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Analysis of resistance to antimicrobials and presence of virulence/stress response genes in Campylobacter isolates from patients with severe diarrhoea.

Ghunaim H, Behnke JM, Aigha I, Sharma A, Doiphode SH, Deshmukh A, Abu-Madi MM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: There was no host sex- or age-dependence among isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and no significant variation was found with the region of origin of the patients.Host sex-, age- and region of origin-dependent variations in prevalence were found for some of these factors.These results are discussed and their implications are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Campylobacter infections are a major cause of diarrhoea world-wide and two of the antimicrobials used for their control (erythromycin and ciprofloxacin) have been losing efficacy in recent years. In a sample of 174 genotyped isolates from the stools of patients with severe diarrhoea in Qatar, collected between 2005 and 2012, 63.2% showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, 8.6% to erythromycin, 0.57% to chloramphenicol and all were sensitive to gentamycin. While 33.9% of isolates were sensitive to all four antimicrobials, 59.8% were resistant to at least one, 6.3% were resistant to two and none showed resistance to three antimicrobials. There was no host sex- or age-dependence among isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and no significant variation was found with the region of origin of the patients. All isolates were screened for the presence of 3 virulence factors (ciaB, cadF and cdtB) and two stress-response factors (htrB and clpP), all of which were present in more than 50% of the isolates. Host sex-, age- and region of origin-dependent variations in prevalence were found for some of these factors. Data analysis for the combination of virulence factors and their effect on antimicrobial resistance indicated that the prevalence of resistance to both erythromycin and ciprofloxacin was higher in isolates harbouring ciaB but not clpP. Prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin was similar in clpP positive and negative isolates also possessing htrB, while for htrB-negative isolates prevalence was higher in the absence of clpP. These results are discussed and their implications are highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Prevalence of enteric bacteria in the stools of outpatients reporting to the MHC with severe diarrhoea in the period 2005–2013.The sample sizes for 2005–2013 were 2220, 1916, 2460, 2394, 2528, 2726, 3347, 4373 and 4176, respectively.
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pone.0119268.g001: Prevalence of enteric bacteria in the stools of outpatients reporting to the MHC with severe diarrhoea in the period 2005–2013.The sample sizes for 2005–2013 were 2220, 1916, 2460, 2394, 2528, 2726, 3347, 4373 and 4176, respectively.

Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the annual prevalence of pathogenic enteric bacteria in the period 2005 to 2013, in 26,140 subjects whose stools were examined because they had severe and bloody diarrhoea. The prevalence of Salmonella was the highest across the whole period (8.6% [8.28–8.96]) but there was significant variation between years (YEAR*INFECTION, χ28 = 161.2, P< 0.001). Peak prevalence was recorded in 2006 and this was followed by a consistent decline over the following years. E. coli (2.8% [2.64–3.04]), Shigella (2.8% [1.84–2.18]) and Campylobacter (1.9% [1.73–2.06]) all showed lower but similar prevalence over the whole of this period, again with some variation between years, which in all three cases was significant (χ28 = 94.9, 139.1 and 97.5, respectively and P<0.001 in all cases). As with Salmonella, there was a gradual decline in cases in the later years of the period (Fig. 1). Across the whole period, 26 cases of Aeromonas, 7 of Vibrio, and 3 of Yersinia were also detected. A detailed breakdown of the number of cases of Aeromonas, Campylobacter, E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio and Yersinia positive cases is provided as supplementary information (See S1 Table).


Analysis of resistance to antimicrobials and presence of virulence/stress response genes in Campylobacter isolates from patients with severe diarrhoea.

Ghunaim H, Behnke JM, Aigha I, Sharma A, Doiphode SH, Deshmukh A, Abu-Madi MM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Prevalence of enteric bacteria in the stools of outpatients reporting to the MHC with severe diarrhoea in the period 2005–2013.The sample sizes for 2005–2013 were 2220, 1916, 2460, 2394, 2528, 2726, 3347, 4373 and 4176, respectively.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363897&req=5

pone.0119268.g001: Prevalence of enteric bacteria in the stools of outpatients reporting to the MHC with severe diarrhoea in the period 2005–2013.The sample sizes for 2005–2013 were 2220, 1916, 2460, 2394, 2528, 2726, 3347, 4373 and 4176, respectively.
Mentions: Fig. 1 shows the annual prevalence of pathogenic enteric bacteria in the period 2005 to 2013, in 26,140 subjects whose stools were examined because they had severe and bloody diarrhoea. The prevalence of Salmonella was the highest across the whole period (8.6% [8.28–8.96]) but there was significant variation between years (YEAR*INFECTION, χ28 = 161.2, P< 0.001). Peak prevalence was recorded in 2006 and this was followed by a consistent decline over the following years. E. coli (2.8% [2.64–3.04]), Shigella (2.8% [1.84–2.18]) and Campylobacter (1.9% [1.73–2.06]) all showed lower but similar prevalence over the whole of this period, again with some variation between years, which in all three cases was significant (χ28 = 94.9, 139.1 and 97.5, respectively and P<0.001 in all cases). As with Salmonella, there was a gradual decline in cases in the later years of the period (Fig. 1). Across the whole period, 26 cases of Aeromonas, 7 of Vibrio, and 3 of Yersinia were also detected. A detailed breakdown of the number of cases of Aeromonas, Campylobacter, E. coli, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio and Yersinia positive cases is provided as supplementary information (See S1 Table).

Bottom Line: There was no host sex- or age-dependence among isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and no significant variation was found with the region of origin of the patients.Host sex-, age- and region of origin-dependent variations in prevalence were found for some of these factors.These results are discussed and their implications are highlighted.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Qatar University, P.O. Box 2713, Doha, Qatar.

ABSTRACT
Campylobacter infections are a major cause of diarrhoea world-wide and two of the antimicrobials used for their control (erythromycin and ciprofloxacin) have been losing efficacy in recent years. In a sample of 174 genotyped isolates from the stools of patients with severe diarrhoea in Qatar, collected between 2005 and 2012, 63.2% showed resistance to ciprofloxacin, 8.6% to erythromycin, 0.57% to chloramphenicol and all were sensitive to gentamycin. While 33.9% of isolates were sensitive to all four antimicrobials, 59.8% were resistant to at least one, 6.3% were resistant to two and none showed resistance to three antimicrobials. There was no host sex- or age-dependence among isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin and no significant variation was found with the region of origin of the patients. All isolates were screened for the presence of 3 virulence factors (ciaB, cadF and cdtB) and two stress-response factors (htrB and clpP), all of which were present in more than 50% of the isolates. Host sex-, age- and region of origin-dependent variations in prevalence were found for some of these factors. Data analysis for the combination of virulence factors and their effect on antimicrobial resistance indicated that the prevalence of resistance to both erythromycin and ciprofloxacin was higher in isolates harbouring ciaB but not clpP. Prevalence of resistance to ciprofloxacin was similar in clpP positive and negative isolates also possessing htrB, while for htrB-negative isolates prevalence was higher in the absence of clpP. These results are discussed and their implications are highlighted.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus