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A World Allergy Organization international survey on physical activity as a treatment option for asthma and allergies.

Moreira A, Bonini M, Pawankar R, Anderson SD, Carlsen KH, Randolph C, Silvers W, Storms W, Weiler JM, Bonini S - World Allergy Organ J (2014)

Bottom Line: Almost all respondents were aware of the strong evidence in favor of physical activity for the psychological well-being, weight control, decreased risk of diabetes, ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension.The majority (85.0%) of clinicians strongly agreed that promoting physical activity is important to health care, although 95.5% considered they required more educational training.The results of this global survey indicate that clinicians working in the field of allergy and respiratory diseases are well aware of the evidence supporting the benefits of physical activity for asthma and allergic diseases although they need more training in such counseling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital of São João and Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Physical exercise has been shown to improve asthma symptoms, QoL, exercise capacity, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and lung function and is recommended as a supplementary treatment to pharmacotherapy for asthma. Clinicians are well placed to promote physically active lifestyles, but their role and practice towards promoting physically active lifestyles among patients has not been fully investigated. This study was designed to investigate the knowledge, propensity, attitude and practices of clinicians towards the promotion of physical activity among patients with asthma and allergies.

Methods: Two hundred and eighty clinicians (mean age; 46 ± 13 years; with a clinical experience of practice for 15 ± 7 years) participated in a global survey. The survey comprised a 29-item questionnaire, which gathered information on attitudes of the clinicians towards promoting physical activity, their knowledge and their beliefs regarding evidence for benefits of physical activity as a supplementary treatment in patients with asthma and allergies.

Results: Almost all respondents were aware of the strong evidence in favor of physical activity for the psychological well-being, weight control, decreased risk of diabetes, ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension. Evidence for reduction in the risk for developing asthma and for better asthma control were reported by 60.0% and 85.4% of participants, respectively. The majority (85.0%) of clinicians strongly agreed that promoting physical activity is important to health care, although 95.5% considered they required more educational training. Although two thirds of them usually recommended exercise to their asthmatic/allergic patients, only 24.0% reported having previous training on the subject of such counseling. Almost all believed that effective counseling about a healthy diet, exercise and weight management would be easier if the clinician himself/herself was physically fit and healthy.

Conclusions: The results of this global survey indicate that clinicians working in the field of allergy and respiratory diseases are well aware of the evidence supporting the benefits of physical activity for asthma and allergic diseases although they need more training in such counseling. Therefore, concerted efforts are needed towards educating clinicians towards promoting physical activity and weight management, as a supplementary treatment for asthma and allergies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Geographical distribution of clinicians participating in the survey.
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Fig1: Geographical distribution of clinicians participating in the survey.

Mentions: There was a total of 280 responses from WAO member societies. The geographical distribution of all respondents is presented in Figure 1. The average age of the respondents was 46 ± 13 years, and their average length of being in clinical practice was 15 ± 7 years. Demographic characteristics and profiles of respondent clinicians, by medical specialty, are as shown in Table 2. Allergy and/or clinical immunology were the most represented medical disciplines among responders (n = 209, 74.6%).Figure 1


A World Allergy Organization international survey on physical activity as a treatment option for asthma and allergies.

Moreira A, Bonini M, Pawankar R, Anderson SD, Carlsen KH, Randolph C, Silvers W, Storms W, Weiler JM, Bonini S - World Allergy Organ J (2014)

Geographical distribution of clinicians participating in the survey.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4363188&req=5

Fig1: Geographical distribution of clinicians participating in the survey.
Mentions: There was a total of 280 responses from WAO member societies. The geographical distribution of all respondents is presented in Figure 1. The average age of the respondents was 46 ± 13 years, and their average length of being in clinical practice was 15 ± 7 years. Demographic characteristics and profiles of respondent clinicians, by medical specialty, are as shown in Table 2. Allergy and/or clinical immunology were the most represented medical disciplines among responders (n = 209, 74.6%).Figure 1

Bottom Line: Almost all respondents were aware of the strong evidence in favor of physical activity for the psychological well-being, weight control, decreased risk of diabetes, ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension.The majority (85.0%) of clinicians strongly agreed that promoting physical activity is important to health care, although 95.5% considered they required more educational training.The results of this global survey indicate that clinicians working in the field of allergy and respiratory diseases are well aware of the evidence supporting the benefits of physical activity for asthma and allergic diseases although they need more training in such counseling.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hospital of São João and Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal.

ABSTRACT

Background: Physical exercise has been shown to improve asthma symptoms, QoL, exercise capacity, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and lung function and is recommended as a supplementary treatment to pharmacotherapy for asthma. Clinicians are well placed to promote physically active lifestyles, but their role and practice towards promoting physically active lifestyles among patients has not been fully investigated. This study was designed to investigate the knowledge, propensity, attitude and practices of clinicians towards the promotion of physical activity among patients with asthma and allergies.

Methods: Two hundred and eighty clinicians (mean age; 46 ± 13 years; with a clinical experience of practice for 15 ± 7 years) participated in a global survey. The survey comprised a 29-item questionnaire, which gathered information on attitudes of the clinicians towards promoting physical activity, their knowledge and their beliefs regarding evidence for benefits of physical activity as a supplementary treatment in patients with asthma and allergies.

Results: Almost all respondents were aware of the strong evidence in favor of physical activity for the psychological well-being, weight control, decreased risk of diabetes, ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension. Evidence for reduction in the risk for developing asthma and for better asthma control were reported by 60.0% and 85.4% of participants, respectively. The majority (85.0%) of clinicians strongly agreed that promoting physical activity is important to health care, although 95.5% considered they required more educational training. Although two thirds of them usually recommended exercise to their asthmatic/allergic patients, only 24.0% reported having previous training on the subject of such counseling. Almost all believed that effective counseling about a healthy diet, exercise and weight management would be easier if the clinician himself/herself was physically fit and healthy.

Conclusions: The results of this global survey indicate that clinicians working in the field of allergy and respiratory diseases are well aware of the evidence supporting the benefits of physical activity for asthma and allergic diseases although they need more training in such counseling. Therefore, concerted efforts are needed towards educating clinicians towards promoting physical activity and weight management, as a supplementary treatment for asthma and allergies.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus