Limits...
Flipping for success: evaluating the effectiveness of a novel teaching approach in a graduate level setting.

Moraros J, Islam A, Yu S, Banow R, Schindelka B - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Bottom Line: International students rated the Flipped Classroom to be significantly more effective when compared to North American students (X(2) = 11.35, p < 0.05).However, students who found the Flipped Classroom to be effective were also more likely to be satisfied with their course experience.Despite these challenges, the Flipped Classroom proved to be a novel and effective teaching approach at the graduate level setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, E-Wing Health Sciences, Room 3320, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada. john.moraros@usask.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Flipped Classroom is a model that's quickly gaining recognition as a novel teaching approach among health science curricula. The purpose of this study was four-fold and aimed to compare Flipped Classroom effectiveness ratings with: 1) student socio-demographic characteristics, 2) student final grades, 3) student overall course satisfaction, and 4) course pre-Flipped Classroom effectiveness ratings.

Methods: The participants in the study consisted of 67 Masters-level graduate students in an introductory epidemiology class. Data was collected from students who completed surveys during three time points (beginning, middle and end) in each term. The Flipped Classroom was employed for the academic year 2012-2013 (two terms) using both pre-class activities and in-class activities.

Results: Among the 67 Masters-level graduate students, 80% found the Flipped Classroom model to be either somewhat effective or very effective (M = 4.1/5.0). International students rated the Flipped Classroom to be significantly more effective when compared to North American students (X(2) = 11.35, p < 0.05). Students' perceived effectiveness of the Flipped Classroom had no significant association to their academic performance in the course as measured by their final grades (r s = 0.70). However, students who found the Flipped Classroom to be effective were also more likely to be satisfied with their course experience. Additionally, it was found that the SEEQ variable scores for students enrolled in the Flipped Classroom were significantly higher than the ones for students enrolled prior to the implementation of the Flipped Classroom (p = 0.003).

Conclusions: Overall, the format of the Flipped Classroom provided more opportunities for students to engage in critical thinking, independently facilitate their own learning, and more effectively interact with and learn from their peers. Additionally, the instructor was given more flexibility to cover a wider range and depth of material, provide in-class applied learning opportunities based on problem-solving activities and offer timely feedback/guidance to students. Yet in our study, this teaching style had its fair share of challenges, which were largely dependent on the use and management of technology. Despite these challenges, the Flipped Classroom proved to be a novel and effective teaching approach at the graduate level setting.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of the Flipped Classroom structure and settings.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363198&req=5

Fig1: Flowchart of the Flipped Classroom structure and settings.

Mentions: The final portion of the class was devoted to student presentations. Each week, a pre-assigned group (three to four students per group) was responsible for presenting and answering follow up questions with regard to recent (last five years), peer reviewed article from the primary literature related to that specific week’s class topic. There was an anonymous peer evaluation sheet completed by each non-presenting student that was submitted to the instructor immediately following the group presentation. At the end of the class, the presenting group met and de-briefed with the instructor. The group was provided the comments from their peers and more structured feedback by the instructor, who also assigned them a grade. Each group presented twice each term and all students in each group received the same grade. All in-class activities were mandatory (Figure 1).Figure 1


Flipping for success: evaluating the effectiveness of a novel teaching approach in a graduate level setting.

Moraros J, Islam A, Yu S, Banow R, Schindelka B - BMC Med Educ (2015)

Flowchart of the Flipped Classroom structure and settings.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363198&req=5

Fig1: Flowchart of the Flipped Classroom structure and settings.
Mentions: The final portion of the class was devoted to student presentations. Each week, a pre-assigned group (three to four students per group) was responsible for presenting and answering follow up questions with regard to recent (last five years), peer reviewed article from the primary literature related to that specific week’s class topic. There was an anonymous peer evaluation sheet completed by each non-presenting student that was submitted to the instructor immediately following the group presentation. At the end of the class, the presenting group met and de-briefed with the instructor. The group was provided the comments from their peers and more structured feedback by the instructor, who also assigned them a grade. Each group presented twice each term and all students in each group received the same grade. All in-class activities were mandatory (Figure 1).Figure 1

Bottom Line: International students rated the Flipped Classroom to be significantly more effective when compared to North American students (X(2) = 11.35, p < 0.05).However, students who found the Flipped Classroom to be effective were also more likely to be satisfied with their course experience.Despite these challenges, the Flipped Classroom proved to be a novel and effective teaching approach at the graduate level setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, University of Saskatchewan, 104 Clinic Place, E-Wing Health Sciences, Room 3320, Saskatoon, SK, S7N 2Z4, Canada. john.moraros@usask.ca.

ABSTRACT

Background: Flipped Classroom is a model that's quickly gaining recognition as a novel teaching approach among health science curricula. The purpose of this study was four-fold and aimed to compare Flipped Classroom effectiveness ratings with: 1) student socio-demographic characteristics, 2) student final grades, 3) student overall course satisfaction, and 4) course pre-Flipped Classroom effectiveness ratings.

Methods: The participants in the study consisted of 67 Masters-level graduate students in an introductory epidemiology class. Data was collected from students who completed surveys during three time points (beginning, middle and end) in each term. The Flipped Classroom was employed for the academic year 2012-2013 (two terms) using both pre-class activities and in-class activities.

Results: Among the 67 Masters-level graduate students, 80% found the Flipped Classroom model to be either somewhat effective or very effective (M = 4.1/5.0). International students rated the Flipped Classroom to be significantly more effective when compared to North American students (X(2) = 11.35, p < 0.05). Students' perceived effectiveness of the Flipped Classroom had no significant association to their academic performance in the course as measured by their final grades (r s = 0.70). However, students who found the Flipped Classroom to be effective were also more likely to be satisfied with their course experience. Additionally, it was found that the SEEQ variable scores for students enrolled in the Flipped Classroom were significantly higher than the ones for students enrolled prior to the implementation of the Flipped Classroom (p = 0.003).

Conclusions: Overall, the format of the Flipped Classroom provided more opportunities for students to engage in critical thinking, independently facilitate their own learning, and more effectively interact with and learn from their peers. Additionally, the instructor was given more flexibility to cover a wider range and depth of material, provide in-class applied learning opportunities based on problem-solving activities and offer timely feedback/guidance to students. Yet in our study, this teaching style had its fair share of challenges, which were largely dependent on the use and management of technology. Despite these challenges, the Flipped Classroom proved to be a novel and effective teaching approach at the graduate level setting.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus