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The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire: psychometric properties of the parent and teacher version in children aged 4-7.

Stone LL, Janssens JM, Vermulst AA, Van Der Maten M, Engels RC, Otten R - BMC Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: Omega was consistently higher than alpha regarding reliability.Further, higher SDQ scores were associated with future indices of higher inadequate parenting, higher parenting stress and lower social preference.Finally, previous results on test-retest reliability and criterion validity were replicated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, Nijmegen, 6500 HE The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire is one of the most employed screening instruments. Although there is a large research body investigating its psychometric properties, reliability and validity are not yet fully tested using modern techniques. Therefore, we investigate reliability, construct validity, measurement invariance, and predictive validity of the parent and teacher version in children aged 4-7. Besides, we intend to replicate previous studies by investigating test-retest reliability and criterion validity.

Methods: In a Dutch community sample 2,238 teachers and 1,513 parents filled out questionnaires regarding problem behaviors and parenting, while 1,831 children reported on sociometric measures at T1. These children were followed-up during three consecutive years. Reliability was examined using Cronbach's alpha and McDonald's omega, construct validity was examined by Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and predictive validity was examined by calculating developmental profiles and linking these to measures of inadequate parenting, parenting stress and social preference. Further, mean scores and percentiles were examined in order to establish norms.

Results: Omega was consistently higher than alpha regarding reliability. The original five-factor structure was replicated, and measurement invariance was established on a configural level. Further, higher SDQ scores were associated with future indices of higher inadequate parenting, higher parenting stress and lower social preference. Finally, previous results on test-retest reliability and criterion validity were replicated.

Conclusions: This study is the first to show SDQ scores are predictively valid, attesting to the feasibility of the SDQ as a screening instrument. Future research into predictive validity of the SDQ is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Developmental profiles SDQ (teacher version).
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig2: Developmental profiles SDQ (teacher version).

Mentions: In order to further investigate the predictive validity of the SDQ teacher version, the degree of coherence between the developmental pathways of SDQ scores and the scores that are indicative of the children’s likability, namely social preference, was examined. Again, we used GMM at the first step to test which model fitted the data best. Table 6 shows that when all fit statistics are taken into consideration these again argue for a model providing three developmental pathways. This can also be seen in Figure 2: One large group scores consistently low on the SDQ total score (81.4%); one group scores high and demonstrates a slight decrease over time (8.7%); and one group that starts somewhat lower than the previous group, but shows a small increase over time (9.9%).Table 6


The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire: psychometric properties of the parent and teacher version in children aged 4-7.

Stone LL, Janssens JM, Vermulst AA, Van Der Maten M, Engels RC, Otten R - BMC Psychol (2015)

Developmental profiles SDQ (teacher version).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4364334&req=5

Fig2: Developmental profiles SDQ (teacher version).
Mentions: In order to further investigate the predictive validity of the SDQ teacher version, the degree of coherence between the developmental pathways of SDQ scores and the scores that are indicative of the children’s likability, namely social preference, was examined. Again, we used GMM at the first step to test which model fitted the data best. Table 6 shows that when all fit statistics are taken into consideration these again argue for a model providing three developmental pathways. This can also be seen in Figure 2: One large group scores consistently low on the SDQ total score (81.4%); one group scores high and demonstrates a slight decrease over time (8.7%); and one group that starts somewhat lower than the previous group, but shows a small increase over time (9.9%).Table 6

Bottom Line: Omega was consistently higher than alpha regarding reliability.Further, higher SDQ scores were associated with future indices of higher inadequate parenting, higher parenting stress and lower social preference.Finally, previous results on test-retest reliability and criterion validity were replicated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Behavioural Science Institute, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, Nijmegen, 6500 HE The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Background: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire is one of the most employed screening instruments. Although there is a large research body investigating its psychometric properties, reliability and validity are not yet fully tested using modern techniques. Therefore, we investigate reliability, construct validity, measurement invariance, and predictive validity of the parent and teacher version in children aged 4-7. Besides, we intend to replicate previous studies by investigating test-retest reliability and criterion validity.

Methods: In a Dutch community sample 2,238 teachers and 1,513 parents filled out questionnaires regarding problem behaviors and parenting, while 1,831 children reported on sociometric measures at T1. These children were followed-up during three consecutive years. Reliability was examined using Cronbach's alpha and McDonald's omega, construct validity was examined by Confirmatory Factor Analysis, and predictive validity was examined by calculating developmental profiles and linking these to measures of inadequate parenting, parenting stress and social preference. Further, mean scores and percentiles were examined in order to establish norms.

Results: Omega was consistently higher than alpha regarding reliability. The original five-factor structure was replicated, and measurement invariance was established on a configural level. Further, higher SDQ scores were associated with future indices of higher inadequate parenting, higher parenting stress and lower social preference. Finally, previous results on test-retest reliability and criterion validity were replicated.

Conclusions: This study is the first to show SDQ scores are predictively valid, attesting to the feasibility of the SDQ as a screening instrument. Future research into predictive validity of the SDQ is warranted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus