Limits...
Benefits of a working memory training program for inattention in daily life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Spencer-Smith M, Klingberg T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Subgroup analyses showed this significant effect was observed in groups of children and adults as well as users with and without ADHD, and in studies using control groups that were active and non-adaptive, wait-list and passive as well as studies using specific or general measures.Benefits of a WM training program generalise to improvements in everyday functioning.Initial evidence shows that the Cogmed method has significant benefits for inattention in daily life with a clinically relevant effect size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many common disorders across the lifespan feature impaired working memory (WM). Reported benefits of a WM training program include improving inattention in daily life, but this has not been evaluated in a meta-analysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether one WM training method has benefits for inattention in daily life by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: We searched Medline and PsycINFO, relevant journals and contacted authors for studies with an intervention and control group reporting post-training estimates of inattention in daily life. To reduce the influence of different WM training methods on the findings, the review was restricted to trials evaluating the Cogmed method. A meta-analysis calculated the pooled standardised difference in means (SMD) between intervention and control groups.

Results: A total of 622 studies were identified and 12 studies with 13 group comparisons met inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed a significant training effect on inattention in daily life, SMD=-0.47, 95% CI -0.65, -0.29, p<.00001. Subgroup analyses showed this significant effect was observed in groups of children and adults as well as users with and without ADHD, and in studies using control groups that were active and non-adaptive, wait-list and passive as well as studies using specific or general measures. Seven of the studies reported follow-up assessment and a meta-analysis showed persisting training benefits for inattention in daily life, SMD=-0.33, 95% CI -0.57 -0.09, p=.006. Additional meta-analyses confirmed improvements after training on visuospatial WM, SMD=0.66, 95% CI 0.43, 0.89, p<.00001, and verbal WM tasks, SMD=0.40, 95% CI 0.18, 0.62, p=.0004.

Conclusions: Benefits of a WM training program generalise to improvements in everyday functioning. Initial evidence shows that the Cogmed method has significant benefits for inattention in daily life with a clinically relevant effect size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flow diagram for the systematic search and selection of studies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4368783&req=5

pone.0119522.g001: Flow diagram for the systematic search and selection of studies.

Mentions: A total of 622 articles were identified and reviewed for inclusion: 618 articles were identified by systematically searching electronic databases (192 duplicates), 3 articles were identified by searching relevant journals, and 1 article identified from contacting researchers for unpublished data. The dataset included 12 studies that met inclusion criteria with 13 group comparisons of the Cogmed program. All studies were randomised controlled trials. See Fig. 1 for a flow diagram of study selection and Table 1 for a summary of the methodological and participant characteristics of the identified studies. One study was not included in analyses because inattention in daily life ratings were not reported in the paper due to missing data [46]. The final dataset used in analyses included 11 studies and 12 group comparisons of the Cogmed program.


Benefits of a working memory training program for inattention in daily life: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Spencer-Smith M, Klingberg T - PLoS ONE (2015)

Flow diagram for the systematic search and selection of studies.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4368783&req=5

pone.0119522.g001: Flow diagram for the systematic search and selection of studies.
Mentions: A total of 622 articles were identified and reviewed for inclusion: 618 articles were identified by systematically searching electronic databases (192 duplicates), 3 articles were identified by searching relevant journals, and 1 article identified from contacting researchers for unpublished data. The dataset included 12 studies that met inclusion criteria with 13 group comparisons of the Cogmed program. All studies were randomised controlled trials. See Fig. 1 for a flow diagram of study selection and Table 1 for a summary of the methodological and participant characteristics of the identified studies. One study was not included in analyses because inattention in daily life ratings were not reported in the paper due to missing data [46]. The final dataset used in analyses included 11 studies and 12 group comparisons of the Cogmed program.

Bottom Line: Subgroup analyses showed this significant effect was observed in groups of children and adults as well as users with and without ADHD, and in studies using control groups that were active and non-adaptive, wait-list and passive as well as studies using specific or general measures.Benefits of a WM training program generalise to improvements in everyday functioning.Initial evidence shows that the Cogmed method has significant benefits for inattention in daily life with a clinically relevant effect size.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Psychological Sciences, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Many common disorders across the lifespan feature impaired working memory (WM). Reported benefits of a WM training program include improving inattention in daily life, but this has not been evaluated in a meta-analysis. This study aimed to evaluate whether one WM training method has benefits for inattention in daily life by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Methods: We searched Medline and PsycINFO, relevant journals and contacted authors for studies with an intervention and control group reporting post-training estimates of inattention in daily life. To reduce the influence of different WM training methods on the findings, the review was restricted to trials evaluating the Cogmed method. A meta-analysis calculated the pooled standardised difference in means (SMD) between intervention and control groups.

Results: A total of 622 studies were identified and 12 studies with 13 group comparisons met inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed a significant training effect on inattention in daily life, SMD=-0.47, 95% CI -0.65, -0.29, p<.00001. Subgroup analyses showed this significant effect was observed in groups of children and adults as well as users with and without ADHD, and in studies using control groups that were active and non-adaptive, wait-list and passive as well as studies using specific or general measures. Seven of the studies reported follow-up assessment and a meta-analysis showed persisting training benefits for inattention in daily life, SMD=-0.33, 95% CI -0.57 -0.09, p=.006. Additional meta-analyses confirmed improvements after training on visuospatial WM, SMD=0.66, 95% CI 0.43, 0.89, p<.00001, and verbal WM tasks, SMD=0.40, 95% CI 0.18, 0.62, p=.0004.

Conclusions: Benefits of a WM training program generalise to improvements in everyday functioning. Initial evidence shows that the Cogmed method has significant benefits for inattention in daily life with a clinically relevant effect size.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus