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Variation in pollen-donor composition among pollinators in an entomophilous tree species, Castanea crenata, revealed by single-pollen genotyping.

Hasegawa Y, Suyama Y, Seiwa K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: However, little evidence is available on how and to what extent the pollen carryover affects the pollen-donor composition and on which insect taxa are effective outcross-pollen transporters under field conditions.The effective number of pollen donors, representing pollen carryover, was greater in bumblebees (9.71) than in flies (3.40), small bees (3.32), and small beetles (3.06).The high percentages of pollen from outside the plot on bumblebees (65.4%) and flies (71.2%) compared to small bees (35.3%) and small beetles (13.5%) demonstrated their longer pollen dispersal distances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Osaki, Miyagi, Japan; Institute of Wood Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Noshiro, Akita, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: In plants, reproductive success is largely determined by the composition of pollen (i.e., self-pollen and outcross-pollen from near and distant pollen-donors) transported as a result of pollinator foraging behavior (e.g., pollen carryover). However, little evidence is available on how and to what extent the pollen carryover affects the pollen-donor composition and on which insect taxa are effective outcross-pollen transporters under field conditions. In this study, we explored roles of foraging behavior of insect pollinators on pollen-donor composition and subsequent reproductive success in a woody plant.

Methods: We performed paternity analyses based on microsatellite genotyping of individual pollen grains found on diurnal pollinators (i.e., bumblebee, small bee, fly, small beetle, and honeybee) visiting Castanea crenata trees.

Results: The outcross-pollen rate was highest in bumblebees (66%), followed by small bees (35%), flies (31%), and small beetles (18%). The effective number of pollen donors, representing pollen carryover, was greater in bumblebees (9.71) than in flies (3.40), small bees (3.32), and small beetles (3.06). The high percentages of pollen from outside the plot on bumblebees (65.4%) and flies (71.2%) compared to small bees (35.3%) and small beetles (13.5%) demonstrated their longer pollen dispersal distances.

Conclusions: All of the diurnal insects carried outcross-pollen grains for long distances via pollen carryover. This fact suggests that a wide range of insect taxa are potential outcross-pollen transporters for the self-incompatible C. crenata.

No MeSH data available.


Proportion of outcross-pollen grains found on insects visiting Castanea crenata.Circles and bars represent each individual insect samples and the average value for each insect group, respectively. Values with different letters are significantly different at P < 0.008 (GLMM with Bonferroni adjustment). Bumblebee, n = 6; small bee, n = 5; fly, n = 8; small beetle, n = 9.
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pone.0120393.g002: Proportion of outcross-pollen grains found on insects visiting Castanea crenata.Circles and bars represent each individual insect samples and the average value for each insect group, respectively. Values with different letters are significantly different at P < 0.008 (GLMM with Bonferroni adjustment). Bumblebee, n = 6; small bee, n = 5; fly, n = 8; small beetle, n = 9.

Mentions: Of the pollen grains analyzed (n = 824), 300 (36.4%) were identified as outcross-pollen. The outcross-pollen rate was greatest in the bumblebee (mean ± SE; 66 ± 10%), followed by the small bee (35 ± 18%), fly (31 ± 9%), and small beetle (18 ± 10%; GLMM, P < 0.008; Fig. 2). The rate was not statistically different between the small bee and fly (GLMM, P > 0.008; Fig. 2).


Variation in pollen-donor composition among pollinators in an entomophilous tree species, Castanea crenata, revealed by single-pollen genotyping.

Hasegawa Y, Suyama Y, Seiwa K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Proportion of outcross-pollen grains found on insects visiting Castanea crenata.Circles and bars represent each individual insect samples and the average value for each insect group, respectively. Values with different letters are significantly different at P < 0.008 (GLMM with Bonferroni adjustment). Bumblebee, n = 6; small bee, n = 5; fly, n = 8; small beetle, n = 9.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4368697&req=5

pone.0120393.g002: Proportion of outcross-pollen grains found on insects visiting Castanea crenata.Circles and bars represent each individual insect samples and the average value for each insect group, respectively. Values with different letters are significantly different at P < 0.008 (GLMM with Bonferroni adjustment). Bumblebee, n = 6; small bee, n = 5; fly, n = 8; small beetle, n = 9.
Mentions: Of the pollen grains analyzed (n = 824), 300 (36.4%) were identified as outcross-pollen. The outcross-pollen rate was greatest in the bumblebee (mean ± SE; 66 ± 10%), followed by the small bee (35 ± 18%), fly (31 ± 9%), and small beetle (18 ± 10%; GLMM, P < 0.008; Fig. 2). The rate was not statistically different between the small bee and fly (GLMM, P > 0.008; Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: However, little evidence is available on how and to what extent the pollen carryover affects the pollen-donor composition and on which insect taxa are effective outcross-pollen transporters under field conditions.The effective number of pollen donors, representing pollen carryover, was greater in bumblebees (9.71) than in flies (3.40), small bees (3.32), and small beetles (3.06).The high percentages of pollen from outside the plot on bumblebees (65.4%) and flies (71.2%) compared to small bees (35.3%) and small beetles (13.5%) demonstrated their longer pollen dispersal distances.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Tohoku University, Osaki, Miyagi, Japan; Institute of Wood Technology, Akita Prefectural University, Noshiro, Akita, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: In plants, reproductive success is largely determined by the composition of pollen (i.e., self-pollen and outcross-pollen from near and distant pollen-donors) transported as a result of pollinator foraging behavior (e.g., pollen carryover). However, little evidence is available on how and to what extent the pollen carryover affects the pollen-donor composition and on which insect taxa are effective outcross-pollen transporters under field conditions. In this study, we explored roles of foraging behavior of insect pollinators on pollen-donor composition and subsequent reproductive success in a woody plant.

Methods: We performed paternity analyses based on microsatellite genotyping of individual pollen grains found on diurnal pollinators (i.e., bumblebee, small bee, fly, small beetle, and honeybee) visiting Castanea crenata trees.

Results: The outcross-pollen rate was highest in bumblebees (66%), followed by small bees (35%), flies (31%), and small beetles (18%). The effective number of pollen donors, representing pollen carryover, was greater in bumblebees (9.71) than in flies (3.40), small bees (3.32), and small beetles (3.06). The high percentages of pollen from outside the plot on bumblebees (65.4%) and flies (71.2%) compared to small bees (35.3%) and small beetles (13.5%) demonstrated their longer pollen dispersal distances.

Conclusions: All of the diurnal insects carried outcross-pollen grains for long distances via pollen carryover. This fact suggests that a wide range of insect taxa are potential outcross-pollen transporters for the self-incompatible C. crenata.

No MeSH data available.