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The role of transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: new contributions.

Lopes PM, Sepúlveda L, Ramos R, Sousa P - Radiol Bras (2015 Jan-Feb)

Bottom Line: No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172).The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule).Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intern Physician, Unit of Radiology, Hospital Distrital de Santarém, Santarém, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of transrectal prostate ultrasound in the screening for prostate neoplasias and in the guidance of prostate biopsies.

Materials and methods: Prospective study developed over a one-year period. All the patients with indication for prostate biopsy were evaluated. Regardless of PSA values, the patients underwent ultrasound in order to identify suspicious nodules (confirmed by two observers). Sextant biopsy was subsequently performed. In cases of finding suspicious nodules, an additional puncture directed to such nodules was done.

Results: In a total of 155 cases the prevalence of malignancy was of 53%. Suspicious nodules were detected in 34 patients, and 25 where malignant (positive predictive value of 74%). The specificity and sensitivity for suspicious nodules were 88% and 31% respectively. Comparatively with the randomly obtained sextant specimens, the rate of findings of neoplasia was higher in the specimens obtained with puncture directed to the nodule (p = 0.032). No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172).

Conclusion: The high positive predictive value and the high rate of findings of neoplasia in specimens of suspicious nodules should be taken into consideration in the future. The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

False positive prostate nodule. A: Cross-sectional sonographic image of prostategland showing hypoechogenic, relatively ill-defined nodule located in the middlethird of the left peripheral region. B: Sonographic image of the same regionshowing the biopsy needle within the previously described nodule. Histologicalanalysis revealed chronic nonspecific prostatitis.
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f03: False positive prostate nodule. A: Cross-sectional sonographic image of prostategland showing hypoechogenic, relatively ill-defined nodule located in the middlethird of the left peripheral region. B: Sonographic image of the same regionshowing the biopsy needle within the previously described nodule. Histologicalanalysis revealed chronic nonspecific prostatitis.


The role of transrectal ultrasound in the diagnosis of prostate cancer: new contributions.

Lopes PM, Sepúlveda L, Ramos R, Sousa P - Radiol Bras (2015 Jan-Feb)

False positive prostate nodule. A: Cross-sectional sonographic image of prostategland showing hypoechogenic, relatively ill-defined nodule located in the middlethird of the left peripheral region. B: Sonographic image of the same regionshowing the biopsy needle within the previously described nodule. Histologicalanalysis revealed chronic nonspecific prostatitis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4366021&req=5

f03: False positive prostate nodule. A: Cross-sectional sonographic image of prostategland showing hypoechogenic, relatively ill-defined nodule located in the middlethird of the left peripheral region. B: Sonographic image of the same regionshowing the biopsy needle within the previously described nodule. Histologicalanalysis revealed chronic nonspecific prostatitis.
Bottom Line: No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172).The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule).Abstract available from the publisher.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Intern Physician, Unit of Radiology, Hospital Distrital de Santarém, Santarém, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Objective: The present study was aimed at evaluating the contribution of transrectal prostate ultrasound in the screening for prostate neoplasias and in the guidance of prostate biopsies.

Materials and methods: Prospective study developed over a one-year period. All the patients with indication for prostate biopsy were evaluated. Regardless of PSA values, the patients underwent ultrasound in order to identify suspicious nodules (confirmed by two observers). Sextant biopsy was subsequently performed. In cases of finding suspicious nodules, an additional puncture directed to such nodules was done.

Results: In a total of 155 cases the prevalence of malignancy was of 53%. Suspicious nodules were detected in 34 patients, and 25 where malignant (positive predictive value of 74%). The specificity and sensitivity for suspicious nodules were 88% and 31% respectively. Comparatively with the randomly obtained sextant specimens, the rate of findings of neoplasia was higher in the specimens obtained with puncture directed to the nodule (p = 0.032). No statistically significant difference was observed in the Gleason score for both types of specimens (p = 0.172).

Conclusion: The high positive predictive value and the high rate of findings of neoplasia in specimens of suspicious nodules should be taken into consideration in the future. The authors suggest a biopsy technique similar to the one described in the present study (sextant biopsy plus puncture directed to the suspicious nodule).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus