Limits...
Default mode network connectivity as a function of familial and environmental risk for psychotic disorder.

Peeters SC, van de Ven V, Gronenschild EH, Patel AX, Habets P, Goebel R, van Os J, Marcelis M, Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (G.R.O.U.P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Research suggests that altered interregional connectivity in specific networks, such as the default mode network (DMN), is associated with cognitive and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia.In addition, there were no significant interactions between group and environmental exposures in the model of PCC functional connectivity.The association between familial risk and DMN connectivity was not conditional on environmental exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Psychiatry and Psychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Research suggests that altered interregional connectivity in specific networks, such as the default mode network (DMN), is associated with cognitive and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. In addition, frontal and limbic connectivity alterations have been associated with trauma, drug use and urban upbringing, though these environmental exposures have never been examined in relation to DMN functional connectivity in psychotic disorder.

Methods: Resting-state functional MRI scans were obtained from 73 patients with psychotic disorder, 83 non-psychotic siblings of patients with psychotic disorder and 72 healthy controls. Posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) seed-based correlation analysis was used to estimate functional connectivity within the DMN. DMN functional connectivity was examined in relation to group (familial risk), group × environmental exposure (to cannabis, developmental trauma and urbanicity) and symptomatology.

Results: There was a significant association between group and PCC connectivity with the inferior parietal lobule (IPL), the precuneus (PCu) and the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). Compared to controls, patients and siblings had increased PCC connectivity with the IPL, PCu and MPFC. In the IPL and PCu, the functional connectivity of siblings was intermediate to that of controls and patients. No significant associations were found between DMN connectivity and (subclinical) psychotic/cognitive symptoms. In addition, there were no significant interactions between group and environmental exposures in the model of PCC functional connectivity.

Discussion: Increased functional connectivity in individuals with (increased risk for) psychotic disorder may reflect trait-related network alterations. The within-network "connectivity at rest" intermediate phenotype was not associated with (subclinical) psychotic or cognitive symptoms. The association between familial risk and DMN connectivity was not conditional on environmental exposure.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean functional connectivity with 95% confidence interval for each region of the DMN that showed significant differences between the groups.There was significantly higher PCC connectivity with the left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC in siblings and patients than in controls, with no significant differences between patients and siblings.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4366233&req=5

pone.0120030.g002: Mean functional connectivity with 95% confidence interval for each region of the DMN that showed significant differences between the groups.There was significantly higher PCC connectivity with the left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC in siblings and patients than in controls, with no significant differences between patients and siblings.

Mentions: In all three groups, the PCC connectivity map showed significant positive correlations with other DMN regions, including medial frontal, lateral prefrontal, parietal and temporal areas (i.e., the hippocampal complex). The voxel-level ANCOVA revealed a between-subject (group) effect in three DMN regions: the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), the left precuneus (PCu) and the right medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) (Fig. 1, Table 2). Post-hoc analyses revealed that patients and siblings had increased connectivity between the PCC seed and left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC (Fig. 2, Table 3). No significant differences were observed between patients and siblings. Multilevel random regression analyses with XTREG did not influence the results. All significant findings were upheld after Simes correction (pSimes: p<0.033) (Table 3). Repeating the voxel-level ANCOVA and post-hoc analyses with additional confounders (tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other drugs) did not affect the pattern of results, as did the exclusion of siblings and controls with a history of affective disorder (S1 and S2 Table).


Default mode network connectivity as a function of familial and environmental risk for psychotic disorder.

Peeters SC, van de Ven V, Gronenschild EH, Patel AX, Habets P, Goebel R, van Os J, Marcelis M, Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (G.R.O.U.P - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean functional connectivity with 95% confidence interval for each region of the DMN that showed significant differences between the groups.There was significantly higher PCC connectivity with the left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC in siblings and patients than in controls, with no significant differences between patients and siblings.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4366233&req=5

pone.0120030.g002: Mean functional connectivity with 95% confidence interval for each region of the DMN that showed significant differences between the groups.There was significantly higher PCC connectivity with the left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC in siblings and patients than in controls, with no significant differences between patients and siblings.
Mentions: In all three groups, the PCC connectivity map showed significant positive correlations with other DMN regions, including medial frontal, lateral prefrontal, parietal and temporal areas (i.e., the hippocampal complex). The voxel-level ANCOVA revealed a between-subject (group) effect in three DMN regions: the left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), the left precuneus (PCu) and the right medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC) (Fig. 1, Table 2). Post-hoc analyses revealed that patients and siblings had increased connectivity between the PCC seed and left IPL, left PCu and right MPFC (Fig. 2, Table 3). No significant differences were observed between patients and siblings. Multilevel random regression analyses with XTREG did not influence the results. All significant findings were upheld after Simes correction (pSimes: p<0.033) (Table 3). Repeating the voxel-level ANCOVA and post-hoc analyses with additional confounders (tobacco, alcohol, cannabis and other drugs) did not affect the pattern of results, as did the exclusion of siblings and controls with a history of affective disorder (S1 and S2 Table).

Bottom Line: Research suggests that altered interregional connectivity in specific networks, such as the default mode network (DMN), is associated with cognitive and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia.In addition, there were no significant interactions between group and environmental exposures in the model of PCC functional connectivity.The association between familial risk and DMN connectivity was not conditional on environmental exposure.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dept. of Psychiatry and Psychology, School for Mental Health and Neuroscience, EURON, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: Research suggests that altered interregional connectivity in specific networks, such as the default mode network (DMN), is associated with cognitive and psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. In addition, frontal and limbic connectivity alterations have been associated with trauma, drug use and urban upbringing, though these environmental exposures have never been examined in relation to DMN functional connectivity in psychotic disorder.

Methods: Resting-state functional MRI scans were obtained from 73 patients with psychotic disorder, 83 non-psychotic siblings of patients with psychotic disorder and 72 healthy controls. Posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) seed-based correlation analysis was used to estimate functional connectivity within the DMN. DMN functional connectivity was examined in relation to group (familial risk), group × environmental exposure (to cannabis, developmental trauma and urbanicity) and symptomatology.

Results: There was a significant association between group and PCC connectivity with the inferior parietal lobule (IPL), the precuneus (PCu) and the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC). Compared to controls, patients and siblings had increased PCC connectivity with the IPL, PCu and MPFC. In the IPL and PCu, the functional connectivity of siblings was intermediate to that of controls and patients. No significant associations were found between DMN connectivity and (subclinical) psychotic/cognitive symptoms. In addition, there were no significant interactions between group and environmental exposures in the model of PCC functional connectivity.

Discussion: Increased functional connectivity in individuals with (increased risk for) psychotic disorder may reflect trait-related network alterations. The within-network "connectivity at rest" intermediate phenotype was not associated with (subclinical) psychotic or cognitive symptoms. The association between familial risk and DMN connectivity was not conditional on environmental exposure.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus