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Dual-Energy CT: What the Neuroradiologist Should Know.

Postma AA, Das M, Stadler AA, Wildberger JE - Curr Radiol Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Because of the different attenuations of tissues at different energy levels, dual-energy CT offers tissue differentiation and characterization, reduction of artifacts, and remodeling of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), hereby creating new opportunities and insights in CT imaging.Differentiation of iodine and hemorrhage is used in high-density lesions, after intra-arterial recanalization in stroke patients or after administration of contrast media.Detection of underlying (vascular and non-vascular) pathology and spot sign can be used in patients presenting with (acute) intracranial hemorrhage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Because of the different attenuations of tissues at different energy levels, dual-energy CT offers tissue differentiation and characterization, reduction of artifacts, and remodeling of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), hereby creating new opportunities and insights in CT imaging. The applications for dual-energy imaging in neuroradiology are various and still expanding. Automated bone removal is used in CT angiography and CT venography of the intracranial vessels. Monoenergetic reconstructions can be used in patients with or without metal implants in the brain and spine to reduce artifacts, improve CNR and SNR, or to improve iodine conspicuity. Differentiation of iodine and hemorrhage is used in high-density lesions, after intra-arterial recanalization in stroke patients or after administration of contrast media. Detection of underlying (vascular and non-vascular) pathology and spot sign can be used in patients presenting with (acute) intracranial hemorrhage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Monoenergetic images (40–150 keV) reconstructed from DECTA in a patient with right temporal hemorrhage, same as Fig. 5. An increase in iodine density at lower energies is shown. At higher energies, the hemorrhage is better appreciated, whereas the iodine attenuation decreases. CNR is higher at lower energies, while SNR increases with higher energies
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Fig6: Monoenergetic images (40–150 keV) reconstructed from DECTA in a patient with right temporal hemorrhage, same as Fig. 5. An increase in iodine density at lower energies is shown. At higher energies, the hemorrhage is better appreciated, whereas the iodine attenuation decreases. CNR is higher at lower energies, while SNR increases with higher energies

Mentions: Standard CT at 120 kVp exhibits similar Hounsfield densities for iodine and hemorrhage. But at lower kV, as iodine is closer to the K-edge, attenuation is increased compared to hemorrhage and iodine shows higher densities (Fig. 6). DECT is able to characterize iodine and to calculate VNC and IOM. These are useful in various neuroradiological indications.Fig. 6


Dual-Energy CT: What the Neuroradiologist Should Know.

Postma AA, Das M, Stadler AA, Wildberger JE - Curr Radiol Rep (2015)

Monoenergetic images (40–150 keV) reconstructed from DECTA in a patient with right temporal hemorrhage, same as Fig. 5. An increase in iodine density at lower energies is shown. At higher energies, the hemorrhage is better appreciated, whereas the iodine attenuation decreases. CNR is higher at lower energies, while SNR increases with higher energies
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363523&req=5

Fig6: Monoenergetic images (40–150 keV) reconstructed from DECTA in a patient with right temporal hemorrhage, same as Fig. 5. An increase in iodine density at lower energies is shown. At higher energies, the hemorrhage is better appreciated, whereas the iodine attenuation decreases. CNR is higher at lower energies, while SNR increases with higher energies
Mentions: Standard CT at 120 kVp exhibits similar Hounsfield densities for iodine and hemorrhage. But at lower kV, as iodine is closer to the K-edge, attenuation is increased compared to hemorrhage and iodine shows higher densities (Fig. 6). DECT is able to characterize iodine and to calculate VNC and IOM. These are useful in various neuroradiological indications.Fig. 6

Bottom Line: Because of the different attenuations of tissues at different energy levels, dual-energy CT offers tissue differentiation and characterization, reduction of artifacts, and remodeling of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), hereby creating new opportunities and insights in CT imaging.Differentiation of iodine and hemorrhage is used in high-density lesions, after intra-arterial recanalization in stroke patients or after administration of contrast media.Detection of underlying (vascular and non-vascular) pathology and spot sign can be used in patients presenting with (acute) intracranial hemorrhage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Because of the different attenuations of tissues at different energy levels, dual-energy CT offers tissue differentiation and characterization, reduction of artifacts, and remodeling of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), hereby creating new opportunities and insights in CT imaging. The applications for dual-energy imaging in neuroradiology are various and still expanding. Automated bone removal is used in CT angiography and CT venography of the intracranial vessels. Monoenergetic reconstructions can be used in patients with or without metal implants in the brain and spine to reduce artifacts, improve CNR and SNR, or to improve iodine conspicuity. Differentiation of iodine and hemorrhage is used in high-density lesions, after intra-arterial recanalization in stroke patients or after administration of contrast media. Detection of underlying (vascular and non-vascular) pathology and spot sign can be used in patients presenting with (acute) intracranial hemorrhage.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus