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Development of a touch-screen-based paradigm for assessing working memory in the mouse.

Kwak C, Lim CS, Kaang BK - Exp Neurobiol (2014)

Bottom Line: Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design).In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay.This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design). However, there is currently no available testing paradigm utilizing touch-screen systems that can assess working memory in the mouse. In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay. Consistent with previous studies, this study showed that mice could not only learn the rule in the delayed matched to position (DMTP), but also could retain a transitory memory of the sample position during delay. This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

No MeSH data available.


Cue-response structure. (A) Schematic drawings of experimental design. Central cues used in this experiment were provided by manufacturer (Campden Instruments Ltd, UK). C and W indicate 'correct' and 'wrong', respectively. (B) When mice were guided by a cue to make the correct choice, they performed poorly in associating visual cue and correct choice location. Percentage of correct choice in the first session and last session were 61.3±4.3% and 59.5±3.4%, respectively. Error bars indicate SEM. Eight mice used in this experiment.
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Figure 2: Cue-response structure. (A) Schematic drawings of experimental design. Central cues used in this experiment were provided by manufacturer (Campden Instruments Ltd, UK). C and W indicate 'correct' and 'wrong', respectively. (B) When mice were guided by a cue to make the correct choice, they performed poorly in associating visual cue and correct choice location. Percentage of correct choice in the first session and last session were 61.3±4.3% and 59.5±3.4%, respectively. Error bars indicate SEM. Eight mice used in this experiment.

Mentions: To test working memory in a touch-screen system, we first tested whether mice can learn a reference memory in which they choose between locations on the left or right, following presentation of a visual cue presented in the center (Fig. 2). This task also has been used to test rodent's visuo-motor response [6]. On a given trial, to receive a reward, the mouse must touch a visual cue presented in the center location on the screen, and then choose either the left or right location of subsequent visual choice stimuli, in accordance with the visual cues (Fig. 2A) that have different colors and shapes. When choice moments were given 1 second after touching the center cue, however, mice performed poorly this task (Fig. 2B). Their failure to learn the reference rule indicates that using the cue-delay-response method in the touch-screen paradigm is not an appropriate way to test working memory in mice.


Development of a touch-screen-based paradigm for assessing working memory in the mouse.

Kwak C, Lim CS, Kaang BK - Exp Neurobiol (2014)

Cue-response structure. (A) Schematic drawings of experimental design. Central cues used in this experiment were provided by manufacturer (Campden Instruments Ltd, UK). C and W indicate 'correct' and 'wrong', respectively. (B) When mice were guided by a cue to make the correct choice, they performed poorly in associating visual cue and correct choice location. Percentage of correct choice in the first session and last session were 61.3±4.3% and 59.5±3.4%, respectively. Error bars indicate SEM. Eight mice used in this experiment.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363337&req=5

Figure 2: Cue-response structure. (A) Schematic drawings of experimental design. Central cues used in this experiment were provided by manufacturer (Campden Instruments Ltd, UK). C and W indicate 'correct' and 'wrong', respectively. (B) When mice were guided by a cue to make the correct choice, they performed poorly in associating visual cue and correct choice location. Percentage of correct choice in the first session and last session were 61.3±4.3% and 59.5±3.4%, respectively. Error bars indicate SEM. Eight mice used in this experiment.
Mentions: To test working memory in a touch-screen system, we first tested whether mice can learn a reference memory in which they choose between locations on the left or right, following presentation of a visual cue presented in the center (Fig. 2). This task also has been used to test rodent's visuo-motor response [6]. On a given trial, to receive a reward, the mouse must touch a visual cue presented in the center location on the screen, and then choose either the left or right location of subsequent visual choice stimuli, in accordance with the visual cues (Fig. 2A) that have different colors and shapes. When choice moments were given 1 second after touching the center cue, however, mice performed poorly this task (Fig. 2B). Their failure to learn the reference rule indicates that using the cue-delay-response method in the touch-screen paradigm is not an appropriate way to test working memory in mice.

Bottom Line: Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design).In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay.This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Assessing the working memory of the rodent by using a touch-screen system has several advantages (e.g., allowing highly accurate data collection and flexibility in memory task design). However, there is currently no available testing paradigm utilizing touch-screen systems that can assess working memory in the mouse. In this study, we developed a touch-screen testing paradigm in which mice were trained to choose a location that is matched to a sample location after a time delay. Consistent with previous studies, this study showed that mice could not only learn the rule in the delayed matched to position (DMTP), but also could retain a transitory memory of the sample position during delay. This indicates that a touch-screen system can provide a DMTP testing platform to assess working memory in the mouse.

No MeSH data available.