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The Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries at risk from overexploitation.

Tsikliras AC, Dinouli A, Tsiros VZ, Tsalkou E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: All indicators confirmed that the fisheries resources of the Mediterranean and Black Sea are at risk from overexploitation.The pattern of exploitation and the state of stocks differed among the western (W), central (C) and eastern (E) Mediterranean subareas and the Black Sea (BS), with the E Mediterranean and BS fisheries being in a worst shape.Our results confirm the need for detailed and extensive stock assessments across species that will eventually lead to stocks recovering through conservation and management measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Ichthyology, Department of Zoology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The status of the Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries was evaluated for the period 1970-2010 on a subarea basis, using various indicators including the temporal variability of total landings, the number of recorded stocks, the mean trophic level of the catch, the fishing-in-balance index and the catch-based method of stock classification. All indicators confirmed that the fisheries resources of the Mediterranean and Black Sea are at risk from overexploitation. The pattern of exploitation and the state of stocks differed among the western (W), central (C) and eastern (E) Mediterranean subareas and the Black Sea (BS), with the E Mediterranean and BS fisheries being in a worst shape. Indeed, in the E Mediterranean and the BS, total landings, mean trophic level of the catch and fishing-in-balance index were declining, the cumulative percentage of overexploited and collapsed stocks was higher, and the percentage of developing stocks was lower, compared to the W and C Mediterranean. Our results confirm the need for detailed and extensive stock assessments across species that will eventually lead to stocks recovering through conservation and management measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Theoretical plot of the stock status definitions (as they appear on Table 1, but excluding “recovering” for simplicity purposes) based on the relationship between the ratio of the latest catch (Y) to historically maximum catch (YMAX) and their relationship with the ratio of current fishing mortality (F) to mortality at MSY (FMSY).
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pone.0121188.g010: Theoretical plot of the stock status definitions (as they appear on Table 1, but excluding “recovering” for simplicity purposes) based on the relationship between the ratio of the latest catch (Y) to historically maximum catch (YMAX) and their relationship with the ratio of current fishing mortality (F) to mortality at MSY (FMSY).

Mentions: The relationship between the F/FMSY ratio and the Y2010/YMAX ratio was expressed by an inverse power function (Fig. 9), which shows that high fishing mortality rates may lead to low yields and stock collapses. According to the theoretical plot of this relationship (Fig. 10, sensu [50,51]), out of the 97 stocks from the entire Mediterranean Sea that were analyzed (Fig. 9), 44 stocks (45%) were fully exploited, 48 (49%) were overexploited, and 5 stocks (6%) were collapsed. No undeveloped/developing stocks were recorded (data not shown).


The Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries at risk from overexploitation.

Tsikliras AC, Dinouli A, Tsiros VZ, Tsalkou E - PLoS ONE (2015)

Theoretical plot of the stock status definitions (as they appear on Table 1, but excluding “recovering” for simplicity purposes) based on the relationship between the ratio of the latest catch (Y) to historically maximum catch (YMAX) and their relationship with the ratio of current fishing mortality (F) to mortality at MSY (FMSY).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4368760&req=5

pone.0121188.g010: Theoretical plot of the stock status definitions (as they appear on Table 1, but excluding “recovering” for simplicity purposes) based on the relationship between the ratio of the latest catch (Y) to historically maximum catch (YMAX) and their relationship with the ratio of current fishing mortality (F) to mortality at MSY (FMSY).
Mentions: The relationship between the F/FMSY ratio and the Y2010/YMAX ratio was expressed by an inverse power function (Fig. 9), which shows that high fishing mortality rates may lead to low yields and stock collapses. According to the theoretical plot of this relationship (Fig. 10, sensu [50,51]), out of the 97 stocks from the entire Mediterranean Sea that were analyzed (Fig. 9), 44 stocks (45%) were fully exploited, 48 (49%) were overexploited, and 5 stocks (6%) were collapsed. No undeveloped/developing stocks were recorded (data not shown).

Bottom Line: All indicators confirmed that the fisheries resources of the Mediterranean and Black Sea are at risk from overexploitation.The pattern of exploitation and the state of stocks differed among the western (W), central (C) and eastern (E) Mediterranean subareas and the Black Sea (BS), with the E Mediterranean and BS fisheries being in a worst shape.Our results confirm the need for detailed and extensive stock assessments across species that will eventually lead to stocks recovering through conservation and management measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Ichthyology, Department of Zoology, School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT
The status of the Mediterranean and Black Sea fisheries was evaluated for the period 1970-2010 on a subarea basis, using various indicators including the temporal variability of total landings, the number of recorded stocks, the mean trophic level of the catch, the fishing-in-balance index and the catch-based method of stock classification. All indicators confirmed that the fisheries resources of the Mediterranean and Black Sea are at risk from overexploitation. The pattern of exploitation and the state of stocks differed among the western (W), central (C) and eastern (E) Mediterranean subareas and the Black Sea (BS), with the E Mediterranean and BS fisheries being in a worst shape. Indeed, in the E Mediterranean and the BS, total landings, mean trophic level of the catch and fishing-in-balance index were declining, the cumulative percentage of overexploited and collapsed stocks was higher, and the percentage of developing stocks was lower, compared to the W and C Mediterranean. Our results confirm the need for detailed and extensive stock assessments across species that will eventually lead to stocks recovering through conservation and management measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus