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Default mode network, motor network, dorsal and ventral basal ganglia networks in the rat brain: comparison to human networks using resting state-fMRI.

Sierakowiak A, Monnot C, Aski SN, Uppman M, Li TQ, Damberg P, Brené S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Rodent models are developed to enhance understanding of the underlying biology of different brain disorders.However, before interpreting findings from animal models in a translational aspect to understand human disease, a fundamental step is to first have knowledge of similarities and differences of the biological systems studied.In this study, we analyzed and verified four known networks termed: default mode network, motor network, dorsal basal ganglia network, and ventral basal ganglia network using resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in humans and rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Rodent models are developed to enhance understanding of the underlying biology of different brain disorders. However, before interpreting findings from animal models in a translational aspect to understand human disease, a fundamental step is to first have knowledge of similarities and differences of the biological systems studied. In this study, we analyzed and verified four known networks termed: default mode network, motor network, dorsal basal ganglia network, and ventral basal ganglia network using resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in humans and rats. Our work supports the notion that humans and rats have common robust resting state brain networks and that rsfMRI can be used as a translational tool when validating animal models of brain disorders. In the future, rsfMRI may be used, in addition to short-term interventions, to characterize longitudinal effects on functional brain networks after long-term intervention in humans and rats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Human Default Mode Network.The default mode network (DMN) was derived from a seed placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates in mm: 0; -47; 29). Top left image displays an axial, top right a sagittal and bottom image a coronal view of the human brain. Note the color-coded positive FC-values of the DMN in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus) and bilateral parietal cortex in the axial view. In the sagittal and coronal view note the anterior prefrontal cortex, bilateral parietal cortex and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus). FC-values are displayed with a pseudo-colored scale bar; with increments of 0.2 each designated a color (see the color-bar in the image).
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pone.0120345.g001: Human Default Mode Network.The default mode network (DMN) was derived from a seed placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates in mm: 0; -47; 29). Top left image displays an axial, top right a sagittal and bottom image a coronal view of the human brain. Note the color-coded positive FC-values of the DMN in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus) and bilateral parietal cortex in the axial view. In the sagittal and coronal view note the anterior prefrontal cortex, bilateral parietal cortex and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus). FC-values are displayed with a pseudo-colored scale bar; with increments of 0.2 each designated a color (see the color-bar in the image).

Mentions: In the Human Brain, the default mode network (DMN) was derived from the seed-based approach, when the seed was placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates: 0; -47; 29). As expected, and confirming previous data, a network was detected that included anterior prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus), and bilateral parietal cortex (Fig. 1) [39].


Default mode network, motor network, dorsal and ventral basal ganglia networks in the rat brain: comparison to human networks using resting state-fMRI.

Sierakowiak A, Monnot C, Aski SN, Uppman M, Li TQ, Damberg P, Brené S - PLoS ONE (2015)

Human Default Mode Network.The default mode network (DMN) was derived from a seed placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates in mm: 0; -47; 29). Top left image displays an axial, top right a sagittal and bottom image a coronal view of the human brain. Note the color-coded positive FC-values of the DMN in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus) and bilateral parietal cortex in the axial view. In the sagittal and coronal view note the anterior prefrontal cortex, bilateral parietal cortex and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus). FC-values are displayed with a pseudo-colored scale bar; with increments of 0.2 each designated a color (see the color-bar in the image).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4366046&req=5

pone.0120345.g001: Human Default Mode Network.The default mode network (DMN) was derived from a seed placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates in mm: 0; -47; 29). Top left image displays an axial, top right a sagittal and bottom image a coronal view of the human brain. Note the color-coded positive FC-values of the DMN in the posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus) and bilateral parietal cortex in the axial view. In the sagittal and coronal view note the anterior prefrontal cortex, bilateral parietal cortex and posterior cingulate/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus). FC-values are displayed with a pseudo-colored scale bar; with increments of 0.2 each designated a color (see the color-bar in the image).
Mentions: In the Human Brain, the default mode network (DMN) was derived from the seed-based approach, when the seed was placed in Posterior Cingulate Cortex (Talairach coordinates: 0; -47; 29). As expected, and confirming previous data, a network was detected that included anterior prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/retrosplenial cortex (precuneus), and bilateral parietal cortex (Fig. 1) [39].

Bottom Line: Rodent models are developed to enhance understanding of the underlying biology of different brain disorders.However, before interpreting findings from animal models in a translational aspect to understand human disease, a fundamental step is to first have knowledge of similarities and differences of the biological systems studied.In this study, we analyzed and verified four known networks termed: default mode network, motor network, dorsal basal ganglia network, and ventral basal ganglia network using resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in humans and rats.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

ABSTRACT
Rodent models are developed to enhance understanding of the underlying biology of different brain disorders. However, before interpreting findings from animal models in a translational aspect to understand human disease, a fundamental step is to first have knowledge of similarities and differences of the biological systems studied. In this study, we analyzed and verified four known networks termed: default mode network, motor network, dorsal basal ganglia network, and ventral basal ganglia network using resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) in humans and rats. Our work supports the notion that humans and rats have common robust resting state brain networks and that rsfMRI can be used as a translational tool when validating animal models of brain disorders. In the future, rsfMRI may be used, in addition to short-term interventions, to characterize longitudinal effects on functional brain networks after long-term intervention in humans and rats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus