Limits...
Bladder recovery by stem cell based cell therapy in the bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Kim JH, Shim SR, Doo SW, Yang WJ, Yoo BW, Kim JM, Ko YM, Song ES, Lim IS, Lee HJ, Song YS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI.Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%).Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Soonchunyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) can become problematic and severely impair the quality of life. Preclinical studies of spinal cord injury have largely focused on the recovery of limb function while neglecting to investigate bladder recovery.

Objective: The present study was performed to investigate and review the effect of stem cell-based cell therapy on bladder recovery in SCI.

Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of urodynamic findings of experimental trials that included studies of stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI. Relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (January 1990 - December 2012). Final inclusion was determined by a urodynamic study involving detailed numerical values. Urodynamic parameters for analysis included voiding pressure, residual urine, bladder capacity and non-voiding contraction (NVC). Meta-analysis of the data, including findings from urodynamic studies, was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method.

Results: A total of eight studies were included with a sample size of 224 subjects. The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI. After a stem cell-based cell therapy, voiding pressure (-6.35, p <0.00001, I2 = 77%), NVC (-3.58, p <0.00001, I2 = 82%), residual urine (-024, p = 0.004, I2 = 95%) showed overall significant improvement. Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%).

Conclusion: After stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI, partial bladder recovery including improvement of voiding pressure, NVC, and residual urine was demonstrated. Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Risk of bias summary.A review of the author’s judgments about each risk of bias item for each included study. “+”is “low risk”, “-“is “high risk”, “?” is “unclear”.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363872&req=5

pone.0113491.g002: Risk of bias summary.A review of the author’s judgments about each risk of bias item for each included study. “+”is “low risk”, “-“is “high risk”, “?” is “unclear”.

Mentions: These studies did not include the sham model. Overall, the risk of bias was considered to be low (Fig. 2).


Bladder recovery by stem cell based cell therapy in the bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Kim JH, Shim SR, Doo SW, Yang WJ, Yoo BW, Kim JM, Ko YM, Song ES, Lim IS, Lee HJ, Song YS - PLoS ONE (2015)

Risk of bias summary.A review of the author’s judgments about each risk of bias item for each included study. “+”is “low risk”, “-“is “high risk”, “?” is “unclear”.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363872&req=5

pone.0113491.g002: Risk of bias summary.A review of the author’s judgments about each risk of bias item for each included study. “+”is “low risk”, “-“is “high risk”, “?” is “unclear”.
Mentions: These studies did not include the sham model. Overall, the risk of bias was considered to be low (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI.Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%).Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, Soonchunyang University Hospital, Soonchunhyang University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Bladder dysfunction induced by spinal cord injury (SCI) can become problematic and severely impair the quality of life. Preclinical studies of spinal cord injury have largely focused on the recovery of limb function while neglecting to investigate bladder recovery.

Objective: The present study was performed to investigate and review the effect of stem cell-based cell therapy on bladder recovery in SCI.

Methods: We conducted a meta-analysis of urodynamic findings of experimental trials that included studies of stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI. Relevant studies were searched using MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library (January 1990 - December 2012). Final inclusion was determined by a urodynamic study involving detailed numerical values. Urodynamic parameters for analysis included voiding pressure, residual urine, bladder capacity and non-voiding contraction (NVC). Meta-analysis of the data, including findings from urodynamic studies, was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method.

Results: A total of eight studies were included with a sample size of 224 subjects. The studies were divided into different subgroups by different models of SCI. After a stem cell-based cell therapy, voiding pressure (-6.35, p <0.00001, I2 = 77%), NVC (-3.58, p <0.00001, I2 = 82%), residual urine (-024, p = 0.004, I2 = 95%) showed overall significant improvement. Bladder capacity showed improvement after treatment only in the transection type (-0.23, p = 0.0002, I2 = 0%).

Conclusion: After stem cell-based cell therapy in SCI, partial bladder recovery including improvement of voiding pressure, NVC, and residual urine was demonstrated. Additional studies are needed to confirm the detailed mechanism and to obtain an ideal treatment strategy for bladder recovery.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus