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Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in "Overweight" Subjects.

von Deneen KM, Qin W, Liu P, Dong M, Chen P, Xie H, Zhang Y, Gold MS, Liu Y, Tian J - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Bottom Line: There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups.No correlation was found for min SHAM.This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071, China ; Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, 1149 S. Newell Dr. L4-100K, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

ABSTRACT
This functional connectivity study depicts how acupoints ST 36 and SP 9 and their sham acupoints acutely act on blood glucose (GLU), core body temperature (CBT), hunger, and sensations pertaining to needling (De-qi) via the limbic system and dopamine (DA) to affect various brain areas in fasting, adult, and "overweight" Chinese males using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis utilized the amygdala (AMY) and hypothalamus (HYP) as regions of interest (ROIs) in the discrete cosine transform and seed correlation analysis methods. There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups. Correlation results showed that increased HYP-hippocampus FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT; increased HYP-putamen-insula FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU; and increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. Decreased HYP-thalamus FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was possibly associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. No correlation was found for min SHAM. This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in functional connectivity (FC) with the hippocampus (HIPP) after acupunture minus before acupuncture (ACU) in relation to delta temperature correlation scores after ACU minus before ACU. Increased hypothalamus-hippocampus functional connectivity (HYP–HIPP FC) after acupuncture (after ACU) was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in core body temperature suggesting that increased dopamine modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity (r = 0.66; P = 0.03).
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fig4: Changes in functional connectivity (FC) with the hippocampus (HIPP) after acupunture minus before acupuncture (ACU) in relation to delta temperature correlation scores after ACU minus before ACU. Increased hypothalamus-hippocampus functional connectivity (HYP–HIPP FC) after acupuncture (after ACU) was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in core body temperature suggesting that increased dopamine modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity (r = 0.66; P = 0.03).

Mentions: For the correlation analysis, normalized individual response to ACU and min SHAM was calculated by subtracting the value in the prestimulation rest from the value during active stimulation. To investigate the relationship between these metrics and imaging results (significant after ACU minus before ACU change in mean z-statistic within ROIs from the paired t-test above), Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated at a significance level of P < 0.05 (a lower P value could not be used to detect any regions). No correlation was found in min SHAM. ACU increased the z-scores of the differences in certain brain regions. A positive correlation coefficient meant that as the value of one variable increased, the value of the other variable increased; as one decreased the other decreased. A negative correlation coefficient indicated that as one variable increased, the other decreased and vice versa. Using our FC results, we used Pearson correlation to suggest causal relationships. As a result, increased HYP–HIPP FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 4. Increased HYP-PUT-INS FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU suggesting that increased dopamine (DA) modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figures 5 and 6. Increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was conceivably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 7. Decreased HYP-THALAMUS FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was perhaps associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 8. All we can deduce is that the two variables occurred together, so that changes in one were accompanied by systematic changes in the other. Causal inferences were made based on underlying theories and knowledge.


Connectivity Study of the Neuromechanism of Acute Acupuncture Needling during fMRI in "Overweight" Subjects.

von Deneen KM, Qin W, Liu P, Dong M, Chen P, Xie H, Zhang Y, Gold MS, Liu Y, Tian J - Evid Based Complement Alternat Med (2015)

Changes in functional connectivity (FC) with the hippocampus (HIPP) after acupunture minus before acupuncture (ACU) in relation to delta temperature correlation scores after ACU minus before ACU. Increased hypothalamus-hippocampus functional connectivity (HYP–HIPP FC) after acupuncture (after ACU) was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in core body temperature suggesting that increased dopamine modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity (r = 0.66; P = 0.03).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363637&req=5

fig4: Changes in functional connectivity (FC) with the hippocampus (HIPP) after acupunture minus before acupuncture (ACU) in relation to delta temperature correlation scores after ACU minus before ACU. Increased hypothalamus-hippocampus functional connectivity (HYP–HIPP FC) after acupuncture (after ACU) was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in core body temperature suggesting that increased dopamine modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity (r = 0.66; P = 0.03).
Mentions: For the correlation analysis, normalized individual response to ACU and min SHAM was calculated by subtracting the value in the prestimulation rest from the value during active stimulation. To investigate the relationship between these metrics and imaging results (significant after ACU minus before ACU change in mean z-statistic within ROIs from the paired t-test above), Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated at a significance level of P < 0.05 (a lower P value could not be used to detect any regions). No correlation was found in min SHAM. ACU increased the z-scores of the differences in certain brain regions. A positive correlation coefficient meant that as the value of one variable increased, the value of the other variable increased; as one decreased the other decreased. A negative correlation coefficient indicated that as one variable increased, the other decreased and vice versa. Using our FC results, we used Pearson correlation to suggest causal relationships. As a result, increased HYP–HIPP FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 4. Increased HYP-PUT-INS FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU suggesting that increased dopamine (DA) modulation during ACU was possibly associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figures 5 and 6. Increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was conceivably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 7. Decreased HYP-THALAMUS FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was perhaps associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity, as shown in Figure 8. All we can deduce is that the two variables occurred together, so that changes in one were accompanied by systematic changes in the other. Causal inferences were made based on underlying theories and knowledge.

Bottom Line: There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups.No correlation was found for min SHAM.This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Life Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi'an 710071, China ; Department of Psychiatry & McKnight Brain Institute, University of Florida, 1149 S. Newell Dr. L4-100K, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA.

ABSTRACT
This functional connectivity study depicts how acupoints ST 36 and SP 9 and their sham acupoints acutely act on blood glucose (GLU), core body temperature (CBT), hunger, and sensations pertaining to needling (De-qi) via the limbic system and dopamine (DA) to affect various brain areas in fasting, adult, and "overweight" Chinese males using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Functional connectivity (FC) analysis utilized the amygdala (AMY) and hypothalamus (HYP) as regions of interest (ROIs) in the discrete cosine transform and seed correlation analysis methods. There was a significant difference in the spatial patterns of the distinct brain regions between groups. Correlation results showed that increased HYP-hippocampus FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in CBT; increased HYP-putamen-insula FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in GLU; and increased HYP-anterior cingulate cortex FC after ACU was positively correlated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was probably associated with increased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. Decreased HYP-thalamus FC after ACU was negatively correlated or anticorrelated with ACU-induced change in HUNGER suggesting that increased DA modulation during ACU was possibly associated with decreased poststimulation limbic system and spinothalamic tract connectivity. No correlation was found for min SHAM. This was an important study in addressing acute acupuncture effects and neural pathways involving physiology and appetite regulation in overweight individuals.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus