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Temporal variations in soil moisture for three typical vegetation types in inner Mongolia, northern China.

Zheng H, Gao J, Teng Y, Feng C, Tian M - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: QM had the highest mean soil moisture content (21.13%) during the monitoring period, followed by UG (16.52%) and AL (14.55%); and the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 9.6-12.5%), followed by UG (CV 10.9-18.7%) and AL (CV 13.9-21.0%).QM soil had a higher nutrient content and higher soil porosities, which were likely responsible for the higher ability of this cover to retain soil water.The relatively smaller QM trees were able to maintain soil moisture better in the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China; Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 210042, China.

ABSTRACT
Drought and shortages of soil water are becoming extremely severe due to global climate change. A better understanding of the relationship between vegetation type and soil-moisture conditions is crucial for conserving soil water in forests and for maintaining a favorable hydrological balance in semiarid areas, such as the Saihanwula National Nature Reserve in Inner Mongolia, China. We investigated the temporal dynamics of soil moisture in this reserve to a depth of 40 cm under three types of vegetation during a period of rainwater recharge. Rainwater from most rainfalls recharged the soil water poorly below 40 cm, and the rainfall threshold for increasing the moisture content of surface soil for the three vegetations was in the order: artificial Larix spp. (AL) > Quercus mongolica (QM) > unused grassland (UG). QM had the highest mean soil moisture content (21.13%) during the monitoring period, followed by UG (16.52%) and AL (14.55%); and the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 9.6-12.5%), followed by UG (CV 10.9-18.7%) and AL (CV 13.9-21.0%). QM soil had a higher nutrient content and higher soil porosities, which were likely responsible for the higher ability of this cover to retain soil water. The relatively smaller QM trees were able to maintain soil moisture better in the study area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The onset of peak soil-moisture content (SMC) at each soil depth for the three vegetation types for individual rains.Notes: AL, artificial Larix spp.; QM, Quercus mongolica; UG, unused grassland.
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pone.0118964.g003: The onset of peak soil-moisture content (SMC) at each soil depth for the three vegetation types for individual rains.Notes: AL, artificial Larix spp.; QM, Quercus mongolica; UG, unused grassland.

Mentions: Changes in SMC lagged following a rain. The time of onset of peak SMC at each soil depth for the three vegetation types is shown in Fig. 3. The order of onset of peak SMC at each depth was UG > QM > AL. The lag was longer as the amount and intensity of rain decreased. The shortest times to the onset of peak SMC for the six heaviest rainfalls were 2.63, 6.67, and 6.55 h in the top soil layer and 10.07, 12.50, and 20.23 h at the 30 cm depth for UG, QM, and AL, respectively. The slowest times to the onset of peak SMC at the 30 cm depth were 26.9, 28.25, and 30.75 h for UG, QM, and AL, respectively, after which the peak was maintained or repeated over a period of time, and then SMC gradually declined.


Temporal variations in soil moisture for three typical vegetation types in inner Mongolia, northern China.

Zheng H, Gao J, Teng Y, Feng C, Tian M - PLoS ONE (2015)

The onset of peak soil-moisture content (SMC) at each soil depth for the three vegetation types for individual rains.Notes: AL, artificial Larix spp.; QM, Quercus mongolica; UG, unused grassland.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363572&req=5

pone.0118964.g003: The onset of peak soil-moisture content (SMC) at each soil depth for the three vegetation types for individual rains.Notes: AL, artificial Larix spp.; QM, Quercus mongolica; UG, unused grassland.
Mentions: Changes in SMC lagged following a rain. The time of onset of peak SMC at each soil depth for the three vegetation types is shown in Fig. 3. The order of onset of peak SMC at each depth was UG > QM > AL. The lag was longer as the amount and intensity of rain decreased. The shortest times to the onset of peak SMC for the six heaviest rainfalls were 2.63, 6.67, and 6.55 h in the top soil layer and 10.07, 12.50, and 20.23 h at the 30 cm depth for UG, QM, and AL, respectively. The slowest times to the onset of peak SMC at the 30 cm depth were 26.9, 28.25, and 30.75 h for UG, QM, and AL, respectively, after which the peak was maintained or repeated over a period of time, and then SMC gradually declined.

Bottom Line: QM had the highest mean soil moisture content (21.13%) during the monitoring period, followed by UG (16.52%) and AL (14.55%); and the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 9.6-12.5%), followed by UG (CV 10.9-18.7%) and AL (CV 13.9-21.0%).QM soil had a higher nutrient content and higher soil porosities, which were likely responsible for the higher ability of this cover to retain soil water.The relatively smaller QM trees were able to maintain soil moisture better in the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Water Sciences, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, 100875, China; Nanjing Institute of Environmental Sciences, Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, 210042, China.

ABSTRACT
Drought and shortages of soil water are becoming extremely severe due to global climate change. A better understanding of the relationship between vegetation type and soil-moisture conditions is crucial for conserving soil water in forests and for maintaining a favorable hydrological balance in semiarid areas, such as the Saihanwula National Nature Reserve in Inner Mongolia, China. We investigated the temporal dynamics of soil moisture in this reserve to a depth of 40 cm under three types of vegetation during a period of rainwater recharge. Rainwater from most rainfalls recharged the soil water poorly below 40 cm, and the rainfall threshold for increasing the moisture content of surface soil for the three vegetations was in the order: artificial Larix spp. (AL) > Quercus mongolica (QM) > unused grassland (UG). QM had the highest mean soil moisture content (21.13%) during the monitoring period, followed by UG (16.52%) and AL (14.55%); and the lowest coefficient of variation (CV 9.6-12.5%), followed by UG (CV 10.9-18.7%) and AL (CV 13.9-21.0%). QM soil had a higher nutrient content and higher soil porosities, which were likely responsible for the higher ability of this cover to retain soil water. The relatively smaller QM trees were able to maintain soil moisture better in the study area.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus