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4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced growth hormone response in sedentary men.

Sasaki H, Morishima T, Hasegawa Y, Mori A, Ijichi T, Kurihara T, Goto K - Springerplus (2014)

Bottom Line: However, the responses did not change after training period in either group.Furthermore, the training did not significantly affect intramyocellular or intrahepatic lipid content in either group.The present study indicates that 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced GH responses, whole body fat mass or intramyocellular and intrahepatic lipid content in sedentary males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga, Japan.

ABSTRACT
This study determined the effects of high-intensity interval training on the exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) responses, whole body and regional fat content. Twenty-four sedentary males were randomized to either a high-intensity interval training (HIT) group or a low-intensity continuous training (LT) group. The HIT group performed intermittent exercises at 85% of [Formula: see text], whereas the LT group performed continuous exercise for 22 min at 45% of [Formula: see text]. Before and after 4 weeks of training, hormonal and metabolic responses to acute exercise were determined. Acute exercise significantly increased GH concentrations in both groups (p < 0.05). However, the responses did not change after training period in either group. Furthermore, the training did not significantly affect intramyocellular or intrahepatic lipid content in either group. The present study indicates that 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced GH responses, whole body fat mass or intramyocellular and intrahepatic lipid content in sedentary males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hormonal responses to the exercise.(A) Growth hormone (B) Insulin (C) Cortisol. Values represent the means ± SE. *Significantly different than 0 min (p < 0.05).
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Fig2: Hormonal responses to the exercise.(A) Growth hormone (B) Insulin (C) Cortisol. Values represent the means ± SE. *Significantly different than 0 min (p < 0.05).

Mentions: Figure 2 shows the time course of changes in serum GH, insulin and cortisol concentrations during exercise and recovery periods. Before the training period, serum GH concentrations increased significantly during exercise in both groups (p < 0.05). Although a significant increase in serum GH concentration was found during exercise in both groups after the training period, the responses were not significantly different between before and after training periods in either group (Figure 2A). Serum insulin concentrations decreased significantly during exercise in both groups (p < 0.05). Although a significant decrease in serum insulin concentration was revealed after the training period, the responses were not significantly different between before and after training periods in either group (Figure 2B). Serum cortisol concentrations did not change significantly during exercise in either group, but decreased significantly during the recovery period in the LT group. Serum cortisol responses to exercise were similar between before and after training periods in both groups (Figure 2C). The area under the curve (AUC) of serum GH, insulin and cortisol concentrations during exercise and recovery periods did not change significantly between before and after training periods in either group.Figure 2


4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced growth hormone response in sedentary men.

Sasaki H, Morishima T, Hasegawa Y, Mori A, Ijichi T, Kurihara T, Goto K - Springerplus (2014)

Hormonal responses to the exercise.(A) Growth hormone (B) Insulin (C) Cortisol. Values represent the means ± SE. *Significantly different than 0 min (p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363223&req=5

Fig2: Hormonal responses to the exercise.(A) Growth hormone (B) Insulin (C) Cortisol. Values represent the means ± SE. *Significantly different than 0 min (p < 0.05).
Mentions: Figure 2 shows the time course of changes in serum GH, insulin and cortisol concentrations during exercise and recovery periods. Before the training period, serum GH concentrations increased significantly during exercise in both groups (p < 0.05). Although a significant increase in serum GH concentration was found during exercise in both groups after the training period, the responses were not significantly different between before and after training periods in either group (Figure 2A). Serum insulin concentrations decreased significantly during exercise in both groups (p < 0.05). Although a significant decrease in serum insulin concentration was revealed after the training period, the responses were not significantly different between before and after training periods in either group (Figure 2B). Serum cortisol concentrations did not change significantly during exercise in either group, but decreased significantly during the recovery period in the LT group. Serum cortisol responses to exercise were similar between before and after training periods in both groups (Figure 2C). The area under the curve (AUC) of serum GH, insulin and cortisol concentrations during exercise and recovery periods did not change significantly between before and after training periods in either group.Figure 2

Bottom Line: However, the responses did not change after training period in either group.Furthermore, the training did not significantly affect intramyocellular or intrahepatic lipid content in either group.The present study indicates that 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced GH responses, whole body fat mass or intramyocellular and intrahepatic lipid content in sedentary males.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport and Health Science, Ritsumeikan University, Shiga, Japan.

ABSTRACT
This study determined the effects of high-intensity interval training on the exercise-induced growth hormone (GH) responses, whole body and regional fat content. Twenty-four sedentary males were randomized to either a high-intensity interval training (HIT) group or a low-intensity continuous training (LT) group. The HIT group performed intermittent exercises at 85% of [Formula: see text], whereas the LT group performed continuous exercise for 22 min at 45% of [Formula: see text]. Before and after 4 weeks of training, hormonal and metabolic responses to acute exercise were determined. Acute exercise significantly increased GH concentrations in both groups (p < 0.05). However, the responses did not change after training period in either group. Furthermore, the training did not significantly affect intramyocellular or intrahepatic lipid content in either group. The present study indicates that 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training does not alter the exercise-induced GH responses, whole body fat mass or intramyocellular and intrahepatic lipid content in sedentary males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus