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The behavioural ecology of climbing plants.

Gianoli E - AoB Plants (2015)

Bottom Line: I discuss functional responses of vines to the interplay between herbivory and support availability under different abiotic environments, illustrating with one study case how results comply with a theoretical framework of behavioural ecology originally conceived for animals.I conclude stressing that climbing plants are suitable study subjects for the application of behavioural-ecological theory.In particular, cost-benefit analysis of climbing plant behaviour should be helpful to infer the selective pressures that have operated to shape current climber ecological communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología, Universidad de La Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile Departamento de Botánica, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Chile egianoli@userena.cl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Components of support value (∼ prey profitability) for climbing plants may show a trade-off because of the intrinsic association between tree diameter and tree height (dashed line). Thin trees are easy to climb (low handling time) but result in short heights (low energy value), while the opposite occurs for thick trees. Highest and lowest support values are shown in blue and red, respectively.
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PLV013F3: Components of support value (∼ prey profitability) for climbing plants may show a trade-off because of the intrinsic association between tree diameter and tree height (dashed line). Thin trees are easy to climb (low handling time) but result in short heights (low energy value), while the opposite occurs for thick trees. Highest and lowest support values are shown in blue and red, respectively.

Mentions: Interestingly, components of support value may trade-off. Thus, thin supports may be easy to climb but result in a short final height for the vine (low handling time, low energy value), while thick supports may be hard to climb but result in a tall final height (high handling time, high energy value) (Fig. 3). Exceptions to this could be observed in those cases where vines ascend by climbing older vines (i.e. relatively thin and tall supports) (see Putz 1984). Trade-offs among components of foraging, particularly among those with a known—or assumed—relationship with fitness (fitness currency, Pyke 1984), are major constraints for the evolution of adaptive foraging behaviour (Krebs and Davies 1993). A more complex scenario may arise considering that fitness currencies may vary with the climbing mechanism and/or life history of vines. Thus, the premise that the energy value of the support depends on light harvest after attaining maximum height on it assumes that the plant aims at maximizing growth and carbon gain. However, field studies have shown that some vine species prioritize growth rate and carbon gain, while other species display traits enhancing survival in low light (Gilbert et al. 2006; Valladares et al. 2011; Gianoli et al. 2012). Moreover, the species' climbing mechanism influences its photosynthetic acclimation and abundance in contrasting light environments (Carter and Teramura 1988; Teramura et al. 1991) such as those found along the vertical light gradient in the forest.Figure 3.


The behavioural ecology of climbing plants.

Gianoli E - AoB Plants (2015)

Components of support value (∼ prey profitability) for climbing plants may show a trade-off because of the intrinsic association between tree diameter and tree height (dashed line). Thin trees are easy to climb (low handling time) but result in short heights (low energy value), while the opposite occurs for thick trees. Highest and lowest support values are shown in blue and red, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363473&req=5

PLV013F3: Components of support value (∼ prey profitability) for climbing plants may show a trade-off because of the intrinsic association between tree diameter and tree height (dashed line). Thin trees are easy to climb (low handling time) but result in short heights (low energy value), while the opposite occurs for thick trees. Highest and lowest support values are shown in blue and red, respectively.
Mentions: Interestingly, components of support value may trade-off. Thus, thin supports may be easy to climb but result in a short final height for the vine (low handling time, low energy value), while thick supports may be hard to climb but result in a tall final height (high handling time, high energy value) (Fig. 3). Exceptions to this could be observed in those cases where vines ascend by climbing older vines (i.e. relatively thin and tall supports) (see Putz 1984). Trade-offs among components of foraging, particularly among those with a known—or assumed—relationship with fitness (fitness currency, Pyke 1984), are major constraints for the evolution of adaptive foraging behaviour (Krebs and Davies 1993). A more complex scenario may arise considering that fitness currencies may vary with the climbing mechanism and/or life history of vines. Thus, the premise that the energy value of the support depends on light harvest after attaining maximum height on it assumes that the plant aims at maximizing growth and carbon gain. However, field studies have shown that some vine species prioritize growth rate and carbon gain, while other species display traits enhancing survival in low light (Gilbert et al. 2006; Valladares et al. 2011; Gianoli et al. 2012). Moreover, the species' climbing mechanism influences its photosynthetic acclimation and abundance in contrasting light environments (Carter and Teramura 1988; Teramura et al. 1991) such as those found along the vertical light gradient in the forest.Figure 3.

Bottom Line: I discuss functional responses of vines to the interplay between herbivory and support availability under different abiotic environments, illustrating with one study case how results comply with a theoretical framework of behavioural ecology originally conceived for animals.I conclude stressing that climbing plants are suitable study subjects for the application of behavioural-ecological theory.In particular, cost-benefit analysis of climbing plant behaviour should be helpful to infer the selective pressures that have operated to shape current climber ecological communities.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Biología, Universidad de La Serena, Casilla 554, La Serena, Chile Departamento de Botánica, Universidad de Concepción, Casilla 160-C, Concepción, Chile egianoli@userena.cl.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus