

Bottom Line: Impaired sexual function is increasingly recognized as a side effect of psychopharmacological treatment.Altered neural activations correlated with decreased sexual interest.In line with previous interpretations of the role of the caudate nucleus in the context of primary reward processing, attenuated caudate activation may reflect detrimental effects on motivational aspects of erotic stimulus processing under noradrenergic agents.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry III, Ulm University, Ulm, Germany (Drs Graf, Wiegers, Grön, and Abler); Department of Psychiatry, Otto von Guericke University, Magdeburg, Germany (Drs Metzger and Walter); Leibniz Institute for Neurobiology, Magdeburg, Germany (Drs Metzger and Walter). heiko.graf@uni-ulm.de.

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Related in: MedlinePlus