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Surveillance and clinical characterization of influenza in a university cohort in Singapore.

Tan AL, Virk RK, Tambyah PA, Inoue M, Lim EA, Chan KW, Chelvi CS, Ooi ST, Chua C, Tan BH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: A surveillance study was conducted from 2007 to 2009, at the University Health and Wellness Centre, National University of Singapore (NUS).The predominant subtype was A/H1N1, including both the seasonal strain (20/153) and the pandemic strain (72/153).On-campus hostel residence and being a student (compared with staff) were associated with increased risk of laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Southeast Asia is a potential locus for the emergence of novel influenza strains. However, information on influenza within the region is limited.

Objectives: This study was to determine the proportion of influenza-like illness (ILI) caused by influenza A and B viruses in a university cohort in Singapore, identify important distinctive clinical features of influenza infection and potential factors associated with influenza infection compared with other causes of ILI.

Methodology: A surveillance study was conducted from 2007 to 2009, at the University Health and Wellness Centre, National University of Singapore (NUS). Basic demographic information and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from consenting students and staff with ILI, with Influenza A and B identified by both culture and molecular methods.

Results: Proportions of influenza A and B virus infections in subjects with ILI were 153/500 (30.6%) and 11/500 (2.2%) respectively. The predominant subtype was A/H1N1, including both the seasonal strain (20/153) and the pandemic strain (72/153). The clinical symptom of fever was more common in subjects with laboratory confirmed influenza than other ILIs. On-campus hostel residence and being a student (compared with staff) were associated with increased risk of laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection.

Conclusions: This study provides a baseline prevalence of influenza infection within young adults in Singapore in a university setting. Potential risk factors, such as hostel residence, were identified, allowing for more targeted infection control measures in the event of a future influenza pandemic.

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Influenza Distribution According to Time.
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pone.0119485.g001: Influenza Distribution According to Time.

Mentions: The distribution of Influenza was clustered across different time periods (Fig. 1) although there were gaps in the collection of data during the university vacations. Influenza B was isolated more often in early 2007. Subtype A/H3N2 was noted across the entire time period of sampling. The pandemic strain of A/H1N1 was isolated only in the later half of 2009 as would be expected.


Surveillance and clinical characterization of influenza in a university cohort in Singapore.

Tan AL, Virk RK, Tambyah PA, Inoue M, Lim EA, Chan KW, Chelvi CS, Ooi ST, Chua C, Tan BH - PLoS ONE (2015)

Influenza Distribution According to Time.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4366074&req=5

pone.0119485.g001: Influenza Distribution According to Time.
Mentions: The distribution of Influenza was clustered across different time periods (Fig. 1) although there were gaps in the collection of data during the university vacations. Influenza B was isolated more often in early 2007. Subtype A/H3N2 was noted across the entire time period of sampling. The pandemic strain of A/H1N1 was isolated only in the later half of 2009 as would be expected.

Bottom Line: A surveillance study was conducted from 2007 to 2009, at the University Health and Wellness Centre, National University of Singapore (NUS).The predominant subtype was A/H1N1, including both the seasonal strain (20/153) and the pandemic strain (72/153).On-campus hostel residence and being a student (compared with staff) were associated with increased risk of laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT

Background: Southeast Asia is a potential locus for the emergence of novel influenza strains. However, information on influenza within the region is limited.

Objectives: This study was to determine the proportion of influenza-like illness (ILI) caused by influenza A and B viruses in a university cohort in Singapore, identify important distinctive clinical features of influenza infection and potential factors associated with influenza infection compared with other causes of ILI.

Methodology: A surveillance study was conducted from 2007 to 2009, at the University Health and Wellness Centre, National University of Singapore (NUS). Basic demographic information and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from consenting students and staff with ILI, with Influenza A and B identified by both culture and molecular methods.

Results: Proportions of influenza A and B virus infections in subjects with ILI were 153/500 (30.6%) and 11/500 (2.2%) respectively. The predominant subtype was A/H1N1, including both the seasonal strain (20/153) and the pandemic strain (72/153). The clinical symptom of fever was more common in subjects with laboratory confirmed influenza than other ILIs. On-campus hostel residence and being a student (compared with staff) were associated with increased risk of laboratory confirmed influenza A/H1N1 2009 infection.

Conclusions: This study provides a baseline prevalence of influenza infection within young adults in Singapore in a university setting. Potential risk factors, such as hostel residence, were identified, allowing for more targeted infection control measures in the event of a future influenza pandemic.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus