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Different visual preference patterns in response to simple and complex dynamic social stimuli in preschool-aged children with autism spectrum disorders.

Shi L, Zhou Y, Ou J, Gong J, Wang S, Cui X, Lyu H, Zhao J, Luo X - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: In the present study, eye-tracking of two different paired presentations of DSIs and DGIs was monitored in a group of 13 children aged 4 to 6 years with ASD and 20 chronologically age-matched typically developing children (TDC).The results indicated that compared with the control group, children with ASD attended significantly less to DSIs showing two or more children playing than to similar DSIs showing a single child.Visual attention preference in 4- to 6-year-old children with ASDs, therefore, appears to be modulated by the type of visual stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mental Health Institute of The Second Xiangya Hospital and Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, The Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Eye-tracking studies in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have shown a visual attention preference for geometric patterns when viewing paired dynamic social images (DSIs) and dynamic geometric images (DGIs). In the present study, eye-tracking of two different paired presentations of DSIs and DGIs was monitored in a group of 13 children aged 4 to 6 years with ASD and 20 chronologically age-matched typically developing children (TDC). The results indicated that compared with the control group, children with ASD attended significantly less to DSIs showing two or more children playing than to similar DSIs showing a single child. Visual attention preference in 4- to 6-year-old children with ASDs, therefore, appears to be modulated by the type of visual stimuli.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

iMaps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group and the TDC group in Part II.ASD (a): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group; TDC (b): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the TDC group; Warm colors denote a greater number of fixations and cold colors denote fewer fixations. ASD vs. TDC (c): Z-score difference map prepared by subtracting the number of fixations in the TDC group from that in the ASD group. Red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the TDC group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the ASD group.
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pone.0122280.g008: iMaps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group and the TDC group in Part II.ASD (a): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group; TDC (b): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the TDC group; Warm colors denote a greater number of fixations and cold colors denote fewer fixations. ASD vs. TDC (c): Z-score difference map prepared by subtracting the number of fixations in the TDC group from that in the ASD group. Red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the TDC group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the ASD group.

Mentions: Using iMap, we compared the duration and number of fixations in the ASD and TDC groups. The Z-score maps of fixation duration and number of fixations in Part I are presented in Figs. 5 and 6. The Z-score maps of fixation duration and number of fixations in Part II are presented in Figs. 7 and 8. Areas with significantly greater (or lesser) number of fixations or fixation duration between the two groups were plotted with white contour lines (all P < 0.05). In the difference maps, red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more time (greater number of fixations) in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the control group spent more time (greater number of fixations) in these areas than did the ASD group.


Different visual preference patterns in response to simple and complex dynamic social stimuli in preschool-aged children with autism spectrum disorders.

Shi L, Zhou Y, Ou J, Gong J, Wang S, Cui X, Lyu H, Zhao J, Luo X - PLoS ONE (2015)

iMaps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group and the TDC group in Part II.ASD (a): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group; TDC (b): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the TDC group; Warm colors denote a greater number of fixations and cold colors denote fewer fixations. ASD vs. TDC (c): Z-score difference map prepared by subtracting the number of fixations in the TDC group from that in the ASD group. Red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the TDC group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the ASD group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363528&req=5

pone.0122280.g008: iMaps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group and the TDC group in Part II.ASD (a): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the ASD group; TDC (b): Z-score maps showing the distribution of the number of fixations in the TDC group; Warm colors denote a greater number of fixations and cold colors denote fewer fixations. ASD vs. TDC (c): Z-score difference map prepared by subtracting the number of fixations in the TDC group from that in the ASD group. Red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the TDC group spent more fixation number in these areas than did the ASD group.
Mentions: Using iMap, we compared the duration and number of fixations in the ASD and TDC groups. The Z-score maps of fixation duration and number of fixations in Part I are presented in Figs. 5 and 6. The Z-score maps of fixation duration and number of fixations in Part II are presented in Figs. 7 and 8. Areas with significantly greater (or lesser) number of fixations or fixation duration between the two groups were plotted with white contour lines (all P < 0.05). In the difference maps, red areas indicate positive results; the ASD group spent more time (greater number of fixations) in these areas than did the TDC group. Blue areas represent negative results; the control group spent more time (greater number of fixations) in these areas than did the ASD group.

Bottom Line: In the present study, eye-tracking of two different paired presentations of DSIs and DGIs was monitored in a group of 13 children aged 4 to 6 years with ASD and 20 chronologically age-matched typically developing children (TDC).The results indicated that compared with the control group, children with ASD attended significantly less to DSIs showing two or more children playing than to similar DSIs showing a single child.Visual attention preference in 4- to 6-year-old children with ASDs, therefore, appears to be modulated by the type of visual stimuli.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mental Health Institute of The Second Xiangya Hospital and Key Laboratory of Psychiatry and Mental Health of Hunan Province, The Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Eye-tracking studies in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have shown a visual attention preference for geometric patterns when viewing paired dynamic social images (DSIs) and dynamic geometric images (DGIs). In the present study, eye-tracking of two different paired presentations of DSIs and DGIs was monitored in a group of 13 children aged 4 to 6 years with ASD and 20 chronologically age-matched typically developing children (TDC). The results indicated that compared with the control group, children with ASD attended significantly less to DSIs showing two or more children playing than to similar DSIs showing a single child. Visual attention preference in 4- to 6-year-old children with ASDs, therefore, appears to be modulated by the type of visual stimuli.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus